News / Africa

Evidence Released of Alleged Kenyan Election Irregularities

Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta takes the oath of office as his wife Margaret holds a bible during the official swearing-in ceremony at Kasarani Stadium in Nairobi, April 9, 2013.
Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta takes the oath of office as his wife Margaret holds a bible during the official swearing-in ceremony at Kasarani Stadium in Nairobi, April 9, 2013.
Civil society group the Africa Center for Open Governance (Africog), has launched a website that presents the evidence it filed at the Kenyan Supreme Court last month, detailing alleged irregularities in the just-concluded national election.  The group recently lost a court challenge to the election of Kenya's new president, Uhuru Kenyatta.

Speaking in Nairobi Friday at the launch, Maina Kiai, director of InformAction, a co-sponsor of the website, told reporters the group has launched the website to provide Kenyans with information so that they can judge for themselves the conduct of their government institutions.

“Our institutions in this country have to be held accountable, that no matter where they are, no matter what its, whatever you make a decision, please know someone will hold you accountable and that’s what the process is about," said Kiai.

Uhuru Kenyatta was declared the winner of last month's election, receiving a little more than 50 percent of the vote, just enough to avoid a run-off election.

His nearest rival, former Prime Minister Raila Odinga, and Africog challenged the results at the Supreme Court, alleging the vote counting was flawed.

After two weeks of court proceedings, the six justices ruled unanimously to uphold Kenyatta’s victory.

Kiai says up until now, only the judges have seen Africog's evidence.   Now, he says, the public can see it, along with analysis and any other evidence that might come up.

“This is not just about the case, our case, it’s about Kenyans and what happened and to know the truth about the election," said Kiai. "It’s a critical thing for us to continue having confidence in the electoral process.   We have to trust it and we have to feel that at least its listening to us and it knows we are watching it.”

The announcement of the result has divided the country, with Kenyatta's supporters calling on his opponents to accept the result and move on.

Gladwell Otieno is one of the people who launched the challenge of the election process in the Supreme Court.  She says Kenyans must face their country's problems directly, rather than sweeping everything under the carpet.

“We had the problem in 2007 of the tallying and the transmission of the votes, and the same problem present itself again in 2013," said Otieno. "And if we don’t deal with these things we're going to be faced again and again with the same issues until people lose faith in the electoral process which is a very dangerous thing.”

On Tuesday next week, the Supreme Court is expected to make public the arguments behind its decision to uphold Kenyatta’s victory.

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Comments
     
by: salim jiva from: KENYA
April 13, 2013 6:02 AM
In Kenya IMPUNITY reigns. It has been proved many a time but the dragon of impunity suppresses it leaving the citizens with no voice. With the new Constitution things should be straightened but Impunity rears its ugly head as reflected by the Supreme court's ruling. The wananchi (citizens of the land ) should now slay the dragon by chopping off its head once and for all. Whoever it may be, even the Supreme Court if the citizens don't have faith in it.


by: Kings from: Nairobi
April 13, 2013 3:22 AM
Kenyans know what maina kiai stands for. Nothing new he is presenting but propaganda.


by: benson mwirigi from: kenya
April 12, 2013 2:11 PM
we know iebc did there work perfectly being an independent body.i think we should 4get about politics and continue with the development activities.in a race there should be a win this is quit obvious and understandable by every person.i think the evidences were supposed to be submitted to court not to kenyans.what kenyans need is to support the current government and move on.am not that loyal but i think intellectuals should think in both vertical and horizontal dimension.what masses need now is good leadership!

In Response

by: Siage from: nairobi
April 13, 2013 6:14 AM
benson and all the Kenyans who are bent on sweeping the rot under the carpets and insisting on " let's move on" slogan, I wish to shock you all back to the impending rality that "Truth and Figures" are very stubborn elements. They often refuse to be wished away, and they will be with us all the time during the rule of the illegitimate office.
Let us all the reminded that building on a faulty foundation has only one altimate outcome: the building will form cracks sooner than later, and unless and until the faults are fixed at the foundation level, the cracks will get bigger, and ultimately the building will fall.

Governance institutions like the IEBC for management of elections, and the courts for administration of justice, and the parliament for legislation and oversight, are Kenya' national foundation. When we witness cracks all over the building, which is the elections' disputed results, and the nation is split down the middle like it is now, then we can be sure that the faults at the foundation are major, and unless we admit it and begin to fix them, we can be for sure waiting to see the house that is Kenya, fall and scrabble into ruins. We can avoid this possible outcome if we adhere to the objective rule of law, and put aside tribal supremacy primitivity.

In Response

by: Mala from: Nairobi
April 13, 2013 5:59 AM
Bravo Africog! Kenyans who want to know the truth have a right to do so. Those whose candidate won(50 plus 1) need to respect this right instead of popularizing a " just accept and lets move on" attitude. Sweeping dust under the carpet eventually piles and is expressed later on and in a a not-so peace-ful manner should history repeats it self.. ... for those who do not want to hear Africog, What is your fear?
Lets be civilized and peaceful.

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