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11 Dead in Separate Iraqi Bombings

Iraqis inspect aftermath of a car bomb attack at Baghdad's mostly Shiite neighborhood of Husseiniyah, Iraq, June 25, 2013.
Iraqis inspect aftermath of a car bomb attack at Baghdad's mostly Shiite neighborhood of Husseiniyah, Iraq, June 25, 2013.
VOA News
Two suicide bombers have killed at least eight Iraqi Turkmen and wounded dozens more in an ethnically disputed northern city. Also Tuesday in Iraq, a separate bomb blast struck a minibus carrying Shi'ite pilgrims in the holy city of Karbala, resulting in three more deaths.
 
There were no immediate claims of responsibility.
 
The deadliest attack struck a tent packed with protesters in the ethnically-mixed town of Tuz Khormato, which lies in an area of northern Iraq contested by Arab Sunnis, Kurds and Shi'ite Turkmen. The latter were demanding tighter security for their community following a series of attacks, including on prominent members.
 
Among the dead Tuesday were a former deputy provincial governor and his two sons, as well as a former provincial official.
 
Ethnic Kurds want to incorporate the surrounding territory into their three-province autonomous region over Baghdad's objections.
 
Also Tuesday, a magnetic sticky bomb attached to a minibus exploded as Shi'ite pilgrims traveled to a shrine in Karbala.
 
Tens of thousands of Shi'ites are massing in Karbala, 80 kilometers south of Baghdad, for the annual festival of Shabaniyah marking the birth of the ninth-century Shi'ite leader known as the Hidden Imam.
 
The latest attacks come a day after 35 people were killed across Iraq, most of them in a series of car bombs in Baghdad, as the country grapples with a prolonged political deadlock and months of protests from its Sunni Arab minority.
 
Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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