News / Africa

Egypt's Top Judges Resist Morsi Decrees

Egyptian protesters gather outside the country's high court in Cairo, Egypt, Nov. 24, 2012.
Egyptian protesters gather outside the country's high court in Cairo, Egypt, Nov. 24, 2012.
Edward Yeranian
— Egypt's judiciary has joined the growing opposition to a recent set of decrees by President Mohamed Morsi, which have provoked public outrage. And judges in Alexandria have announced they will go on strike to protest the decrees. 

Egypt's highest judicial body, the Supreme Judicial Council, is condemning the decrees granting President Mohamed Morsi sweeping powers, branding them “an unprecedented attack” on the independence of the judiciary.  And a broad spectrum of Egypt's judiciary is expressing support for the country's outgoing judicial head, Abdel Mejid Mahmoud, who was fired by the president Thursday.

Former Prosecutor General Abdel Mejid Mahmoud speaks to reporters in Cairo, Nov. 24, 2012.
Former Prosecutor General Abdel Mejid Mahmoud speaks to reporters in Cairo, Nov. 24, 2012.

Mahmoud received a standing ovation by members of Egypt's Judge's Club, after telling them that he will appeal the president's decision to the judiciary. Mahmoud said he will insist on the application of all legal articles, including those that deal with the powers of the judiciary and the position of general prosecutor.  

At the same time that Mahmoud was receiving the applause of his fellow judges, newly named General Prosecutor Talaat Ibrahim Abdallah told a press conference that he will remain impartial towards both those who oppose and support him. Abdallah said that he will not take sides in the current judicial political divide and remains equidistant from all parties, including those in favor of and against his nomination.

Judges in Egypt's second largest city of Alexandria also announced that they would hold a work stoppage until President Morsi withholds the decrees which have fueled a firestorm. Twenty six political parties and three former presidential candidates back a widespread protest movement in Cairo's Tahrir Square, where thousands of demonstrators massed Friday.

Prominent Egyptian democracy advocate Mohammed ElBaradei has called on Egypt's president to rescind the near absolute powers he has granted himself. The Nobel laureate addressed crowds gathered in Cairo's central square on Saturday.

Said Sadek, who teaches political sociology at the American University in Cairo, said the president has pushed all but his most loyal supporters to turn against him.

"Now, the president is becoming more and more isolated," Sadek said. "Yesterday, when he was giving the speech in front of his own presidential palace, only Muslim Brotherhood people and Salafis attended, while in Tahrir Square you had the people, the groups that led the revolution, and they are all against this new constitutional proclamation."

Sadek went on to call Morsi's controversial decrees “a poisoned cake full of dictatorship or autocratic rule.”  He said those decrees are a “cover-up for the Muslim Brotherhood taking over the country and creating a theocratic state.”

Revolutionary forces opposed to the president's move have called for a new popular protest in Tahrir Square on Tuesday.  Some demonstrators have set up a tent camp in the square reminiscent of last year's popular protests against the government of ousted president Hosni Mubarak.  Partisans of Mr. Morsi are also calling for a demonstration to support him Sunday.

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by: ali baba from: new york
November 24, 2012 9:50 PM
moresy decision is a clear indication of abusing the power. he has a plan to convert the country into islamic state by any means necessary. he want to convert the country into islamic state on the expenses of moderate muslim and liberal and christain. . he did not understand that his plan will have severe negative impact on economy. eventually wesern country especially europen countries and us will lose trust on him and all the aids to the country will dry up .tourist will not visit a country that turn into stone age for the sake of islam


by: Nikos Retsos from: Chicago, USA
November 24, 2012 7:17 PM
According to the top Egyptian newspaper, Ahram Online, November 24, 2012, the Egyptian Judiciary is divided between Judges who oppose Morsi, and Judges who support Morsi and accuse the opposing judges of "being lackeys of the former regime of Hosni Mubarak!

It is, therefore, fair to say that Egypt is not up in arms against Mr. Morsi as it is portrayed in the Western media hadlines. And, of course, there is El-Baradei, the loser of the Egyptian presidential election, who grabbed the opportunity to spit some sour grapes against Mr. Morsi.

The Egyptian people had a revolution, and the world must respect the leaders elected by the Egyptian people afterward in their first free and fair election in the Egyptian history! I sincerely feel that the Westerm media headlines are unfair to Mr. Morsi on their coverage of the current Egyptian events.
Nikos Retsos, retired professor

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