News / Africa

DRC Army Accused of Abuses During Retreat from Goma

A Congolese soldier at the last army check point in Munigi, near Goma in the DRC on Nov. 19, 2012.
A Congolese soldier at the last army check point in Munigi, near Goma in the DRC on Nov. 19, 2012.
Gabe Joselow
Civilians in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo say soldiers from the Congolese army have been looting homes and raping residents in towns under their control, as they retreat from M23 rebels.
 
More than a thousand soldiers from the Congolese army, known as FARDC, roamed the streets of Minova Saturday, after suffering setbacks this week in their fight against the M23 rebels.
 
  • M23 rebels guard weapons given to them by the government's army, Goma, DRC, November 21, 2012.
  • A Congo government policeman hands in his weapon to M23 rebels during an M23 rally in Goma, DRC, November 21, 2012.
  • Congo government policemen, foreground, and civilians gather during a M23 rally in Goma, Congo, November 21, 2012.
  • A M23 fighter, wearing a belt of ammunition, walks down a street in Goma, after the rebels captured the city from the government army, November 20, 2012.
  • People walk the streets of Goma, DRC during a lull in the fighting, November 20, 2012. (VOA 100 Citoyens journalistes de RD Congo)
  • M23 rebels in the streets of Goma in the Democratic Republic of Congo, November 20, 2012. (A. Malivika/VOA)
  • M23 rebels enter Goma, November 20, 2012. (A. Malivika/VOA)
  • M23 rebels celebrating their takeover of Goma, DRC, November 20, 2012. (A. Malivika/VOA)
  • M23 spokesperson Lt. Col. Vianney Kazarama entering Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo, November 20, 2012. (A. Malivika/VOA)
  • M23 Rebels patrolling in Goma, DRC, November 20, 2012. (A. Malivika/VOA)

The army has been consolidating its forces in the town, which lies between Goma and Bukavu on the shores of Lake Kivu.
 
Residents here say while they initially welcomed the soldiers, they have become a terror to the town: raping women, looting shops and even killing people.
 
Minova resident Nico Patrice said the abuses started over the last two days, after FARDC lost a battle for the town of Sake, about 25 kilometers from the commercial hub of Goma, which is also under rebel control.
 
“They took a lot of items from the shops,” he said, “a lot of food items, and things for sale. They told us that if anyone complained, they would get killed.
 
  • Shops closed in Sake a day after M23 rebels took control of the town following overnight battles with the Congolese army, DRC, November 23, 2012. (G. Joselow/VOA)
  • Fighting has displaced tens of thousands of people from the town of Sake, west of Goma, DRC, November 23, 2011. (G. Joselow/VOA)
  • With IDP camps filling up since the rebellion in eastern Congo began in April, newly displaced people are sleeping in churches until they can find a place to settle, DRC, November 23, 2012. (G. Joselow/VOA)
  • Displaced people from the town of Sake gather at the Mugunga camp on the road to Goma, DRC, November 23, 2012. (G. Joselow.VOA)
  • Families flee fighting between the Congolese army and M23 rebels in the town of Sake, DRC, November 23, 2012. G. Joselow/VOA)

A United Nations liaison working in the town confirmed accounts of FARDC soldiers committing grave human rights violations and said U.N. peacekeepers were coming to survey the situation.
 
A convoy of soldiers from the U.N. Peacekeeping mission in Congo (MONUSCO) headed toward Minova from the direction of Goma Saturday, but was turned away at a checkpoint manned by a government-aligned militia.
 
Residents at displaced people's camps around Goma have complained of similar abuses by retreating Congolese soldiers.
 
Human rights groups also have recorded violations by Congolese soldiers during past conflicts. The M23 rebels are also accused of committing executions, rape and forced recruitment of soldiers as they seize territory in the east.
 
While the fighting has subsided over the past two days, the consolidation of FARDC forces may be a sign that hostilities could soon resume. On Saturday, a soldier with a government-aligned militia outside Minova said they and the government forces are planning to attack the rebels.

Fearing violence, residents, clutching their belongings, fled the area around Minova Saturday - a scene that has repeated itself throughout the conflict in eastern DRC. One woman said U.N. peacekeepers told her to take refuge in a local hospital.
 
The United Nations says as many as 140,000 people have been displaced by recent fighting in and around Goma.

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by: satan kamudila matata from: Bunia Ituri
November 26, 2012 6:15 AM
FARDC the French name for RDC army can loot, rape and escape confronting the enemies due to lack of proper management.These soldiers have their wives, children,relatives and families.These soldiers have salary of 50usd per month without ration and these money cant afford any life to even a single man leaving a lonely life compare to them. Automatically they are titled to loot and rape because behind them while at war,their wives also sells themselves to other men in order to earn living. And these could happen to those with five children paying their school fees,feeding and might be even renting.Then anybody from no where come to say that,those fighting should be sanctioned yet the government does'nt take care of anybody in terms of salary.These armies are a gain given dry beans at the battle ground.What time do you think they can have to cook their dry beans and fight?.The Kabila government uses the system called AUTO RETURN of all money meant for such operations and what do you think would happen? We are ready politically to solve these problems once and for all. Without M23 starting the fire,people were already tired with this SELF STILES Government. Last message to the world is that,PLAYERS ARE YET TO COME. thanks

by: David from: Washington
November 24, 2012 9:40 PM
. M23 should not integrate DRC Army because they come from Rwanda & Uganda Army, they will betray DRC. Presently DRC Army is very weak because Rwandese and Uganda Army infiltrated DRC Army with complicity of Joseph Kabila and community international. DRC need a new leadership and new army. In addition UN’s drones have to bomb position to reduce theorist activities in DRC.

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