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Egypt Erupting: Destruction and Death as Rival Protesters Clash

Anger and frustration are boiling over in Egypt, where supporters and opponents of President Mohamed Morsi are increasingly clashing in the streets.



In Egypt's second largest city, Alexandria, rival protesters turned out in force, fighting with guns and firecrackers. At least one person was killed while the offices of Mr. Morsi's political party were set on fire.

Riot police moved in with armored vehicles to break up the clashes, firing tear gas in an effort to clear the streets.



Thousands of Morsi supporters also demonstrated Friday in a show of support for the embattled president, vowing to stay on the streets to protect his legitimacy.



Opponents, meanwhile, have been gathering in growing numbers in Cairo's Tahrir Square, waving Egyptian flags and calling for Mr. Morsi's departure.

Bigger opposition protests are planned for Sunday, the one-year anniversary of Mr. Morsi's presidency.



Egyptian military officials have urged both sides to refrain from violence and settle their differences through dialogue but neither side appears willing to give in.

Saber Atta defended Egypt's president during Friday's pro-Morsi rally in Cairo.



"Mohamed Mursi will not fall because he has a people who love him and a group who support him. It is impossible and they (the opposition) are wrong to think that one day Mursi will have the same fate as Hosni Mubarak."



Opponents accuse Mr. Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood movement of trying to undermine secular rights and are increasing calling for the current government to fall.

Clashes between the two sides are leaving an ever-growing toll.

Two people have reportedly been killed in the recent violence in Alexandria with scores of other wounded. Over the past two days, battles between Morsi supporters and opponents in the provincial regions of Fayyoum, Sharqiya and Dhekeliya have left at least three dead and 300 wounded.

Egyptian opposition leader Amr Moussa Friday urged Mr. Morsi to respect the will of the people.



"He should take the voice of the people seriously and the protests, the angry comments, as an expression - major expression - of dissatisfaction. Please take that seriously and accept the early elections."



Mr. Morsi addressed the nation Wednesday, admitting to making some mistakes but offering few compromises.

Moussa called it a miscalculation.



"They don't want to recognize that there is anger and those are all people who are being pushed and directed by others. And they are missing the point, they are missing a major point in this."



Mr. Morsi took the stage in Cairo's Tahrir Square on June 30 last year as a jubilant crowd celebrated him as the nation's first freely elected leader.

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