News / Middle East

Tense Egypt Awaits Army Announcement

Laser lights are seen as anti-Morsi protesters gather in Cairo's Tahrir Square, July 3, 2013.
Laser lights are seen as anti-Morsi protesters gather in Cairo's Tahrir Square, July 3, 2013.
VOA News
Rival demonstrators filled the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities late Wednesday after expiration of an army ultimatum to Islamist President Mohamed Morsi, demanding that he act to resolve the country's political crisis.

Crowds of Morsi's opponents have been demanding his ouster. Egypt's powerful military moved armored vehicles into central Cairo to restrict travel by the president and senior members of his Muslim Brotherhood organization.

Security officials said troops with armored vehicles had secured Egyptian state television studios in the center of the capital.

One of Morsi's top advisers said the country was in the midst of "a military coup," and he called for peaceful resistance by civilians.

In a statement issued just before the army deadline elapsed, Morsi said his solution for the national unrest would be appointment of a government of national consensus and an independent committee to amend the constitution. But he repeated that he had no intention of stepping down and said his electoral legitimacy is the only safeguard against instability.

The army gave Morsi 48 hours to resolve the political impasse or risk military intervention. Military leaders said they would impose a "roadmap" for Egypt if differences between the Islamist government and its opponents were not resolved by 5 p.m., local time (1500 UTC) Wednesday, but that deadline passed without any visible action.

Soon afterward, a military helicopter circled over huge crowds of Morsi opponents cheering and waving Egyptian flags in Cairo's Tahrir Square. A few kilometers away, a pro-government rally was underway.

Beattie Q&A with Stephen Zunes, politics professor, chair of Middle East Studies at San Francisco U
Beattie Q&A with Stephen Zunes, politics professor, chair of Middle East Studies at San Francisco Ui
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Millions more Egyptians were in the main squares of cities nationwide for a fourth straight day. Many of them said they support Egypt's first democratically elected civilian leader, but larger numbers said they want Morsi to resign, with early elections to follow.

Egypt's interior ministry warned that police would respond firmly to any violence. The past week of clashing rallies has killed almost 40 people, including 18 during violence overnight near Cairo University.

Earlier Wednesday, army commander Abdel Fattah al-Sisi met with pro-reform leader Mohamed ElBaradei, the country's top Muslim and Coptic Christian leaders and some smaller, Islamist parties. Authorities said they were discussing the way forward for Egypt. The ruling Muslim Brotherhood's political arm the Freedom and Justice Party refused to meet with the army chief, saying it recognizes only the authority of President Morsi.

Watch:  Live video from Tahrir Square


In a separate development that increased political pressure on Morsi, Egypt's top judicial body confirmed the reinstatement of public prosecutor Abdel Meguid Mahmud, whom the president dismissed last year.

Egyptian police special forces stand guard beside an armored vehicle, protecting a bridge between Tahrir Square and Cairo University, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters have gathered, in Giza, Egypt, July 3, 2013.Egyptian police special forces stand guard beside an armored vehicle, protecting a bridge between Tahrir Square and Cairo University, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters have gathered, in Giza, Egypt, July 3, 2013.
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Egyptian police special forces stand guard beside an armored vehicle, protecting a bridge between Tahrir Square and Cairo University, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters have gathered, in Giza, Egypt, July 3, 2013.
Egyptian police special forces stand guard beside an armored vehicle, protecting a bridge between Tahrir Square and Cairo University, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters have gathered, in Giza, Egypt, July 3, 2013.
In a speech Tuesday night, President Morsi vowed to remain in office, even if it resulted in his death. He also demanded the military withdraw its threat to intervene in the political crisis.

Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood angrily rejected what it said was the army's attempt to seize power. The Brotherhood's spokesman, Gehad El-Haddad, told VOA the group would take direct action against any attempt to force Morsi to step down, but he added the president's supporters would not take up arms and go after the military:  

"If the tanks roll up to the president, we're going to stand in their way. And then the tanks have one of two choices: they roll over us and our dead bodies, or they stand still and respect the legitimacy of our president. There is no third option here," said El-Haddad.

A spokesman for Egypt's opposition Tamarud Movement said Morsi's time is up:

"The hour of victory has neared," the opposition figure said. "There are only a few hours left in the deadline set by the armed forces for this illegitimate president to leave the presidential palace. I believe it is our duty to go out and express our will so we can protect it."

Egypt's state-run news agency and other media reported portions of the military's plan had been circulated in advance. They said military officials were prepared to suspend the constitution, dissolve the legislature and set up an interim administration.

The army has said it is not interested in long-term political power. But that assurance was rejected by Haddad and other Muslim Brotherhood members, many of whom are suspicious of the military's backing of decades of harsh, authoritarian rule.

  • A supporter of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi chants slogans during a rally near Cairo University after Friday prayers in Cairo, Egypt, July 5, 2013. 
  • Opponents of Egypt's ousted president Mohammed Morsi wave national flags and posters showing Lt. Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi in Tahrir Square, Cairo, July 5, 2013. 
  • Palestinian Hamas security guard stands near an Egyptian watch tower on the border with Egypt in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, July 5, 2013. An Egyptian official said the country's border crossing with Gaza Strip in northern Sinai has been closed indefinitely.
  • Protesters, who support former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, perform Friday prayers near Cairo University in Cairo, July 5, 2013. 
  • A supporter of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi holds up a copy of the Koran as she and others march near Cairo University after Friday prayers in Cairo, July 5, 2013. 
  • A supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi cries during a protest near the University of Cairo, Giza, July 5, 2013.
  • Adly Mansour gestures at his swearing in ceremony as the nation's interim president in Cairo, July 4, 2013.
  • This image made from Egyptian State Television shows Egypt's interim president Adly Mansour, center, standing with judges during a swearing in ceremony at the constitutional court in Cairo, July 4, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted president Mohammed Morsi show victory signs during a rally, in Nasser City, Cairo, July 4, 2013.
  • An Egyptian Army commander talks to citizens while securing the area near Cairo University, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters gathered to support ousted president Mohammed Morsi in Cairo, July 4, 2013.
  • Egyptians celebrate after Egypt's chief justice Adly Mansour is sworn in as the nation's interim president, July 4, 2013. Arabic reads, " bye bye Morsi."
  • Egyptian military jets fly over Cairo as the head of Egypt's constitutional court Adly Mansour was sworn in as interim head of state, July 4, 2013.
  • Opponents of Egypt's ousted president Mohamed Morsi celebrate outside the presidential palace in Cairo, July 3, 2013.
  • Fireworks light the sky moments after Egypt's military chief said the president was being replaced by the chief justice of the constitutional court, Cairo, July 3, 2013.
  • Morsi supporters react after the Egyptian army's statement was read out on state TV, at the Raba El-Adwyia mosque square in Cairo, July 3, 2013.

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Comments
     
by: MJS917 from: New York
July 03, 2013 8:28 AM
Democracy Now! had a very interesting report from a reporter live in Tahrir Square about the protests and what could happen if Morsi stays defiant. Their reporter, Sharif Abdel Kouddous, has been doing great coverage of the revolution.


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 03, 2013 7:22 AM
The military in Egypt should better understand what they are doing. After that statement of commitment, they should understand that they have reached a point of no return; for it is either they make good their promise or the president will deal decisively with them. Which ever way, the country is in serious crossroads. Morsi's fanatical islamists have shown that they are ever ready for attack - they may have been belligerent all the while spoiling for a show of their might. So the army finds itself in deep waters. It must stop the demonstration of stupidity by the political elite headed by Morsi, it must stop the insurgency of the extremist groups like the military arm of the muslim brotherhood, it must find ways to remain intact to stand up for the defense of the country in times of need. This is real dilemma for the army.

In Response

by: Paul B. from: California
July 03, 2013 9:19 AM
What’s a life worth? What’s more than that life worth? Answer: The same thing. Already many have died; does it really matter how many?. In the American Civil War between 620,000 and 850,000 perished! The Egyptian military needs the resolve to just plow through any resistance that stands in the way of its tanks; just mow over them. How many lives will be lost? Six? Nine? Nineteen? Or maybe even just one or two initial fools, before everyone else scatters. Were there is a will there is way. The way is clear; all that’s needed now is the will. The the one(s) who perish? If you can’t stand the heat, then you shouldn’t be in the kitchen.

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