News / Africa

Egypt's Top Judges Resist Morsi Decrees

Egyptian protesters gather outside the country's high court in Cairo, Egypt, Nov. 24, 2012.
Egyptian protesters gather outside the country's high court in Cairo, Egypt, Nov. 24, 2012.
Edward Yeranian
Egypt's judiciary has joined the growing opposition to a recent set of decrees by President Mohamed Morsi, which have provoked public outrage. And judges in Alexandria have announced they will go on strike to protest the decrees. 

Egypt's highest judicial body, the Supreme Judicial Council, is condemning the decrees granting President Mohamed Morsi sweeping powers, branding them “an unprecedented attack” on the independence of the judiciary.  And a broad spectrum of Egypt's judiciary is expressing support for the country's outgoing judicial head, Abdel Mejid Mahmoud, who was fired by the president Thursday.

Former Prosecutor General Abdel Mejid Mahmoud speaks to reporters in Cairo, Nov. 24, 2012.
Former Prosecutor General Abdel Mejid Mahmoud speaks to reporters in Cairo, Nov. 24, 2012.

Mahmoud received a standing ovation by members of Egypt's Judge's Club, after telling them that he will appeal the president's decision to the judiciary. Mahmoud said he will insist on the application of all legal articles, including those that deal with the powers of the judiciary and the position of general prosecutor.  

At the same time that Mahmoud was receiving the applause of his fellow judges, newly named General Prosecutor Talaat Ibrahim Abdallah told a press conference that he will remain impartial towards both those who oppose and support him. Abdallah said that he will not take sides in the current judicial political divide and remains equidistant from all parties, including those in favor of and against his nomination.

Judges in Egypt's second largest city of Alexandria also announced that they would hold a work stoppage until President Morsi withholds the decrees which have fueled a firestorm. Twenty six political parties and three former presidential candidates back a widespread protest movement in Cairo's Tahrir Square, where thousands of demonstrators massed Friday.

Prominent Egyptian democracy advocate Mohammed ElBaradei has called on Egypt's president to rescind the near absolute powers he has granted himself. The Nobel laureate addressed crowds gathered in Cairo's central square on Saturday.

Said Sadek, who teaches political sociology at the American University in Cairo, said the president has pushed all but his most loyal supporters to turn against him.

"Now, the president is becoming more and more isolated," Sadek said. "Yesterday, when he was giving the speech in front of his own presidential palace, only Muslim Brotherhood people and Salafis attended, while in Tahrir Square you had the people, the groups that led the revolution, and they are all against this new constitutional proclamation."

Sadek went on to call Morsi's controversial decrees “a poisoned cake full of dictatorship or autocratic rule.”  He said those decrees are a “cover-up for the Muslim Brotherhood taking over the country and creating a theocratic state.”

Revolutionary forces opposed to the president's move have called for a new popular protest in Tahrir Square on Tuesday.  Some demonstrators have set up a tent camp in the square reminiscent of last year's popular protests against the government of ousted president Hosni Mubarak.  Partisans of Mr. Morsi are also calling for a demonstration to support him Sunday.

You May Like

How to Safeguard Your Mobile Privacy

As the digital world becomes more mobile, so too do concerns about eroding privacy and increased hacking More

'Desert Dancer' Chronicles Iranian Underground Dance Troupe

Film by Richard Raymond is based on true story of Afshin Ghaffarian and his friends More

Audio Top 5 Songs for Week Ending May 23

This week's lineup can be summed up like this: 'It's The Same Old Song' - but they're great songs - featuring Walk The Moon, The Weeknd, Wiz Khalifa and Charlie Puth More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: ali baba from: new york
November 24, 2012 9:50 PM
moresy decision is a clear indication of abusing the power. he has a plan to convert the country into islamic state by any means necessary. he want to convert the country into islamic state on the expenses of moderate muslim and liberal and christain. . he did not understand that his plan will have severe negative impact on economy. eventually wesern country especially europen countries and us will lose trust on him and all the aids to the country will dry up .tourist will not visit a country that turn into stone age for the sake of islam

by: Nikos Retsos from: Chicago, USA
November 24, 2012 7:17 PM
According to the top Egyptian newspaper, Ahram Online, November 24, 2012, the Egyptian Judiciary is divided between Judges who oppose Morsi, and Judges who support Morsi and accuse the opposing judges of "being lackeys of the former regime of Hosni Mubarak!

It is, therefore, fair to say that Egypt is not up in arms against Mr. Morsi as it is portrayed in the Western media hadlines. And, of course, there is El-Baradei, the loser of the Egyptian presidential election, who grabbed the opportunity to spit some sour grapes against Mr. Morsi.

The Egyptian people had a revolution, and the world must respect the leaders elected by the Egyptian people afterward in their first free and fair election in the Egyptian history! I sincerely feel that the Westerm media headlines are unfair to Mr. Morsi on their coverage of the current Egyptian events.
Nikos Retsos, retired professor

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Female American Soldiers: Healing Through Filmmakingi
X
Bernard Shusman
May 24, 2015 2:55 PM
According to the United States Defense Department, there are more than 200-thousand women serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.  Like their male counterparts, females have experiences that can be very traumatic.  VOA's Bernard Shusman tells us about a program that is helping some American women in the military heal through filmmaking.
Video

Video Female American Soldiers: Healing Through Filmmaking

According to the United States Defense Department, there are more than 200-thousand women serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.  Like their male counterparts, females have experiences that can be very traumatic.  VOA's Bernard Shusman tells us about a program that is helping some American women in the military heal through filmmaking.
Video

Video Rolling Thunder Run Reveals Changed Attitudes Towards Vietnam War

For many US war veterans, the Memorial Day holiday is an opportunity to look back at a divisive conflict in the nation’s history and to remember those who did not make it home.
Video

Video Millions Flock to Ethiopia Polls

Millions of Ethiopians cast their votes Sunday in the first national election since the 2012 death of longtime leader Meles Zenawi. Mr. Meles' party, the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front, is almost certain of victory again. VOA's Anita Powell reports from Addis Ababa.
Video

Video Scientists Testing Space Propulsion by Light

Can the sun - the heart of our solar system - power a spacecraft to the edge of our solar system? The answer may come from a just-launched small satellite designed to test the efficiency of solar sail propulsion. Once deployed, its large sail will catch the so-called solar wind and slowly reach what scientists hope to be substantial speed. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video FIFA Trains Somali Referees

As stability returns to the once lawless nation of Somalia, the world football governing body, FIFA, is helping to rebuild the country’s sport sector by training referees as well as its young footballers. Abdulaziz Billow has more from Mogadishu.
Video

Video With US Child Obesity Rates on the Rise, Program Promotes Health Eating

In its fifth year, FoodCorps puts more than 180 young Americans into 500 schools across the United States, where they focus on teaching students about nutrition, engaging them with hands-on activities, and improving their access to healthy foods whether in the cafeteria or the greater community. Aru Pande has more.
Video

Video Virginia Neighborhood Draws People to Nostalgic Main Street

In the U.S., people used to grow up in small towns with a main street lined by family-owned shops and restaurants. Today, however, many main streets are worn down and empty because shoppers have been lured away by shopping malls. But in the Del Ray neighborhood of Alexandria, Virginia, main street is thriving. VOA’s Deborah Block reports it has a nostalgic feel with its small restaurants and unique stores.
Video

Video Effort Underway to Limit Damage from California Oil Spill

Cleanup crews are working around the clock to remove oil from the waters off the coastal city of Santa Barbara, in California. About 380,000 liters of oil may have leaked out before a rupture in an onshore, underground pipeline was discovered Tuesday. The environmental disaster hit the popular West Coast resort area before the Memorial Day weekend. VOA's Zlatica Hoke reports investigators have yet to determine what caused the incident.

VOA Blogs