News / Africa

Egyptians Skeptical about Muslim Brotherhood’s Policies

Muslim Brotherhood's Morsi Claims Win, Egypt's Military Claims PowersMuslim Brotherhood's Morsi Claims Win, Egypt's Military Claims Powers
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Muslim Brotherhood's Morsi Claims Win, Egypt's Military Claims Powers
Muslim Brotherhood's Morsi Claims Win, Egypt's Military Claims Powers
Peter Clottey
A scholar says many Egyptians are expressing concern about the impact of the Muslim Brotherhood’s policies on their “secular lives” after the Islamic group claimed victory in the presidential run-off vote.

Clottey interview with Said Sadek, professor of political sociology at the American University in Ca
Clottey interview with Said Sadek, professor of political sociology, American University in Cairo i
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Said Sadek, professor of political sociology at the American University in Cairo, said many Egyptians are not religious fanatics, and are worried about the social policies the Muslim Brotherhood will implement.

He said years of propaganda against the Muslim Brotherhood makes Egyptians suspicious about the Islamic group.

“They have also seen many examples of Islamic states that restrict personal liberties and undermine human rights. And so not everybody in Egypt is crazy about or loves the Muslim Brotherhood,” Sadek said.

The group’s candidate Mohammed Morsi declared victory in the country's first presidential election following last year’s up-rising against President Hosni Mubarak. The group said unofficial results show he won about 52 percent of the vote in the two day run-off election that ended Sunday. It said it based its claim of victory on results tallied by the party’s representatives at almost all of the country's the polling stations.

But establishment-backed rival Ahmed Shafiq disputes the claim. One of his aids, Mahmud Barakeh, expressed astonishment at the Brotherhood's announcement, accusing the Islamists of “hijacking” the election by refusing to wait for the official results scheduled for Thursday.

Sadek said there appears to be low enthusiasm for both Morsi and Shafiq.

“The two choices left in the eyes of Egyptians symbolize what people didn’t want in the Egyptian revolution… the people were scared, and they felt that they had very little choice. Women, Copts, businessmen, liberals, were not happy with choosing the Islamists and they voted for  Shafiq,” said Sadek.

“The whole electoral process reflected fear. It was not motivated by democracy or anything," he added. "People voted for Shafiq because they feared Morsi, and those who voted for Morsi did that because they feared Shafiq because [of his role] against the revolution. He may create the old system of [Hosni] Mubarak, with its corruption and violation of human rights.”

He said many Egyptians anxiously stayed up all night for the results of the second-round vote. Sadek said the country’s social networks reflected frustration, disappointment, shock, fear and many unhappy people.

“You don’t see people jumping in the street, because we have for the first time a freely elected president [who] does not promise respecting the universally declared human rights and personal liberties,” said Sadek.

He said the election of Morsi has dual implications for Egypt’s revolution, which ousted former President Mubarak.

“In one sense, it is a victory. We did not elect the same system, we got someone from outside the system. But at the same time Mr. Morsi is a product of a totalitarian ideology. He has been working for a party and an organization that has a special view about how things should be done and that may affect personal liberties and human rights,” he said. 

The Cairo-based CBC Satellite Television Channel says in remarks following his declaration of victory, Morsi pledged to be a servant to all Egyptians.

 “We people are equal,” he said. “No one will oppress the other. The powerful will not oppress the weak. The rights of the weak will not be neglected. We are all looking .forward to maintaining stability, love, and brotherhood, and seeing a… civil, national, democratic, constitutional, and modern state.”  
 
The website for the daily Al-Arabiya newspaper says Morsi has voiced support for women’s rights, freedom of expression – including peaceful protests - and for the rights of Egypt’s Coptic Christian minority.  The paper says he has called for a democratic state with a separation of powers. 
 
Egypt's ruling military leaders have vowed to honor their promise to hand over power to the newly elected president by the end of the month.

The ruling generals’ announcement Monday comes a day after they declared a new interim constitution, a move that diminishes the powers of the eventual election winner. The military council has led the country since Mubarak's ouster in March 2011.

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by: SergeyIvanov
June 19, 2012 10:10 AM
Yes, lets move in NATO forces and kick out military and Muslim brotherhood out and elect the most loyal and democratic president.
We have a number of cases of human rights violations in Egypt, it is enough for military intervention.

by: Claudio
June 19, 2012 10:08 AM
Another Iran on the making!

by: Mike from: Pennsylvania
June 19, 2012 9:54 AM
During the Arab Spring, the only people that wanted sharia were men, because it restricts the lives of women. So saying most Egyptians is wrong Guy Macher, it is actually most Egyptian MEN want sharia to control women which is BS frankly.

by: Dave M from: NJ
June 19, 2012 9:35 AM
@Nikos. Off course not and why would they. Mubarak regime corrupt but it was predictable. Now you have these guys that lied on multiple occasions and o one really trusts them. Only reason they won is the huge number of uneducated Egyptians.

by: Nikos Retsos from: Chicago, USA
June 19, 2012 8:59 AM
Has the VOA published a headline in the last 30 years titled: Egyptians skeptical about Mubarak's policies? Of course it didn't! This is mudslinging of the Egyptian Revolution, isn't it? Nikos Retsos, retired professor

by: Guy Macher from: Canada
June 19, 2012 7:44 AM
Polls taken since the glorious Arab Spring reveal most Egyptians want sharia. They elected an Islamist parliament and though it was declared "unconstitutional" (whatever that means in a lawless country) they went on to elect an Islamist for president. Now they are sure to get sharia. To complain about the prospect shows the paucity of logic which afflicts Muslims and their societies.

by: RJ from: USA
June 19, 2012 7:37 AM
Let's start by demanding the USG and the media answer the hard question first …. Was there ever a real Arab Spring that was a people movement? Or was the movement fabricated by outside influence? Why no Arab Spring in Iran? Why failure in Libya? Has something backfired in a backroom agreement somewhere in Egypt?

As an American, we know real people movements and I know that today the biggest movement in America stems from a man named Mohammad Goldstein. In The Plot to Overthrow this man bluntly tells the world who a Jew IS and what a Muslim really IS. Obama, all senators, and congressmen all have hard copies, and you can get it for nuttin on the net it will blow your political mind about Americas world role and is laced with "inside" truth about Washington.

There is real intelligent change taking place in America and it took this one man to bluntly tell the world about the inner working of Washington. This document about Washington is so revealing that he has gone into hiding. Arab Spring? Go get the document it will knock the silly out of your politics.

by: rex from: Pittsburgh
June 19, 2012 7:34 AM
Egyptians Skeptical about Muslim Brotherhood’s Policies?

Of course they are!
That’s because the Muslim Brotherhood is Al Qaeda.
And they know it.

by: Tom Mariner from: Bayport, USA
June 19, 2012 7:32 AM
“You don’t see people jumping in the street, because we have for the first time a freely elected president [who] does not promise respecting the universally declared human rights and personal liberties". Democracy, which was celebrated a year ago, appears to have failed. And both candidates are really fronts for groups who will not give up power once it is handed to them -- one the military, the other a religion. So once the people wake up to the disaster their votes have caused, they will have no chance to correct the mistake.

by: andrew mohan charles from: kerala, india
June 18, 2012 10:02 PM
Scholars from across nations are to be found in American Universities. The lucky ones get to publish papers of international standards. It is good that at least somewhere, scholars are still held in respect.
Unemployability for not toeing the institutional line of the Military Industrial Complex is but an occupational hazard?
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