News / Africa

Egyptians Vote in 2nd Day of Presidential Election

An Egyptian man cast his vote inside a polling station in Old Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012. An Egyptian man cast his vote inside a polling station in Old Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012.
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An Egyptian man cast his vote inside a polling station in Old Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012.
An Egyptian man cast his vote inside a polling station in Old Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012.
VOA News
Egyptians voted in the second day of a historic presidential election Thursday that broadly pits Islamist candidates against secularists rooted in former President Hosni Mubarak's old guard.



The government declared Thursday a holiday to give people more time to cast ballots.

But VOA correspondent Elizabeth Arrott says turnout in the Cairo area appears to be weaker Thursday, the second and final day of voting.

"Anecdotally, it seems a little bit lighter than yesterday. One polling place that we'd gone by yesterday morning at the same time had lines around the block. Today, just a handful of people were there," she said. "It seems like a lot of people went yesterday so it could be expected that it would be lighter today."

Election monitors said Wednesday's polling was mostly peaceful as millions of Egyptians lined up to cast ballots in a vote that is expected to produce the country's first freely elected civilian president after 60 years of military-backed leadership.

  • Female Egyptians cast their votes during the second day of presidential elections in Cairo, May 24, 2012.
  • Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter shakes hands with an official from Al-Azhar in Cairo May 24, 2012. Carter is in Egypt as part of the mission of his Carter Center to monitor presidential elections.
  • An Egyptian man checks a list of voters in the country's presidential election at a polling site in the Zamalek neighborhood of Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012.
  • Post-revolution pride is on display outside voting stations, Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012. (Y. Weeks/VOA)
  • An Egyptian man holds a poster of former prime minister and presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq, with Arabic that reads " Egypt for all", in front of a wall sprayed with anti-police graffiti in Cairo, May 22, 2012.
  • An Egyptian man cast his vote inside a polling station in Old Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012.
  • Islamic presidential candidate Mohamed Mursi arrives to a polling station to cast his vote in Al-Sharqya, 60 km (37 miles) northeast of Cairo, May 23, 2012.
  • Egyptian presidential candidate Amr Moussa shows his ink-stained finger after casting his vote at a polling station in Cairo May 23, 2012.
  • Presidential candidate Abdel Moneim Abol Fotouh waves outside a polling station in Cairo May 23, 2012.
  • Women came with their children to take part in the historic poll, Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012. (Y. Weeks/VOA)
  • Egyptian voters line up to cast ballots in a southern suburb of Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012.
  • An Egyptian woman inks her finger after casting her vote during the first day of the presidential election in polling center in Alexandria, Egypt, May 23, 2012.
  • A polling station official waits for the next voter, Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012. (Y. Weeks/VOA)
  • An Egyptian woman shows her inked after casting her vote during the first day of the presidential election in a polling station in Alexandria, Egypt, May 23, 2012.
  • Women line up waiting to cast their vote at a polling station in Cairo May 23, 2012.
  • Ahmed Maher, a co-founder of the April 6 Revolutionary Movement, waits in line to vote at a polling center in a southern suburb of Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012.
  • An Egyptian woman casts her vote during the first day of the presidential election in a polling center in Alexandria, Egypt, May 23, 2012.
  • Poll workers check IDs against voter lists, Cairo, Egypt, May 23, 2012. (Y. Weeks/VOA)
  • Men cast their vote at a polling station in Cairo May 23, 2012.

The vote comes 15 months after President Mubarak resigned amid massive protests.

In the runup to the election, Egypt's unreliable polls fluctuated greatly, with four of the 12 candidates bouncing around the top spots.  

The two secular front-runners are both veterans of Mubarak's regime - former prime minister Ahmed Shafiq and former foreign minister Amr Moussa.

The main Islamist contenders are Mohamed Morsi of the powerful Muslim Brotherhood and Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh, a moderate whose inclusive platform has won him the support of some liberals, leftists and minority Christians.

As a dissident former Brotherhood leader, Aboul Fotouh has also won the backing of Egypt's ultraconservative Salafis, whose candidates won a quarter of the votes in recent parliamentary elections.

Morsi entered the race late but has benefited from the Brotherhood's powerful political machine. His victory would likely mean a greater emphasis on religion in government.

Aboul Fotouh argues that the Brotherhood should go back to its roots in preaching and charity and get out of party politics.

Both of their rivals, Moussa and Shafik, are campaigning as alternatives to Islamist domination, voices of experience and stability and the firm hands needed to blunt the lawlessness that has followed Mubarak's ouster.

Shafik has the support of Egypt's powerful military that has ruled the country in the 16 months since a popular revolt swept the former president from power.

A victory for one of the secularist candidates would mark a significant turn from parliamentary elections just six months ago when more than 70 percent of voters cast ballots for Islamist parties.

Preliminary first round results are not expected until Sunday.

A runoff is scheduled for June 16-17 between the two top finishers. The winner will be announced June 21.

Whoever wins faces massive challenges - the economy has collapsed as the key tourism industry dried up, crime has increased and labor strikes have proliferated.

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