News / Middle East

Tensions Remain Outside Egypt's Presidential Palace

Egyptian Army soldiers install barbed wire outside the presidential palace to secure the site of overnight clashes between supporters and opponents of President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012.
Egyptian Army soldiers install barbed wire outside the presidential palace to secure the site of overnight clashes between supporters and opponents of President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012.
Edward Yeranian
Under a heavy military presence, the bulk of demonstrators cleared out from an area near Egypt's presidential palace Thursday afternoon, reducing, for the time being, protests against President Mohamed Morsi and a proposed constitution.

Members of the elite Republican and Presidential Guard units placed barbed wire across the main road near the palace to separate the few hundred supporters and opponents of the president still camped out in the area. A handful of tanks and armored personnel carriers took up positions outside the palace.

From the scene, VOA Cairo Bureau Chief Elizabeth Arrott says the palace neighborhood has been under a siege of protests for more than 24 hours.

"It's an upscale neighborhood, so a lot of people live there and they can't avoid it," she said. "It was very, very tense in the areas. They were throwing Molotov cocktails, petrol bombs and rocks and it was running street battles. They were going back and forth and of course these are where people live."

Elizabeth Arrott describes the protests:



Morsi to address the nation

A member of the president's entourage told The Associated Press that Morsi was "going about business as usual" inside the palace.

Arab media report that the president will address the nation later in the day.

Opposition leaders called for another demonstration against the country's new draft constitution later Thursday, and a larger demonstration following Friday prayers.

Presidential Palace, Cairo, Egypt.Presidential Palace, Cairo, Egypt.
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Presidential Palace, Cairo, Egypt.
Presidential Palace, Cairo, Egypt.
The leader of the umbrella opposition coalition, Mohammed ElBaradei, told supporters Wednesday that he and his colleagues would not negotiate with the president until he withdraws the draft constitution and cancels a planned December 15 referendum.

He said that the opposition is open to dialogue but can not accept the constitutional document under any circumstances and that protests will continue, including a possible general strike.  ElBaradei said the regime has lost its legitimacy because it is a tyranny.

Omar Ashour, who teaches political science at the University of Exeter in Britain, said that it will be difficult to bring an end to the popular protests, because the opposition is a diverse set of groups and that each has a different goal:

"The opposition is not a united entity in any way," he said. "They have very different targets. Some have toppling the regime; some are bringing back the former regime figures in power, some are about the constitution, some are about the constitutional declaration.

"So it's not really a united command," he said. "No matter what [Morsi] will give, there will be some opposition on the streets."

Long-term, Ashour believes that the only way out of this crisis is for Egypt to "build institutions that represent the Egyptian people," rather than just "two opposing political camps, each of which insists that it speaks on behalf of the Egyptian people."  

  • An Egyptian protester reads the newspaper as others sit next to their tents in Tahrir Square in Cairo, December 9, 2012
  • Egyptian men stand near writing on a wall in Arabic that reads down with the leader's rule, no to the Muslim Brotherhood in Tahrir Square in Cairo, December 9, 2012.
  • An Egyptian jet fighter flys over Tahrir Square as protesters gather, not pictured, in Cairo, December 9, 2012.
  • Anti-Mursi protesters walk near a military tank in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, December 8, 2012.
  • Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood welcome tanks arriving outside the Egyptian presidential palace in Cairo, December 6, 2012.
  • Egyptian Army soldiers install barbed wire outside the presidential palace to secure the site of overnight clashes between supporters and opponents of President Mohamed Morsi in Cairo, Egypt, Dec. 6, 2012
  • Anti-Morsi protesters set off fireworks and shine laser pointers on a road leading to the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, December 6, 2012.
  • Protesters gather during clashes between supporters and opponents of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi outside the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, December 5, 2012.
  • A wounded protester reacts during clashes between supporters and opponents of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi outside the presidential palace in Cairo, December 5, 2012.
  • Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi carry a body of one of six victims killed during Wednesday's clashes, Al Azhar mosque, Cairo, Egypt, December 7, 2012.
  • Protesters opposing president Mohamed Morsi attend Friday prayers beneath a poster depicting protesters killed in the Egyptian revolution, Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, December 7, 2012.

Death toll

Five people were killed and more than 350 were injured during the violence in Cairo.

The violence started Wednesday when Morsi's Islamist supporters attacked opposition demonstrators angered by the president's decree issued last month. The mandate granted Morsi sweeping powers that place him above review from the judiciary.

The clashes outside the presidential palace marked the first time that political rivals in deeply divided Egypt have battled each other since last year's protests that ousted longtime authoritarian president Hosni Mubarak.

A referendum on the constitution is set for December 15, though reports surfaced on Thursday indicating a possible postponement.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Michael from: USA
December 06, 2012 9:28 AM
The situation is tragic. Since Mediaeval days, Jews have moderated between Christians and Moslems. Now who is to moderate between Moslem and Moslem? The Jews have a part to play but I do not know in what way, this in the coming New Age


by: Sunny Enwerem from: Lagos Nigeria
December 06, 2012 8:24 AM
Morsi should learn how to be a true president for all and not for the 52% that voted him into office,any form of constitution drawn up by 52 % of any nation can not hold ground and why is the president's party or better said as the Muslim Botherhood allieanating the 48% that voted In support of the other party as the Mobarak loyalist when he should be uniting the country?power will always and for ever change hands,let them know.


by: ali baba from: new york
December 06, 2012 6:07 AM
the shadow of civil war is imminent . thank god for Muslim brotherhood. and thank god of Muslim brotherhood lobbying in white house that considering controlling of Egypt and Libya are the process of democracy . the money is giving to them even attack American embassy in Cairo and Libya
n Egypt. They deliberate massacre in Christian in Cairo . yes it is democracy , we have to give them another 100 billion . yes give them military aids even the armored vehicle run over the body of innocent protesters. for the sake of democracy .it is new definition of Muslim brotherhood democracy

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