News / Africa

Ethiopia Denies Planning Immediate Pullout From Somalia

Ethiopian soldiers patrol in the town of Baidoa in Somalia, Feb. 29, 2012.Ethiopian soldiers patrol in the town of Baidoa in Somalia, Feb. 29, 2012.
x
Ethiopian soldiers patrol in the town of Baidoa in Somalia, Feb. 29, 2012.
Ethiopian soldiers patrol in the town of Baidoa in Somalia, Feb. 29, 2012.
TEXT SIZE - +
Gabe Joselow
— Ethiopia’s foreign ministry has denied there are plans to immediately withdraw all troops from Somalia, despite remarks by the Ethiopian prime minister expressing frustration with the pace of military progress in the country. 
 
Speaking to parliament Tuesday, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn said the African Union force in Somalia has not kept its promise to replace Ethiopian soldiers in parts of the country under AU control. 
 
Ethiopian forces entered Somalia two years ago to assist the AU force, known as AMISOM, in its fight against al-Shabab militants.  The Ethiopians have enjoyed success securing towns and cities in western Somalia.
 
But Hailemariam said the failure of AMISOM to replace Ethiopian troops influenced a decision in March to pull out of the town of Hudur, which was then retaken by al-Shabab.
 
In a statement Wednesday, the foreign ministry clarified the prime minister’s remarks, saying Ethiopia was “anxious to pull its forces out of Somalia” as soon as the Somali army and AMISOM take over from Ethiopian forces.
 
Foreign Ministry spokesman Dina Mufti told VOA Ethiopian forces are not planning to immediately pull out of the country.
 
“[The prime minister] said, Ethiopian defense force has to be transferred to those areas where there is need for more stability.  He has never said we are going to withdraw," he said. 
 
The prime minister noted that Ethiopia bears the cost of its military operation in Somalia alone, as Ethiopian forces are operating independent of AMISOM.
 
He said Ethiopia’s main focus should be “to accelerate our complete withdrawal towards our border.”
 
AMISOM spokesman Eloi Yao told VOA the peacekeeping force has not received any formal statement from Ethiopia regarding conditions for withdrawing forces.
 
He said in the event of a sudden pullback, the military commanders on the ground would work with the Somali government to decide a way forward.
 
“As you know, in military operations, plans are made and those plans can always be adjusted according to situations," said Yao. 
 
Hailemariam’s remarks come ahead of a Somalia conference in London next month, aimed at coordinating development efforts for the country as it recovers from two decades of civil war.

You May Like

Multimedia Anti-Keystone XL Protests Continue

Demonstrators are worried about pipeline's effect on climate change, their traditional way of life, health and safety More

Thailand's Political Power Struggle Continues

Court gave Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra until May 2 to prepare her defense over abuse of power charges but uncertainty remains over election timing More

Malaysia Plane Search Tests Limits of Ocean Mapping Technology

Expert tells VOA existing equipment’s maximum operating depth is around 6 kilometers as operation continues on ocean bed for any trace of MH370 More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Alem
May 07, 2013 8:53 AM
Gabe: I could not believe it is taking Obama Administration this long to figure out games Ethiopian rulers have been playing in Somalia. Please go back six years and count the number of times and the timing of a pull-out followed by denials. I am hoping you are a serious reporter wanting to tell Americans the whole truth. Ethiopian rulers do NOT want to share "peace-keeping" in Somalia with any other country. This is big business and also allows them to remain in power indefinitely and not be scrutinized for wiping out all opposition in Ethiopia and also for stealing millions of aid money. In other words, pull-out announcements and denials jack up the going price. It is sad that American taxpayers dollars are prolonging tyranny that Obama preached will not be tolerated. The photo of Ethiopian soldiers above is revealing. You may want to study the "leader" on his cellphone [his attire and shoes, etc]. You may also want to look at Ethiopia in South Sudan [for America] at the same time remaining "bosom buddies" with Omar Bashir. That should tell you why Ethiopian rulers hunt down, jail, torture, and exile independent journalists. What you now have is Ethiopian rulers news outlets in their varied configurations run from Ministry of Information. That explains why two Swedish journalists who sneaked in from Somalia side were arrested and their videos confiscated before they could publish news Ethiopian rulers would not want the world to know. Would you believe if I told you the news of Islamic uprising in Ethiopia is partly staged? Would you believe if I informed you the Saudi Al Amoudi mining projects use dangerous chemicals and would not allow any foreign journalist to come close? Do you realize your not informing the public properly could cause deaths, imprisonment, and promote tyranny?


by: Truth Teller from: Here
April 24, 2013 11:45 PM
Whether Ethiopian troops stays in Somalia or leave - it's in NO OTHER countries best interest, but Ethiopia's national security. So, Western countries - especially the United States and EU - should NOT be a sucker for this old and silly trick and rush to fill up this corrupt and thuggish regimes Swiss Bank account - with their CITIZENS tax payers dollar. AGAIN, ANY MONEY RAISED OR INCREASED OR DONATED FOR THIS REGIME - FOR REASONS THAT "ETHIOPIAN TROOPS ARE PULLING OUT FROM SOMALIA?!?!" - WILL ONLY BENEFIT THE THUGGISH LEADERSHIP FAT POCKET!!

In Response

by: Nostra Daimus from: Houston
April 26, 2013 11:38 AM
You must be really a Dummy, or you pretend to be one. African countries can't play stupid anymore. This is America's responsibility to fight/fund it. The Primeminister should have pulled Ethiopian troops.

Just tell me how many countries are suffering because of America's insatiable hunger for drugs? All countries down south their budget is being depleted to stop drugs going to America.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Pet Kangaroo Helps Spread Environmental Messagei
X
Penelope Poulou
April 22, 2014 5:53 PM
Children’s author Julia Heckathorn travels the world to learn about different ecosystems and endangered animals. She pours her knowledge into children’s books, hoping the next generation will right the environmental wrongs of our times. As in many children's books, the main character in Heckathorn's stories is an animal. Unlike those other characters, though, this one is real - a kangaroo, that lives in the author’s backyard. VOA’s Penelope Poulou has more.
Video

Video Pet Kangaroo Helps Spread Environmental Message

Children’s author Julia Heckathorn travels the world to learn about different ecosystems and endangered animals. She pours her knowledge into children’s books, hoping the next generation will right the environmental wrongs of our times. As in many children's books, the main character in Heckathorn's stories is an animal. Unlike those other characters, though, this one is real - a kangaroo, that lives in the author’s backyard. VOA’s Penelope Poulou has more.
Video

Video Pro-Russian Separatists Plan 'Federalization Referendum' in Eastern Ukraine

Pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine say they plan to move forward next month with a referendum vote for greater autonomy, despite the Geneva agreement reached with Russia, the U.S. and Ukraine to end the political conflict. VOA's Brian Padden reports from the city of Donetsk in Eastern Ukraine.
Video

Video Pope Francis Hopes Dual Canonizations Will Reconcile Church

On April 27, two popes - John the XXIII and John Paul II - will be made saints in a ceremony at St. Peter’s Square. VOA religion correspondent Jerome Socolovsky says the dual canonization is part of the current pope’s program to reconcile liberals and conservatives in the Roman Catholic Church.
Video

Video In Capturing Nature's Majesty, Film Makes Case for Its Survival

French filmmaker Luc Jacquet won worldwide acclaim for his 2005 Academy Award-winning documentary "March of the Penguins". Now Jacquet is back with a new film that takes movie-goers deep into the heart of a tropical rainforest - not only to celebrate its grandeur, but to make the case for its survival. VOA's Rosanne Skirble reports.
Video

Video Boston Marathon Bittersweet for Many Runners

Monday's running of the Boston Marathon was bittersweet for many of the 36,000 participants as they finished the run that was interrupted by a double bombing last year. Many gathered along the route paid respect to the four people killed as a result of two bombings near the finish line. VOA's Carolyn Presutti returned to Boston this year to follow two runners, forever changed because of the crimes.
Video

Video International Students Learn Film Production in World's Movie Capital

Hollywood - which is part of Los Angeles - is the movie capital of the world, and many aspiring filmmakers go there in hopes of breaking into the movie business. Mike O'Sullivan reports that regional universities are also a magnet for students who hope to become producers or directors.
Video

Video Pacific Rim Trade Deal Proves Elusive

With the U.S.-led war in Iraq ended and American military involvement in Afghanistan winding down, President Barack Obama has sought to pivot the country's foreign policy focus towards Asia. One aspect of that pivot is the negotiation of a free-trade agreement among 12 Pacific Rim nations. But as Obama leaves this week on a trip to four Asian countries he has found it very difficult to complete the trade pact. VOA's Ken Bredemeier has more from Washington.
Video

Video Autistic Adults Face Housing, Job Challenges

Many parents of children with disabilities fear for the future of their adult child. It can be difficult to find services to help adults with disabilities - physical, mental or emotional - find work or live on their own. The mother of an autistic boy set up a foundation to advocate for the estimated 1.2 million American adults with autism, a developmental disorder that causes communication difficulties and often social difficulties. VOA's Faiza Elmasry reports.
AppleAndroid