News / Africa

Egypt Orders Arrest of Muslim Brotherhood Leaders

A combo shows Khairat el-Shater (R), then presidential candidate of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, on April 9, 2012 and Mohammed Badie (L) at a news conference in Cairo, January 16, 2010.
A combo shows Khairat el-Shater (R), then presidential candidate of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, on April 9, 2012 and Mohammed Badie (L) at a news conference in Cairo, January 16, 2010.
Edward Yeranian
Egypt's top prosecutor has ordered the arrests of top Muslim Brotherhood leaders, even as the country's interim prime minister starts to reach out to the group to form a transitional government.  Street protests appear to have dwindled dramatically in size Wednesday as most ordinary Egyptians began fasting for the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. 

In this image released by the Egyptian Presidency, Hazem el-Beblawi meets with interim President Adly Mansour, unseen, in Cairo, July 9, 2013.In this image released by the Egyptian Presidency, Hazem el-Beblawi meets with interim President Adly Mansour, unseen, in Cairo, July 9, 2013.
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In this image released by the Egyptian Presidency, Hazem el-Beblawi meets with interim President Adly Mansour, unseen, in Cairo, July 9, 2013.
In this image released by the Egyptian Presidency, Hazem el-Beblawi meets with interim President Adly Mansour, unseen, in Cairo, July 9, 2013.
Egypt's interim Prime Minister-designate Hazem el-Beblawi met with top political figures Wednesday amid hopes of putting together a new government, quickly. Islamists as well as the main National Salvation Front oppose parts of a draft plan to restore democracy, including steps to amend the constitution.

A spokesman for interim President Adly Mansour said that all parties, including the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party and the Salafi Nour Party, would be offered posts in the new government.

However, a top figure in the Freedom and Justice Party, Mohamed Kamal, declared that his group would not participate in the new government.

Another prominent Muslim Brotherhood figure, Essam el Erian, says his party wants no part in the government, and demands that ousted President Mohamed Morsi be reinstated.

Newly appointed General Prosecutor Hisham Barakat, however, has issued warrants for the arrest of the Brotherhood's Supreme Guide Mohamed Badie, as well as Essam el Erian and Mohamed Baltagi.  Authorities also have arrested 260 Brotherhood supporters for questioning over Monday's shootout near a Cairo military complex.

With the start of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, much of the crowd of Brotherhood supporters demonstrating in front of Cairo's Rouba Adawiya mosque appears to have left. Less than a thousand demonstrators remained in Cairo's Tahrir Square.

The Egyptian press reported that Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have pledged to donate a combined $8 billion in aid to help the ailing Egyptian economy get back on its feet. Riyadh will also give quantities of petroleum products to help ease a chronic fuel shortage.

  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi perform weekly Friday prayers at the Rabaa Adawiya square in Cairo where they are camping, July 12, 2013.
  • A supporter of Morsi is doused with water on a hot day in Cairo, July 12, 2013.
  • Supporters of the ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shout anti-army slogans during a sit-in protest in Cairo July 11, 2013.
  • Morsi Supporters pray after breaking their fast during Ramadan, in Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, July 11, 2013.
  • An Egyptian boy stands among Morsi supporters who are offering the Tarawih prayer after the evening meal during Ramadan, in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi during a rally in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi protest at the Republican Guard building in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • A supporter of ousted President Mohamed Morsi joins in a protest at the Republican Guard building in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • A supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi reads the Koran at the Rabaa Adawiya square, Cairo,  July 9, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi at their camp in Rabaa Adawiy square, Cairo, July 9, 2013. 
  • A supporter of ousted President Mohamed Morsi with a national flag gestures to army soldiers guard at the Republican Guard building in Nasr City, Cairo, July 9, 2013.
  • Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of Morsi at Republican Guard headquarters in Nasr City, Cairo, July 8, 2013. 
  • Supporters Morsi carry the body of a fellow supporter killed by violence outside the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • Morsi supporters mourn protesters who died during clashes with army soldiers in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • Wounded supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi wait for treatment at a field hospital in Cairo, July 8, 2013. 

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by: Maryam from: America
July 10, 2013 1:06 PM
The first democratically leader in a true free and fair election in 5,000 years of Egyptian history is toppled by a military coup and you have people cheering this situation. The Egyptian army responded to coup protesters by massacring civilians including innocent women and children. Mubarak era prosecutors have the victims of the massacre arrested and charge political leaders that were deposed in the coup under questionable circumstances. These are the facts.

The only way Egypt can get out of this mess is to eliminate the army out of Egyptian politics. The army is there to protect the people not for people to need protection from army units that attack civilians. State run industries need to be privatized in open and fair auctions and allow a free market economy to grow in Egypt like South Korea and Taiwan. Otherwise a year from now, you will see the same protests in the streets of Egypt again.

by: Ingy Sammakia from: Toronto Canada
July 10, 2013 12:59 PM
I hope they catch these leaders, because they are inciting hatred and violence against Christians, seculars, the police and army. Good riddance!

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 10, 2013 11:50 AM
The Muslim Brotherhood should stop whimpering that Morsi was elected. What if he was? He came to power by the mob action that pushed Hosni Mubarak away. A process was wrongly and abruptly terminated by Morsi coming on stage. They called it revolution – they wanted a change to Egypt of their dream – the Egyptian Dream.

After a year of the experiment the people realize that something like a fatal mistake was made, and for the sake of posterity they choose to correct it NOW, otherwise the ghost of that fatal error will haunt them forever. Someone – a Morsi supporter – described Mohamed Morsi’s rule as terribly flawed. We cannot say more. This was a terrible set up that did not represent the aspirations of the Egyptian people. Therefore no surprise they rose to correct it.
The army should not blow this chance to identify with the Egyptian aspiration or lower their guard for the crocodile tears of or threat by Morsi supporters, who, though they know the truth, allow their selfish and/or sectarian interest becloud their mentality for a greater Egypt..


In Response

by: Ingy Sammakia from: Toronto Canada
July 10, 2013 1:03 PM
My sentiment too. I voted on the ousting of Morsi through a petition called "REBEL". 22 Million voted for her ousting, yet CNN keeps supporting him and Christian Ammanpour was so worried about Morsi and kept asking "Where is he?" Let them take Morsi and his clan to the USA and let them run the country. In one year, there won't be any gasoline, solar, lights and our food will be rotten bread. Obama gave the MB's a huge amount of money, but they used it to feed their own and their fat belies.

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 10, 2013 11:48 AM
Just hoping that the hard line islamist groups truly stay out of the deal and allow the arrangement to work. Their presence would rather intimidate participants at the process while their absence will be the much desired blessing to allow Egyptian brain-stormers put their heads together to move Egypt forward. They should not be like Muslim Brotherhood that says one thing and means another. Stay out of power if you so choose, but please don't get in the way of the new administration's duty to put Egypt back to strong footing.

by: Dr. Malek Towghi from: Michigan, USA
July 10, 2013 11:12 AM
When will president Obama apply the US laws concerning the military coup in Egypt and its expanding tyranny? The existing American law/s requires/require that all US aid to the al-Sisi regime must be cancelled. I voted twice for Mr. Obama; I wish I had never done so.

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