News / Health

British Airways Suspends Liberia, Sierra Leone Flights Due to Ebola

  • World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Margaret Chan sits next to Keiji Fukuda, WHO's Assistant Director-General for health security after an emergency meeting. The WHO announced that West Africa's epidemic of Ebola is an "extraordinary event" and now constitutes an international health risk, in Geneva, Aug. 8, 2014.
  • This undated photo made available by the Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium, shows the Ebola virus viewed through an electron microscope. The World Health Organization on Aug. 8, 2014 declared the Ebola outbreak in West Africa to be an international public health emergency that requires an extraordinary response to stop its spread.
  • An ambulance transporting Miguel Pajares, a Spanish priest who was infected with the Ebola virus while working in Liberia, leaves the Military Air Base of Torrejon de Ardoz, near Madrid, Spain, Aug. 7, 2014.
  • Aid workers and doctors transfer Miguel Pajares from a plane to an ambulance as he leaves the Torrejon de Ardoz military airbase, near Madrid, Spain, Aug. 7, 2014.
  • A Nigerian port health official uses a thermometer on a worker at the arrivals hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria, Aug. 6, 2014.
  • An ambulance carrying American missionary Nancy Writebol, 59, who is infected with Ebola in West Africa arrives past crowds of people taking pictures at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, Aug. 5, 2014.
  • Nigeria health officials wait to screen passengers at the arrival hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria, Aug. 4, 2014. 
  • Nigeria health officials display a leaflet explaining the Ebola virus, at the arrival hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport, in Lagos, Nigeria, Aug. 4, 2014. 
  • Dr. Kent Brantly and his wife, Amber, are seen in an undated photo provided by Samaritan's Purse. Brantly became the first person infected with Ebola to be brought to the United States from Africa, arriving at Emory University Hospital, in Atlanta, Aug. 2, 2014. 
  • People queue outside a bank as fear spreads that public buildings might be closed due to the spread of the deadly Ebola virus, Monrovia, Liberia, Aug. 4, 2014. 
VOA News

A second major airline has suspended flights to parts of West Africa because of the deadly Ebola outbreak in the region.

British Airways said Tuesday that it is suspending flights to and from Liberia and Sierra Leone due to "the deteriorating public health situation in both countries."  It said the suspension is due to run until August 31.

The Dubai-based airline Emirates suspended its service to Guinea on August 2.

The three countries are the epicenter of the Ebola outbreak that has killed nearly 900 people in the region this year.

Late Monday, the World Bank pledged up to $200 million to help Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone contain the outbreak, improve public health systems and help communities cope with the economic impact of the crisis.

The bank said workers have fled farming areas in Ebola-affected zones, although it said "there has been no measurable impact on the food supply."

Meanwhile, a second U.S. missionary who contracted Ebola in Liberia has arrived back in the United States.

Nancy Writebol traveled on a specially outfitted plane that landed in the southeastern city of Atlanta on Tuesday.  She will be treated at Emory University Hospital, alongside an American doctor who also contracted the deadly virus while treating patients in Liberia.

Both received a dose of an experimental serum before leaving Liberia.

On Monday, officials at a New York City hospital said a man suffering from a high fever and gastrointestinal problems arrived at the emergency room and was quickly isolated. They say the patient recently traveled to a West African country where Ebola has been reported, and is now undergoing tests to determine the cause of his illness. No other details about the man were given.

Authorities in Nigeria Monday reported the country's second confirmed case of Ebola -- a doctor who treated the first patient who died July 25 in Lagos.  Eight others are being monitored for the disease.

Ebola is spread through direct contact with the blood or bodily fluids of an infected persons.  Symptoms include fever, vomiting, diarrhea and bleeding from the eyes, ears, mouth and nose.   

Death rates from Ebola in the past have gone as high as 90 percent, but the death rate from the current outbreak is closer to 60 percent.


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Comment Sorting
by: Leroy Padmore from: Jersey City
August 06, 2014 12:02 AM
The Problem about Liberia is, Liberia needs young leaders that will bring new energy to the table. Leaders that will deliver new idea that will enlightening the young people of Liberia, to inspire the young generation to take Liberia to the horizon. Liberia need leaders that will challenge the mind of the young generation, not only to challenge their mind, but to implement those ideas, and it takes young leaders. As we move into the 21 lst century we need a new innovation that will transform the minds and the life of the people. Our Past and current leaders has failed us, our churches has failed us, It is time that the old go away, and the new comes. it is time that we Liberians look into ourselves. to do it, and not to look oversea for support. we Liberia have lot of resources to develop herself. Liberia have lot of minerals to develop herself., the problem is, Liberia doesn't have to no faithful leaders, leaders that will love her and cherish his or her native land. It is time to love Liberia again, it is time for Liberians to go back to her first love, our country. Our country is dying slowly, it is time to resurrect Liberia, it is time for Liberians to get involve with the situation in Liberia. We are calling on Liberians from all over to the world, no matter where you found yourself, get involve.
Ebola has bring shame and disgrace to our country, we blamed the present Government. Madam Sirleaf has not done enough to protect the welfare of our fellow Liberians that are in the country. The JFK is closed down, one of the leading and outstanding medical facility in our country, that minister to the health of the people is closed down. This is enough, Madam Sirleaf needs to go. Her time is over in Liberia. Liberia is so dirty and nasty, what Madam Sirleaf is doing? We had Mary Broh in the right position for such a time like this, we do understand that she did something that were unlawful. but at the same token, she was the best city major after the war. I don't care what nobody say. We need to bring Mary Broh back to City Hall, That Old man that sleep on the Job all the time, need to go. We need strong people for the 21 lst century. It it time that Liberians re-dream again. God Bless, God Bless the Liberian people, May God heal our land.

by: Pashmina Dewani from: Dubai
August 05, 2014 4:21 PM
This is horrifying ... I'm speechless everytime I read a Ebola article.
I am tensed my family is in Liberia

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