News / Middle East

Egyptian Security Forces Fire Teargas at Student Protests

Protesters block a road during clashes with riot police in front of Al-Azhar University in Cairo October 20, 2013.
Protesters block a road during clashes with riot police in front of Al-Azhar University in Cairo October 20, 2013.
Reuters
Egyptian security forces fired bird shot and teargas to prevent supporters of deposed Islamist President Mohamed Morsi from marching on Sunday to the site of a protest camp that was destroyed two months ago, a Reuters witness said.
 
The crowd of about 100 people were students from Al-Azhar University, the historic seat of Sunni Muslim learning. They threw rocks at riot police stationed outside the gates of the university, and police threw the stones back.
 
The university is in the same Cairo suburb as the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque, scene of one of two pro-Mursi protest camps crushed by security forces on August 14. Hundreds of protesters were killed.
 
"Rabaa Square is completely off-limits," a security source said. "Protesters are not allowed to move inside it." A separate security source said 11 students had been arrested.
 
Authorities have cracked down hard on Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood. The group was outlawed by a court order after the army overthrew Morsi and installed an interim government in July following massive street protests a year after his election.
 
Brotherhood leaders, including Morsi, have been arrested on charges of inciting or taking part in violence.
 
Brotherhood supporters say they will keep protesting until the army-backed government falls. But demonstrations are far smaller than the ones that immediately followed Morsi's downfall.
 
The Interior Ministry said in a statement that security forces took action after 3,000 students blocked roads around the Al-Azhar campus.
 
A few police trucks kept students from moving beyond the front entrance of the facility.
 
"We want the return of legitimate rule to Egypt, we want the return of President Morsi" said Mohamed Magdi, a commerce student. "We are unarmed students. We just approached them and said 'you are our police' and then they attacked us."
 
The students had been protesting for the second day on campus in support of Morsi. Graffiti scrawled on university buildings condemned General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, the army chief who toppled Morsi, as a murderer and traitor.
 
"We will take measures to continue studies even with the continuation of the demonstrations," said Ibrahim el-Hadud, a university official.
 
The army rejects allegations from the Brotherhood that it deposed Morsi in a coup and says it was responding to the will of the people.
 
The government refers to the Brotherhood as "terrorists" and does not distinguish between the movement and al Qaeda-affiliated groups in the lawless Sinai Peninsula who carry out almost daily attacks on security forces.
 
The Brotherhood describes itself as a peaceful movement.

  • A member of the Egyptian security forces speaks to a woman holding a stick as they clear a sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, at the smaller of the two camps, near the Cairo University campus in Giza, Cairo, Egypt, August 14, 2014.
  • Supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi surround a burning police car during clashes with Egyptian security forces in Cairo's Mohandessin neighborhood, Egypt,  August 14, 2013. 
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi chant slogans against Egyptian Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi during clashes with Egyptian security forces in Cairo's Mohandessin neighborhood, Egypt, August 14, 2013. 
  • A police vehicle is pushed off of the 6th of October bridge by protesters close to the largest sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo, Egypt,  August 14, 2013.
  • A member of the Egyptian security forces holds up a copy of the Quran as clear they clear the smaller of the two sit-ins by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, near the Cairo University campus in Giza, Cairo, Egypt, August 14, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi clash with the Egyptian security forces as the forces clear their sit-in camp in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo, Egypt, August 14, 2013. 
  • Makeshift wooden huts burn at a sit-in camp set up by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi as Egyptian security forces clear the camp near Cairo University in Cairo's Giza district, Egypt, August 14, 2013. 
  • Supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi carry another as Egyptian security forces clear a sit-in camp set up near Cairo University in Cairo's Giza district, Egypt, August 14, 2013. 
  • A protester comes to the aid of a wounded comrade as security forces clear a sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo, Egypt, August 14, 2013. 
  • Supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, stand among debris and smoke in background as they confront Egyptian security forces trying to clear the smaller of the two sit-ins, near the Cairo University campus in Giza, Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday,
  • Egyptian security forces clear a sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo, Egypt,  August 14, 2013. 
  • Protesters throw stones at Egyptian security forces trying to clear a sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo, Egypt,  August 14, 2013. 
  • Egyptian security forces detain protesters as they clear a sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo, Egypt, August 14, 2013. 
  • A wounded protester lies on the ground as Egyptian security forces clear the smaller of the two sit-ins by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, near the Cairo University campus in Giza, Cairo, Egypt, August 14, 2013.
  • A lightly wounded member of the Egyptian security forces talks with other officers as they clear sit-ins by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, near the Cairo University campus in Giza, Cairo, Egypt, August 14, 2013.
  • Fires burn as Egyptian security forces clear a sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo, Egypt,  Aug. 14, 2013. 

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Dastemeh from: Iran
October 21, 2013 3:29 PM
just remember - America - Egyptian Copts are still ARABS!!!!

do not make the mistake that they are somehow Christians American style... NO... these are still Arabs... and you remember what Arab "Christians" did in Lebanon... Sabra and Shatilla... remember...????


by: Anonymous from: Chipinge zimbabwe
October 21, 2013 12:51 AM
The military started something they wil never b able to finish,the wil of the pple were the elections that voted Morsi his brotherhood into pwer his tenure should hv run its course til nxt election.come by the gun go by gun

In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
October 21, 2013 9:11 AM
morsi will rotten in jail as well all Muslim brotherhood


by: Charlie from: California
October 20, 2013 7:12 PM
I have commented many times in news stories against Al Sisi and the junta. But today three people were shot to death in a drive-by outside a Cairo church. The Brotherhood is between a rock and a very, very hard place but if they are harboring Christian killers then they will lose my support yesterday. Since I don't trust the junta, it is not impossible that the army isn't behind this but average Muslims in Egypt have attacked Christian often in the past , so... In any case the Brotherhood if it wants to keep what support in the West it has, needs to come out against this strongly and make a point of defending Christians. Nothing will play into Al Sisi's hands more than if they are able to blame the ousted government's supporters for this. It should not happen again.

In Response

by: Taimy from: Cairo
October 21, 2013 6:56 AM
Egyptian Junta is as evil and sinister as it can get. It could well be their conspiracy. But it could well be other extremists. Note that were NO anti-Christians acts at ANY level under Morsi. We should support democracy in Egypt, not any personality. The legitimate president happens to be Morsi, and this army junta is evil and shameless. You could see how they killed protesters. ust stay put supporting democracy and rule of law.

In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
October 20, 2013 8:42 PM
Muslim brotherhood are targeting churches and Christian for decades . their behavior which is marked by haltered to Christianity and western civilization is well established and continue


by: ali baba from: new york
October 20, 2013 5:30 PM
Muslim Brotherhood are desperate and they are looking for any means to destabilize Egypt. Their strategy is vicious and unconscious . They do not care that the country is a very economic crisis and these activities could hurt the economy and the poor Egyptian suffer, they are fanatic whom they are destroying the country . they did it in Syria . they did it in Sudan. .they did it in Afghanistan and Pakistan It is international terrorism that challenge the civilized world.

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