News / Asia

    Drawn-out Jetliner Search Tests China's Patience, Cooperation

    • A family member of a passenger onboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 talks to reporters in a hotel in Beijing, March 14, 2014.
    • Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib Razak leaves after Friday prayers that included special prayers for passengers of flight MH370 at a mosque near Kuala Lumpur International Airport, March 14, 2014.
    • Malaysia's Minister of Transport Hishamuddin Hussein, center, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, director general of the Malaysian Department of Civil Aviation, left and Malaysia Airlines Group CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya, right, at a press conference in Sepang, March 14, 2014.
    • A Vietnamese Air Force colonel uses binoculars on board a flying aircraft during a mission to search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in the Gulf of Thailand, March 13, 2014.
    • A Chinese relative of passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane watches TV as she waits for the latest news in a hotel room in Beijing, China, March 13, 2014.
    • Students light candles to express hope and solidarity for the passengers aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, Manila, Philippines, March 13, 2014.
    • Children read messages and well wishes for all involved with the missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner MH370 on the walls of the Kuala Lumpur International Airport, March 13, 2014.
    • A Vietnam Air Force aircraft AN-26 flies over Con Dao island during a mission to find the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, March 12, 2014.
    • Vietnamese military personnel take part in the search for a missing Malaysian airliner off Vietnam's Tho Chu island, March 10, 2014.
    • A child reacts to the camera as others light candles during a vigil for missing Malaysia Airlines passengers at the Independence Square in Kuala Lumpur, March 10, 2014.
    • An officer stands guard near Vietnam aircraft before a mission to find the Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 at Phu Quoc Airport on Phu Quoc Island, March 10, 2014.
    The Search for MH370
    The drawn-out search for missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 is testing the patience of the families of those on board, and testing the ability of governments in the region to cooperate.

    Malaysia has increasingly come under fire as the days pass and there are more questions than answers about what happened to the missing jet.
     
    Flight MH370 Timeline

    • Mar. 8: Departs Kuala Lumpur at 12:41am local time for Beijing
      Air traffic controllers lose contact with the plane around 1:30am
      Vietnam launches search operation, two oil slicks are spotted but are not related to plane

    • Mar. 9: Malaysia suggests plane may have strayed off course
      Debris spotted off Vietnam, but it is not from the airplane

    • Mar. 10: Search radius expanded, as China urges Malaysia to speed up investigation
       
    • Mar. 11: Search extended to western side of Malaysian peninsula
       
    • Mar. 12: Chinese satellite images of possible debris are released and determined not to be related to the plane
       
    • Mar. 13: Malaysia rejects Wall Street Journal report that MH370 flew for four hours after its last known contact
       
    • Mar. 14: Search now includes South China Sea, Malacca Strait and Indian Ocean
      Media reports say MH370 communications system continued to ping a satellite hours after plane disappeared
       
    • Mar. 15:  Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak says someone on MH370 likely turned off its communications systems
       
    • Mar. 17: 26 countries now involved in the search
       
    • Mar. 19: FBI analyzes flight simulator data from the home of the MH370 pilot
       
    • Mar. 20: Australian aircraft investigate possible debris in a remote area of the southern Indian Ocean
    Chinese state media and editorials blasted Malaysia over its response, arguing that the conflicting signals authorities have been sending are only adding to grieving families’ confusion and anguish.
     
    ​Chinese officials have repeatedly urged Malaysia to hurry up with the search and did so again Friday.

    ​Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said the Chinese people are very anxious. He says China is calling on Malaysia to shoulder its responsibility in coordinating the search effort. Hong urged Malaysia to step up efforts to enhance coordination, efficiency and to report their findings in a timely fashion.
     
    South China Sea

    Although the focus of the search seemed to be shifting more heavily toward waters off the west coast of Malaysia Friday, China says its attention is still on the South China Sea.
     
    Debris from what could be Malaysian Airlines flight 330 is seen in this satellite image from China's State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense.Debris from what could be Malaysian Airlines flight 330 is seen in this satellite image from China's State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense.
    x
    Debris from what could be Malaysian Airlines flight 330 is seen in this satellite image from China's State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense.
    Debris from what could be Malaysian Airlines flight 330 is seen in this satellite image from China's State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense.
    Beijing has increasingly been putting forward more suggestions about where the plane might be as the search has become more complicated. On Thursday, state-television released satellite photos of debris that it thought might be the plane.
     
    On Friday, state media quoted Chinese scientists who say they recorded what they called "a seafloor event" in waters near Vietnam and Malaysia around the time the plane vanished. The report said the event could have been caused by a plane plunging into the sea.
     
    David Zweig, a political science professor at Hong Kong's University of Science and Technology says that despite criticism the fact that the plane practically dropped off the face of the earth poses an enormous challenge for any government.

    "I don't think anybody could do much more than what the Malaysians are doing, " he said, "they are willing to accept a lot of international assistance and try to, to find the plane, which some countries would not be willing to do. I am not sure that China would do so if a ship had fallen into potentially Chinese waters."
     
    Chinese authorities have also had to admit to errors while scraping to find new clues as well.

    The satellite photos of debris released by Chinese media were later debunked. Chinese officials later said the photographs were a "mistake" and should not have been released.

    International effort

    While Malaysia is taking the lead on the mission, 12 other countries have sent warships and aircraft to scour an area of thousands of kilometers where the plane might have crashed.

    Many of the countries that have pitched in to help are members of regional groupings, such as ASEAN. They maintain regular exchanges on trade and economic issues but analysts say their ability to work together to respond to emergencies is lacking.

    Xie Tao, a professor of diplomacy at Beijing Foreign Studies University, said the tragedy should be a wake up call for all the governments in the region.

    "Today it's Malaysia, maybe next time it's Vietnam, and maybe next time it's a Chinese airplane," Xie said. "After this the governments involved they will think about how we will better improve cooperation at least in some non-controversial issues like search and rescue and some non-conventional security cooperation."

    Up to this point, most of the search has been focused on the South China Sea, a resource rich body of water that is crisscrossed by territorial disputes between China and a number of countries in the region, including Malaysia.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Mark from: Virginia
    March 14, 2014 5:34 PM
    the Chinese are blaming the Malaysians for not doing enough, and not putting out info fast enough for the grieving families, while it seems, at the same time, China is adding more to the families' woes by coughing out wrong information and trick photos than easing woes. Everyone just need to give Malaysia a break and help out, without this added criticism over how its handling things. Its tough enough for one nation to shoulder that its plane is missing, now to coordinate a complex search going on what little facts they have (and a ton of speculation and false leads), has to be maddeningly tough.
    Personally, I would rather sit in silence and wait for news on a loved one than constantly be pelted with tidbits of false hope and non-helpful news.
    Does China really think they will find survivors...? I know more Chinese died in this tragedy, but to pressure another nation so damningly...finding a needle in a haystack may be easier. I know China wants closure to this...just remember it took nearly 73 years to find the Titanic, and its last location was documented well even in 1912 when she sank. A Boeing 777 is 1/4 the size of the Titanic. If ever they find the missing plane, and if the 'black box' is still functioning, then some sense came be made of what happened. Until then, we just have to wait and let the searches, well.... search.
    In Response

    by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
    March 15, 2014 1:25 AM
    You should stop posting irresponsible comment here! China has every right to press Malaysia to work harder. There are more than 200 souls. They are waiting for our help. Every seconds counts. And dmn you just willing to sit there and wait? That's exactly why China is pushing Malaysia, because those lazy ppl are just like you, ignorant!

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