News / Middle East

Egyptian PM to Offer Cabinet Posts to Islamists

Egyptians Divided on Way Forwardi
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July 09, 2013 9:19 PM
Egypt's interim president Adly Mansour has announced a timetable for parliamentary and presidential elections in a bid to move the country forward and away from a cycle of violence. Sharon Behn reports from Cairo that while those who supported the overthrow of President Mohamed Morsi's government will welcome the decision. But Muslim Brotherhood supporters have vowed to continue their protests to reinstate the Islamist leader.
Watch a related report by VOA's Sharon Behn
VOA News
Egypt's newly appointed interim prime minister Hazem el-Biblawi begins work Wednesday forming his Cabinet, which state-run media say includes plans to offer posts to the Muslim Brotherhood and the Islamist Nour Party.

Interim leaders are moving ahead on a fast-track political transition for Egypt that includes steps to amend the country's constitution and hold new parliamentary and presidential elections.

The Muslim Brotherhood and the Nour Party are part of a broad set of groups criticizing the transition plan, which interim President Adly Mansour laid out days after the military ousted President Mohamed Morsi.

The main liberal group, the National Salvation Front, said Wednesday it was not consulted on the plan and disagreed with certain elements.  The Tamarud youth movement also says it was not consulted, and both groups plan to propose changes to the road map.

The Muslim Brotherhood objects to the formation of an interim government and demands that Mr. Morsi be reinstated.  Spokesmen for the group said Wednesday they reject any offer to join the new administration.

U.S. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said Tuesday the United States has been in touch with the Muslim Brotherhood and is encouraging it to take part in the transition. She said any process in Egypt must be inclusive.

El-Biblawi is an economist and former Egyptian finance minister.  Mansour named him interim prime minister on Tuesday, along with selecting reformist leader and Nobel Peace Prize winner Mohammed ElBaradei as vice president.

Also Tuesday, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia pledged to give Egypt billions of dollars in aid.

Meanwhile, the military and Muslim Brotherhood continue to blame each other for Monday's violence, which killed at least 51 people.  

The Brotherhood says the army opened fire on Morsi supporters. The military says troops shot only after coming under gunfire from terrorists trying to storm a military headquarters in Cairo.

London-based Amnesty International said evidence it gathered suggests security forces have used "excessive force" against protesters.  The group said protesters Monday may have used violence, but that the military's response was "disproportionate."

Joe Stork of the U.S.-based Human Rights Watch tells VOA that his group is extremely concerned about what is going on in Egypt. It is calling on all sides to refrain from violence. Stork says the rights group has a team on the ground in Cairo and plans to offer a preliminary report Wednesday.

  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi perform weekly Friday prayers at the Rabaa Adawiya square in Cairo where they are camping, July 12, 2013.
  • A supporter of Morsi is doused with water on a hot day in Cairo, July 12, 2013.
  • Supporters of the ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shout anti-army slogans during a sit-in protest in Cairo July 11, 2013.
  • Morsi Supporters pray after breaking their fast during Ramadan, in Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, July 11, 2013.
  • An Egyptian boy stands among Morsi supporters who are offering the Tarawih prayer after the evening meal during Ramadan, in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi during a rally in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi protest at the Republican Guard building in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • A supporter of ousted President Mohamed Morsi joins in a protest at the Republican Guard building in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • A supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi reads the Koran at the Rabaa Adawiya square, Cairo,  July 9, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi at their camp in Rabaa Adawiy square, Cairo, July 9, 2013. 
  • A supporter of ousted President Mohamed Morsi with a national flag gestures to army soldiers guard at the Republican Guard building in Nasr City, Cairo, July 9, 2013.
  • Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of Morsi at Republican Guard headquarters in Nasr City, Cairo, July 8, 2013. 
  • Supporters Morsi carry the body of a fellow supporter killed by violence outside the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • Morsi supporters mourn protesters who died during clashes with army soldiers in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • Wounded supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi wait for treatment at a field hospital in Cairo, July 8, 2013. 

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Michael from: USA
July 10, 2013 8:11 AM
New events in statehood are nothing to be ashamed about. Egypt after all is the country of time. The problem would be the fast-track approach or executions where decisions fail to make for progress in government


by: ali baba from: new york
July 09, 2013 8:18 PM
the new Gov. should not intimated by violence of Muslim brotherhood. it is organization know the language of power. it they want continue violence, the military should get tough. arrest these incite the violence and put them in military court and those who get convicted with violence should be executed

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