News / Middle East

Egypt Swears In Interim President

Adly Mansour (C), Egypt's chief justice and head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, speaks at his swearing in ceremony as the nation's interim president in Cairo July 4, 2013.
Adly Mansour (C), Egypt's chief justice and head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, speaks at his swearing in ceremony as the nation's interim president in Cairo July 4, 2013.
Sharon Behn
The chief justice of Egypt's supreme constitutional court has been named president, after the military ousted democratically-elected President Mohamed Morsi only a year into his term.

Constitutional court Chief Justice Adly Mansour was sworn in as the new interim president on Thursday, following days of street demonstrations against Islamist leader Morsi.

Adly Mansour (C), Egypt's chief justice and head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, speaks at his swearing in ceremony as the nation's interim president in Cairo, July 4, 2013.Adly Mansour (C), Egypt's chief justice and head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, speaks at his swearing in ceremony as the nation's interim president in Cairo, July 4, 2013.
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Adly Mansour (C), Egypt's chief justice and head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, speaks at his swearing in ceremony as the nation's interim president in Cairo, July 4, 2013.
Adly Mansour (C), Egypt's chief justice and head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, speaks at his swearing in ceremony as the nation's interim president in Cairo, July 4, 2013.
 “I swear by Almighty God to uphold the republican system and respect the law and Constitution, and to fully safeguard the rights of the people, and safeguard the independence and integrity of the homeland," Mansour promised.

Some Morsi supporters describe his ouster as a coup.

Analysts described the action as a clear rejection of Morsi's conservative religious leanings. The ousted leader was strongly supported by the once-banned Muslim Brotherhood.

Lawyer Hassan Mahmoud Soliman was in Tahrir Square, the center of the uprising.  “Look, Egypt has always been a moderate country," he noted. "We have never been a secular country or a religious one. We always wanted Egypt to be moderate.  What has happened is for the good of all of Egypt. We are an ancient and moderate civilization, we have always been this way, and we will remain this way forever."

Army chief Abdul Fatah Khalil al-Sisi on Wednesday laid out a roadmap for the country, including a panel to review Egypt's now-suspended constitution, a national reconciliation committee, and elections for a new president and parliament.

The Muslim Brotherhood, which had vowed to defend Morsi to the death, has been quiet.  Many of its leaders have been banned from leaving the country.

The former president is being held at a military compound.

Related video report by Jeff Seldin:
Egypt Embarks On Do-Over, Officials Promise Fairnessi
X
July 04, 2013 10:25 PM
Egypt has a new interim leader and a roadmap designed by the military to unite the country after the ouster of Islamist President Mohamed Morsi. Officials say the goal is to make good on the promises of the uprising that forced former, long-time leader Hosni Mubarak from power two years ago. VOA's Jeff Seldin has more.

Prosecutors have issued arrest warrants for 300 members of Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood, including some of its top leaders. Police arrested Brotherhood supreme leader Mohammed Badie Wednesday in the coastal city of Marsa Matrouh and brought him back to Cairo.

Authorities say he is wanted for the deaths of eight protesters outside the Brotherhood's Cairo headquarters. Judicial officials also say they will open an investigation next week against Morsi and other Brotherhood members on charges of insulting the military.

Australian National University Egyptian scholar Adel Abdel Ghafar, who is currently in Cairo, said he does not expect a violent backlash to Morsi's removal from office.

“I think the majority of Egyptians from low-income to middle-income earners are really focused on putting food on the table and getting back to work," Ghafar said."The country has been on hold for a few days and the economy is already suffering. I think the majority of the people are really keen on getting back to work and getting some stability.”

In Cairo's Tahrir Square, crowds were still waving flags and celebrating president Morsi's ouster, whistling and cheering as Egypt's air force flew overhead  forming a giant white heart in the sky.

  • A supporter of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi chants slogans during a rally near Cairo University after Friday prayers in Cairo, Egypt, July 5, 2013. 
  • Opponents of Egypt's ousted president Mohammed Morsi wave national flags and posters showing Lt. Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi in Tahrir Square, Cairo, July 5, 2013. 
  • Palestinian Hamas security guard stands near an Egyptian watch tower on the border with Egypt in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, July 5, 2013. An Egyptian official said the country's border crossing with Gaza Strip in northern Sinai has been closed indefinitely.
  • Protesters, who support former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, perform Friday prayers near Cairo University in Cairo, July 5, 2013. 
  • A supporter of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi holds up a copy of the Koran as she and others march near Cairo University after Friday prayers in Cairo, July 5, 2013. 
  • A supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi cries during a protest near the University of Cairo, Giza, July 5, 2013.
  • Adly Mansour gestures at his swearing in ceremony as the nation's interim president in Cairo, July 4, 2013.
  • This image made from Egyptian State Television shows Egypt's interim president Adly Mansour, center, standing with judges during a swearing in ceremony at the constitutional court in Cairo, July 4, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted president Mohammed Morsi show victory signs during a rally, in Nasser City, Cairo, July 4, 2013.
  • An Egyptian Army commander talks to citizens while securing the area near Cairo University, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters gathered to support ousted president Mohammed Morsi in Cairo, July 4, 2013.
  • Egyptians celebrate after Egypt's chief justice Adly Mansour is sworn in as the nation's interim president, July 4, 2013. Arabic reads, " bye bye Morsi."
  • Egyptian military jets fly over Cairo as the head of Egypt's constitutional court Adly Mansour was sworn in as interim head of state, July 4, 2013.
  • Opponents of Egypt's ousted president Mohamed Morsi celebrate outside the presidential palace in Cairo, July 3, 2013.
  • Fireworks light the sky moments after Egypt's military chief said the president was being replaced by the chief justice of the constitutional court, Cairo, July 3, 2013.
  • Morsi supporters react after the Egyptian army's statement was read out on state TV, at the Raba El-Adwyia mosque square in Cairo, July 3, 2013.

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Comments
     
by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
July 05, 2013 2:13 AM
I have heard the last Egyptian revolution forbided religious groups to engage in politics. Morsi seems ousted because he failed to be keeping away from the influences of Brotherhood in administraing policies this time. I wonder if separation between politics and religion is impossible in Islam countries. Is there any Islam country where politics is dealt with no influence of Islam?

by: Dr. Malek Towghi from: USA
July 05, 2013 1:07 AM
"I swear by Almighty God to uphold the ...... law and constitution ..." (Adly Mansour)

Mr. Adly, By replacing a constitutionally elected president of the country without any legal and constitutional basis you are already violating the law and constitution of the land -- and thus, committing treason.

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 04, 2013 12:47 PM
We are looking forward to a man who will correct the errors of Mohamed Morsi. A man of justice, a solicitor, a head of constitutional Egypt should understand what is expected of Egypt. Morsi was so parochial in following the agenda of the Muslim Brotherhood only to the exclusion of the demands of his office. Since he wants to be an imam, time has been paved for him to go deeper into his religion and perhaps teach his adherents that his stint in the civilized world - that is studying in the US - was an aberration. Perhaps he may need to open a school of extremist islamist studies, for that is what he is best suited for, not a country's president in the 21st century.

by: Michael from: USA
July 04, 2013 8:10 AM
The Morsi Constitution absented protection of individuals understood in the West as consultation with colleagues in a free state, rather than the Egyptian body of the Moslem Brotherhood which was unfortunately trans-outlook in it's policy

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