News / Middle East

    Egypt Protests Continue Despite Deadline to Disperse

    Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shout slogans and hold up posters during a rally marching back towards Rabaa al-Adawiya Square where they are camping, in Cairo, August 2, 2013.
    Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shout slogans and hold up posters during a rally marching back towards Rabaa al-Adawiya Square where they are camping, in Cairo, August 2, 2013.
    Heather Murdock
    Despite reports of fresh violence in Egypt's capital and military orders to disband, supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi again came out en masse Friday night, saying the order to leave the protest camps has only made them more determined to stay put.
     
    This protest coordinated by the Muslim Brotherhood is relatively quiet before demonstrators break their daily Ramadan fast, but the crowds are thick, with more people coming in from every direction.  
     
    Speeches blare on loudspeakers and crowds gather around a stage decorated with flags and posters of Morsi.
     
    Seham Hussein said she and her family come to the camp almost every day to support Morsi, who remains detained after being thrown out of office July 3.
     
    She said the order to leave the camp, and even the promise of safe passage out, has not deterred her family, or anyone else. Her 16-year-old daughter, Abeer, wears a pin that says,“Down with military rule” in Arabic.
     
    There are fears of violence if police go ahead with plans to dismantle the tent camps. Earlier in the day, there were reports of clashes between Muslim Brotherhood supporters of Morsi and the police.
     
    Police on Friday ordered a blockade around protest camps and gave anti-military protesters 48 hours to leave peacefully.
     
    But Abeer said children are protected by the dozens of guards checking bags and searching for weapons at protest entrances, which are piled high with sandbags. Besides, she said, demonstrations are where children learn to stand up for their rights.
     
    Across town, in Tahrir Square, crowds are thin, because no specific demonstration in favor of Army Chief Abdel Fattah el-Sissi was called. Vendors were out, though, offering food, Egyptian flag face painting, and flags. Pro-military crowds often gather in Tahrir Square on Friday nights, even if no event has been organized.
     
    Fifteen-year-old Eslam said he has been living in Tahrir Square for months. He stands near a display showing a wedding dress with an Egyptian flag where the bride’s face would be, placed next to a picture of Sissi on top of a suit. The display symbolizes Egypt’s wedding to the general, and Eslam said Sissi saved Egypt from Islamist rule.

    Outside the pro-Morsi camp, however, protester Gilel Ahmed said that regardless of whether people like Morsi, he was elected fairly.
     
    “I’m over 60 years [old]. I would like to see my country go for democracy. I don’t care about Morsi. I care about my democracy. I care about freedom. I care about what Egypt deserves,” said Ahmed.
     
    Ahmed enters a pro-Morsi camp wearing a T-shirt that says, “I love Egypt,” which is strikingly similar to shirts available for sale in the pro-military camp in Tahrir Square.

    • People perform Ramadan night prayers in Cairo, celebrating Lailat al-Qadr (the Night of Power), August 4, 2013.
    • A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi prays outside Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo, August 4, 2013.
    • The area around the Rabaa Adiweya mosque has been packed with Muslim Brotherhood supporters sleeping in tents for over a month. Families bring children to protect them from the police forcibly dismantling the sit-in. (H. Elrasam for VOA)
    • A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi prays outside Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo, August 4, 2013.
    • Children have been participating in protests in Egypt since the became widespread and near-constant in 2011. (H. Elrasam for VOA)
    • A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi gets relief from the afternoon heat with the help of water sprayers in front of a poster of Morsi, Cairo University,Giza, Egypt.
    • A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi cries while saluting the Egyptian flag at Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque, Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt.
    • An Egyptian woman feeds her ducks in front of a barrier recently set up by supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi in their camp in Giza, southwest of Cairo, Egypt, Aug. 1, 2013. 
    • An Egyptian child attends prayers with his father at a protest near Cairo University in Giza, Egypt, August 1, 2013. 
    • Egyptian children wear head bands with Arabic writing: "No god but Allah and Mohammed is the prophet." They attend a protest outside Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque, Cairo, Egypt.
    • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi pray at Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, where Morsi supporters have installed a camp and hold daily rallies at Nasr City, Cairo, July 31, 2013.
    • "Third Square" actvists, who promote a middle way in the rift between the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of the army's overthrow of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, gather at Sphinx Square in Cairo, July 30, 2013.
    • "Third Square" actvists gather at Sphinx Square in Cairo, July 30, 2013.
    • Supporters of Mohamed Morsi during a march from Al-Fath Mosque to the defense ministry in Cairo, July 30, 2013.
    • Flares illuminate the gathering of several hundred activists the "Third Square" in Cairo. (Hamada Elrasam for VOA)
    • A young girl at the Third Square rally in Cairo. (Hamada Elrasam for VOA)
    • A young girl at the Third Square rally in Cairo. (Hamada Elrasam for VOA)
    • A young girl at the Third Square rally in Cairo. (Hamada Elrasam for VOA)

    You May Like

    Leaving Scalia Replacement to 2017 Would Mean Unusually Long Vacancy

    History of high court shows Obama not in unique situation during final year of presidency

    US Fact Checkers Debunk Some Republican Presidential Candidate Claims 

    Slim evidence for several claims made by Republican presidential candidates at their last debate ahead of next Saturday's key nominating election in South Carolina

    Uganda Presidential Debate a Small Victory for Democracy

    In homes and bars across country, Ugandans were fixated on their screens as eight political candidates running for president took part in national debate

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Godwin from: Nigeria
    August 03, 2013 8:00 AM
    Here something is becoming clearer - that Morsi is getting more and more unpopular by the day. At least his supporters have recognized that. Next they agree that El Sissi saved Egypt and is the happening man in Egypt now. That is another important milestone. Then we see that the pro-Morsi group is like a drowning man that will cling to straw. We should feel pity for them because they realize that the Muslim Brotherhood cannot win another victory in Egypt. But can someone tell them to do themselves a favor by dispersing now there may still be a little left to save their faces, because the longer they remain on the streets protesting, the more unpopular they become. The global opinion is that Egypt is best without Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood, and a greater majority in Egypt agrees with this, why will the muslim brotherhood continue to insist on something stale against the popular demand of the Egyptians? When the Brotherhood talks about democracy, did they forget what it meant when they had the opportunity to demonstrate to the world that they can be democratic? The ruled like the 12th century emperors, sidelining democracy - even the pharaohs of the time were better. Now they talk about democracy as if they understand what that mandate they fouled up entailed. It is like gold to the pig, give them another opportunity and they will still trample on it, making the best of it to marginalize the rest of Egyptians.

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    New Technology Aims to Bring Election Transparency to Ugandai
    X
    Serginho Roosblad
    February 12, 2016 9:29 PM
    A team of recent graduates from Uganda’s Makerere University has created a mobile application designed to help monitor elections and expose possible rigging. The developers say the app, called E-Poll, will make Uganda's democratic process fairer. From Kampala, VOA's Serginho Roosblad reports.
    Video

    Video New Technology Aims to Bring Election Transparency to Uganda

    A team of recent graduates from Uganda’s Makerere University has created a mobile application designed to help monitor elections and expose possible rigging. The developers say the app, called E-Poll, will make Uganda's democratic process fairer. From Kampala, VOA's Serginho Roosblad reports.
    Video

    Video Refugees in Kenya Vie to Compete in Rio Olympics

    In Kenya, refugees from other African nations are training at a special camp and competing for a limited number of slots in this year's Rio Olympics under the flag of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). As Lenny Ruvaga reports from Ngong, this is a first in Olympic history.
    Video

    Video Gateway to Mecca: Historical Old Jeddah

    Local leader Sami Nawar's family has been in the Old City of Jeddah for hundreds of years and takes us on a tour of this ancient route to Mecca, also believed to be the final resting place of Adam's wife, Eve.
    Video

    Video Two-thirds of World Faces Water Shortage

    Four billion people — or two out of every three on the planet — do not have enough water to meet their basic needs. That is far greater than previously thought, according to a new study that presents a more accurate picture of the problem. As VOA's Rosanne Skirble reports, the findings will help policymakers and the public craft solutions to address the threat.
    Video

    Video As Refugees Perish, Greek Graveyards Fill

    Aid workers on the Greek island of Lesbos say they are struggling to bury the increasing number of bodies of refugees that have been recovered or washed up ashore in recent months.  The graveyards are all full, they say, yet as tens of thousands of people clamor to get out of Syria, it is clear refugees will still be coming in record numbers. For VOA, Hamada Elrasam reports from Lesbos, Greece.
    Video

    Video Russia Bristles at NATO Expansion in E. Europe

    Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov is meeting Friday with the head of NATO after the Western military alliance and the United States announced plans for the biggest military build-up in Europe since the Cold War. Russia has called NATO's moves a threat to stability in Europe. But NATO says the troop rotations and equipment are aimed at reassuring allies concerned about Russia as VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Moscow.
    Video

    Video To Fight Zika, Scientists Target Mosquitoes

    Mosquitoes strike again. The Zika virus outbreak is just the latest headline-grabbing epidemic carried by these biting pests, but researchers are fighting back with new ways to control them. VOA's Steve Baragona takes a look.
    Video

    Video Mosul Refugees Talk About Life Under IS

    A top U.S. intelligence official told Congress this week that a planned Iraqi-led operation to re-take the city of Mosul from Islamic State militants is unlikely to take place this year. IS took over the city in June 2014, and for the past year and a half, Mosul residents have been held captive under its rule. VOA's Zana Omar talked to some families who managed to escape. Bronwyn Benito narrates his report.
    Video

    Video Scientists Make Progress Toward Better Diabetes Treatment, Cure

    Scientists at two of the top U.S. universities say they have made significant advances in their quest to find a more efficient treatment for diabetes and eventually a cure. According to the International Diabetes Federation, the disease affects more than 370 million people worldwide. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video NATO to Target Migrant Smugglers

    NATO has announced plans to send warships to the Aegean Sea to target migrant smugglers in the alliance's most direct intervention so far since a wave of people began trying to reach European shores.
    Video

    Video Used Books Get a New Life on the Streets of Lagos

    Used booksellers are importing books from abroad and selling them on the streets of Africa's largest city. What‘s popular with readers may surprise you. Chris Stein reports from Lagos.
    Video

    Video After NH Primaries All Eyes on South Carolina

    After Tuesday's primary in New Hampshire, US presidential candidates swiftly turned to the next election coming up in South Carolina. The so-called “first-in-the-South” poll may help further narrow down the field of candidates. Zlatica Hoke reports.
    Video

    Video Smartphone Helps Grow Vegetables

    One day, you may be using your smartphone to grow your vegetables. A Taipei-based company has developed a farm cube — a small, enclosed ecosystem designed to grow plants indoors. The environment inside is automatically adjusted by the cube, but it can also be controlled through an app. VOA's Deborah Block has more on the gardening system.
    Video

    Video Exhibit Turns da Vinci’s Drawings Into Real Objects

    In addition to being a successful artist, Renaissance genius Leonardo da Vinci designed many practical machines, some of which are still in use today, although in different forms. But a number of his projects were never realized — until today. VOA’s George Putic reports.