News / Middle East

Syrian Activists: Government Air Strike Kills More Than 60

A view shows blood and bread on the ground after what activists said were missiles fired by a Syrian Air Force fighter jet from forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad hit a bakery in Halfaya, near Hama December 23, 2012.
A view shows blood and bread on the ground after what activists said were missiles fired by a Syrian Air Force fighter jet from forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad hit a bakery in Halfaya, near Hama December 23, 2012.
VOA News

Syrian activists say a government air strike on a bakery killed more than 60 people Sunday, even as international peace envoy Lakhdar Brahimi began another visit to negotiate an end to Syria's civil war.

The attack occurred in the rebel-controlled town of Halfaya in Hama province. If confirmed, it would be one of the deadliest incidents in the 21-month conflict. The number of casualties is expected to rise because some 50 of those wounded are listed in critical condition.

It is not clear if the bombed out, one-story building was actually a bakery, but video posted online showed men working frantically to free people, including at least one woman, from the debris.  Bloodstained bodies littered the surrounding area and street.

Activists also reported government airstrikes in Aleppo province and on the eastern outskirts of Damascus, as troops loyal to President Bashar al-Assad attempted to drive rebels from his seat of power.

Brahimi arrived in the Syrian capital after driving from Lebanon, since fighting near Damascus' airport has intensified in recent weeks.  The U.N.-Arab League peace envoy is expected to meet President Assad on Monday.

Syrian Information Minister Omran al-Zoubi told a news conference that the government remains open to resolving the conflict through dialogue, but he warned the rebels and their supporters that "time is running out" for such a process.

Rebels and exiled Syrian opposition groups have refused to negotiate with Mr. Assad, demanding instead that he step down from his 12-year rule. More than 40,000 people have been killed since the Syrian president began a violent crackdown on what began as a peaceful opposition uprising in March 2011.

Western powers and their Arab allies have repeatedly called for the departure of Mr. Assad, whose few remaining allies include Russia, Iran and Lebanese militant group Hezbollah. In recent days, Moscow's support for Mr. Assad has slipped, with Russian officials saying they will not stand by him at any price and will welcome any foreign offers to grant him safe passage into exile.


Some information for this report was provided by AFP, AP and Reuters.

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by: Anonymous
December 24, 2012 11:18 PM
The rebels have cried wolf before... Liars, and killers, these insurgent rebels, they have timed this so-called air strike, with the Brahimi visit to create another fabricated "Government Massacre". This murder was another cynical manipulation of the MSM, not an air strike, most likely an IED car bomb.

by: David Lango from: Los Angeles
December 24, 2012 1:10 AM
Ron Paul was right. The Golden Rule should be reflected in our foreign policy. This isn't right. It's all wrong. We should be trading with Iran, not sanctioning them! Their biggest crime isn't defiance to Israel, but rather selling oil to Russia and China for gold! Supplying arms to Al Qaida terrorists to overthrow Asad's regime seems very wrong! Why was Obama complicit in the overthrow of Libya? What is a Dinar? Why did Iraq return it's sale of oil from Euros back to Dollars when it was worth less? Why do we like Al Qaida again? Isn't arming Al Qaida to topple the government in Syria going to inspire Iran to get the bomb sooner than later?

We need to end the Fed. If we end the Fed, the wars will grind to a halt. Uncle Sam will not have to oblige the Rothschild Zionism that has hijacked our foreign policy. They own the media and have controlled the conversation for generations. They bought Reuters back in the 1800's to hide themselves; and their political influence has slid right off the stage. What we see now is complete control of the conversation, and half of this country is yearning for the global socialism they promise! A one world government hellbent on depopulation and enslaving the remaining survivors of the planet, by dissolving national sovereignty and removing guns from citizens! We've been lied to for generations. And they didn't even provide a plane for building 7.

by: Mungai Mselle from: Arusha
December 24, 2012 12:31 AM
the assad regime must go now. The african union must take another step ahead to ensuare that the situastion in syria become level

by: Tajicat Cats
December 23, 2012 10:05 PM
we in the Us lost children in school teachers ect..
just let us imagine how these poor folks no different then us
are even seeing much worse on a daily diet..Who Is going to help
them..how can we as Americans turn our heads like nothing is
happening!!!!!>>>>>

by: Anonymous
December 23, 2012 7:34 PM
Assad has killed more innocent people than Osama Bin Laden.

by: Anonymous
December 23, 2012 6:13 PM
It's time the International Criminal Court puts out a warrant for his arrest. How many more thousands of people are to be killed? It would be great if the world countries threw some money in a pot as a reward for Assads capture to face the International Criminal Court.

by: syrian from: have no place
December 23, 2012 6:11 PM
Halfaya's air strike has killed mor than 90 people. there is children and women between the victims. and most of the victims have families wating the bread. I wondering what will happen to them? what the Human Organizations, UN, will do?..

by: Anonymous
December 23, 2012 6:06 PM
Assad is a criminal and should be held responsible for every death since the uprising. Dropping bombs on women, children and elderly in line for bread is just plain murder, mistake or no mistake. I think the outside world should be helping more with logistics and helping the FSA capture Assad for these crimes. It would be different if Assad wasn't bombing civillians, but he is. Using your army to wipe out civilians is genocide. The crimes commited already by Assad certainly by far deserves thousands of death sentences in most modern countries.

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