News / Middle East

Interim Egyptian President Sets Timetable for Elections

Cairo Merchants Seek Calm after Violencei
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July 09, 2013 12:28 AM
Egypt's fragile interim leadership is calling for calm after early morning clashes between the Muslim Brotherhood and the military left dead and wounded on the streets of Cairo. Sharon Behn reports from the Egyptian capital that each side is blaming the other for the violence, while shopkeepers are just hoping for a return to law and order.

Watch a related report by VOA's Sharon Behn

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Egypt's interim president has set a timetable for the country to hold parliamentary elections early next year followed by a presidential ballot.
 
In a decree issued Monday, Adly Mansour said a referendum will take place within five months to ratify amendments to the country's constitution.
 
After that, according to the decree, parliamentary elections will happen within two months and a date for a presidential vote will be announced once the new chamber convenes.
 
Last week, Egypt's army suspended the Islamist-drafted constitution with the overthrow of President Mohamed Morsi, following massive protests against his rule.
 
Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood called for more protests on Tuesday, after 51 people died Monday in clashes between the military and supporters of Morsi in Cairo.  Military officials said one soldier was among the dead.
 
The clashes took place near the Republican Guard headquarters. Muslim Brotherhood officials said the army opened fire without reason, killing men, women and children.  A military spokesman said troops fired only after coming under heavy gunfire from what he described as terrorists trying to storm the building. 
 
The army and Muslim Brotherhood are accusing each other of provoking the violence. 
 
Mansour has called for restraint and has ordered a judicial investigation.
  
In Washington, White House spokesman Jay Carney said the U.S. is concerned by the increasing violence and what he called a "dangerous level of political polarization" in Egypt.  He also said cutting off aid to Egypt would not be in Washington's best interests.  Egypt is the second-largest recipient of U.S. financial assistance behind Israel. 
 
Egypt's army announced Morsi's removal from power last Thursday.  The army described the move as necessary to enforce the will of the millions of people who have repeatedly demanded his resignation. But the Muslim Brotherhood called the action a military coup.

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by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
July 09, 2013 3:07 AM
I hope it would be at least avoided pubric division ends up in a civil war. It is reported ex-president Morsi was supported by Muslim brotherhood and about 90 percent of Egyptians are Muslim. This is my question that if most of Muslim Egyptians support Muslim brotherhood. In other words, I would like to know how much Muslim brotherhood occupy in the number of general people. I suppose not all of Muslims support Muslim brotherhood because Morsi got votes only a little more than half at the last election. If so, it seems difficult for Morsi to come back to the seat even with the defence from Brotherhood.

In Response

by: Nada El Basyounee from: Egypt
July 09, 2013 8:55 AM
They're only one million out of 90 million. And they represent an extremist view of islam, rather than the loving , peaceful ways our prophet lived by and taught the first muslims (He also taught equality between all religions, genders, and people). And they auction alcohol, which is forbidden in islam (the alcohol, auctioning anything is okay) People only picked him, since the other option was from the old regime, and if anyone from the old regime became president , it would be an insult to those who died for change and render the revolution useless. Many refused to vote, and in Egypt it is quite easy to cheat in elections. 20 percent of Egypt are either in poverty, or starving and sleeping in the streets and will sell their vote for a meal. So you can buy a fifth of the voters.

There are 33 millions protesters and fortunately the military stepped in to fulfill their demands. In addition, two years later, we now know that its was the Muslim Brotherhood who broke out prisoners from jails and unleashed them on protesters. But fortunately many believe that the Brotherhood is the way to Islamic law.

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