News / Africa

Egyptian Army Chief Warns of State Collapse

Egyptian protesters celebrate the capture of a state security armored vehicle that demonstrators commandeered during clashes with security forces and brought to Tahrir Square in Cairo, January 29, 2013.
Egyptian protesters celebrate the capture of a state security armored vehicle that demonstrators commandeered during clashes with security forces and brought to Tahrir Square in Cairo, January 29, 2013.
VOA News
The head of Egypt's military has warned that the country's political crisis could lead to the "collapse of the state."

Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, who also serves as defense minister, made the comments Tuesday in a speech to military academy cadets.

Sissi's warning followed a night of protests with hundreds of anti-government demonstrators packing the streets in Egyptian cities, ignoring state-of-emergency rules and a nighttime curfew meant to suppress riots.

Political analyst Rania el-Malki told VOA that the Egyptian military is trying to pacify the protesters.

"I think it's just a way of telling the people that we need to have some kind of calm, we need to maintain some kind of calm," she said. "To perhaps convince understandably angry young people that there has to be a peaceful way of expressing their anger or their frustration with the current administration, that the use of violence is going to lead us nowhere, and that we are all in the same boat."

Video footage of Egyptian protests

Egyptian Protests Jan. 29, 2013i
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January 29, 2013 12:47 PM
Anti-government protesters clash with police, defying president's state of emergency.

Egyptians defying the curfew gathered in Port Said, Ismailiya and Suez City after the measure took effect late Monday. VOA Cairo correspondent Elizabeth Arrott said the three flashpoint cities have strategic importance for the Egyptian government.

"These cities along the Suez canal are obviously a huge money earner for Egypt," Arrott said. "So they do not want to risk any chance of something happening there that would interrupt that flow of revenue or scare away investors even further or continue the unrest [that has been] keeping tourists away."

President Mohamed Morsi decreed the emergency regulations on Sunday after chairing a meeting of the National Defense Council, which includes civilian Cabinet ministers and senior military officers.

Morsi's Cabinet also approved a draft law allowing him to deploy the army to assist police in providing security, including arresting civilians.

In a gesture to his opponents, the president called for a national dialogue and invited opposition groups and politicians to join him for talks on Monday.

That effort failed, however, as the main opposition National Salvation Front and other opposition groups refused to take part in any talks under the current conditions.

Opposition balks

Former presidential candidate and Arab League head Amr Moussa told journalists that the opposition still seeks dialogue, even though it stayed away from Monday's meeting.

He said the opposition remains ready for dialogue and that dialogue need not lead to a predetermined result, and it is not true that the opposition is afraid of the possible results.

In contrast, Muslim Brotherhood political figure Pakinam El-Sharqawi told a press conference at the presidential palace Tuesday that the government is trying to facilitate an entente but is being frustrated by certain opposition leaders.

She said the ball is in the court of the opposition and that those leaders who attended the dialogue session do in fact represent many sectors of Egyptian society. She accused several key opposition leaders of changing their demands to avoid dialogue.

Latest Developments in Egypt

January 25: Violence erupts as protesters mark second anniversary of uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak
January 26: Armed forces deploy in Suez, riots erupt in Port Said after verdict issued in football case
January 27: President Mohamed Morsi declares 30-day state of emergency in three provinces
January 28: Protesters pack streets, defying emergency rules and curfews
January 29: Head of military warns the political crisis could lead to the "collapse of the state"
Arrott said the opposition coalition is facing growing criticism for its decisions.

"People are increasingly calling them out of touch," she said. "They said from the [beginning] they would not negotiate with the government without preconditions. One analyst I spoke to said [Egyptians] want someone to negotiate.  By their refusing, it only seems to polarize the situation and create this stalemate where nothing is going forward. So, there is frustration all around."

Military role

Analyst Malki said the relationship between the Islamist president and relatively secular army officers has become more cohesive.

"I think Morsi in his own way somehow managed to - I don't want to say co-opt - but I think he has managed to kind of bridge that gap that we all thought would continue to be there," she said. "It seems to be they are doing really well communicating."

Veteran Egyptian editor and publisher Hisham Qassem told VOA that he does not believe the current unrest will lead to a civil war, but that he thinks the Egyptian army will start taking a more prominent role in the crisis to rein in the situation.

“When it comes to deploying the military, I have no doubt the military will deploy if necessary," Qassem said. "But it cannot be read as a coup. I have no doubts that if there is turbulence, and it looks very likely that that will happen, that they will deploy, stabilize the country and do a repetition of the scenario we had two years ago.”

Almost 50 people have died since Thursday, when violence broke out during rallies marking the second anniversary of the uprising against former Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak.

Port Said has been the worst-hit area, with at least 37 people killed. Violence in the city escalated Saturday after a court sentenced 21 people to death for their involvement in a deadly football riot there last year.

Edward Yeranian contributed to this report from Cairo.

  • Pro and anti-government protesters throw stones during clashes near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, January 30, 2013.
  • Egyptian riot police arrest a man during clashes with protesters near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, January 30, 2013.
  • Protesters celebrate the capture of a state security armored vehicle that demonstrators commandeered during clashes with security forces and brought to nearby Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, January 28, 2013.
  • Protesters use camera phones to capture a burning state security armored vehicle that demonstrators commandeered, brought to Tahrir Square and set alight, Cairo, Egypt, January 28, 2013.
  • Egyptian riot police clash with protesters, not seen, near Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, January 27, 2013.
  • Egyptians carry the coffin of a man killed protests a day earlier in Port Said, Egypt, January 27, 2013.
  • Smoke rises after Egyptian protesters clash with police, unseen, in Port Said, Egypt, January 27, 2013.
  • A riot police officer gestures during clashes with protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi throwing stones at him near Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, January 25, 2013.
  • A protester opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi throws a tear gas canister, earlier thrown by riot police near Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, January 25, 2013.
  • Protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi throw stones towards riot police during clashes near Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, January 25, 2013.

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Comments
     
by: Bassam Eissa from: Egypt
January 29, 2013 11:13 PM
President Mohamed Mursi is to leave Egypt's political crisis behind him on Wednesday with a short trip to Germany to beg for urgently needed money and foreign investment and convince Europe of his Muslim Brotherhood "European Liberal democratic" credentials and convince UK, France and Belgium of Egyptian solid stability and increased prosperity in the lucrative Egyptian space technology, satellite communications, remote imaging and advanced cancer research... with Humus


by: Suliman from: Saudi Arabia
January 29, 2013 12:57 PM
I can tell you Mr Plack, that Arabs do appreciate Israel very much. we can't say it publically... but privately we know that she will not allow Iran to dominate or abuse us. she will not allow France to collude with Turkey to invade Syria... and she will protect Egypt against foreign invaders... and let me tell you, there are all sorts of ways we show our appreciation which are not apparent to people that are not born to the desert customs

In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
January 29, 2013 2:50 PM
I understand how Arab haltered to Israel but any war could have negative impact especially Egypt . Egypt have no resources and Saudi Arabia view is not in the Egyptian consideration . Egyptian want to live. Egyptian does not want a war even these radical imam are calling for war


by: Hanz Planck from: Germany
January 29, 2013 12:05 PM
i doubt if American fighter jets or cutting edge Tanks could do much harm in the hands of the Egyptian... Israel will make sure to take out that contingency out of circulation before it becomes a weapon in the suppression of the Egyptian People. sometimes i wonder if Arabs appreciate that tiny neighbor of theirs...


by: ali baba from: new york
January 29, 2013 11:40 AM
if the possibility of state collapse .what happen for the American fighter just shipped last week. this give proof positive that American policy maker had made bad decision .. American fighter would be to the wrong hand


by: Davis K. Thanjan from: New York
January 29, 2013 11:19 AM
Egypt is going through crisis in full circle. Mubarack was a dictator with the full support of the military. Once he was removed from power Morsi came to power under the banner of Moslem Brotherhood.

The actions of Morsi were much worse than that of Mubarack. Morsi is a dictator representing the international terrorist organization of Muslim Brotherhood. He usurped more dictatorial powers than Mubarack. More civilians were killed by the Morsi administration than the civilian lives lost for the removal of Mubarack. Mubarack is under prosecution for the death of civilians during the last days of his administration. It is time for Morsi to be removed from power and indicted for the same crimes done by Mubarack.

The obsevations of the Defense Minister and head of the military is significant. The crisis in Egypt could lead to the collapse of the state. Is it a warning for military intervention in Egypt if there is collapse of the state? The survival of Egypt is dependent on the military and a new constitution.


by: Mark from: USA
January 29, 2013 9:46 AM
you shouldn't be stunned...Devatogolo... both the Muslim brotherhood and the Baath party patterned themselves on the worst examples of depraved cult fascism - Nazism and Stalinism.


by: Devatuoglou from: Turkey
January 29, 2013 8:53 AM
The Obama support of the Muslim Brotherhood has stunned the Middle East. It is like America suddenly embraced the murderous Baath Party and praised its achievements. the difference between the Baath and the Muslim Brotherhood is that the Baath was a political organization who employed revolting terrorism to impose its will, whereas the Muslim Brotherhood is a terrorist organization with political aspirations.

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