News / Africa

Exiled General Sejusa Unlikely to Return to Uganda

General David Sejusa (credit Sejusa)
General David Sejusa (credit Sejusa)
Peter Clottey
The Uganda army general who demanded an investigation into an assassination plot linked to President Yoweri Museveni’s alleged succession plan, says he is unlikely to return to the East African country anytime soon.

“There is no doubt that on the surface of it, everything points at something wrong with the way the president has been handling the issues of his son.  And therefore, the onus is on him to clarify these issues and not sweep them under the carpet,” said General David Sejusa.

“How can you blame someone who is performing his duties and demanding that you investigate specific allegations?  What is that logic? I don’t understand it that these are wild allegations so they should not be investigated.”

Until he went into exile, General Sejusa was coordinator for Uganda’s intelligence agencies at the president’s office.  Sejusa said it was his duty to call for the inquiry, since the succession plan could destabilize the country.

Sejusa petitioned the administration to investigate rumors of a plot to assassinate senior administration officials opposed to Mr. Museveni’s succession plan.

Sejusa says he did not return to Uganda after his life was threatened.

“The plan had been to arrest me at the tarmac, put me on a helicopter, fly me to a place called Nakasongola, the next day make a mock attack that I was going to be rescued by my rebels, then I’m killed in crossfire.  There was an elaborate plan to eliminate me in the process and cover up these serious issues which I had raised,” said Sejusa.

“As a matter of fact I can tell you that it is not only my life which is in danger, but [also] lives of many leaders because the political system has broken down, and the only way to reign in all these upcoming voices of dissent is through force and repression.”

The army rejected Sejusa’s claims and has accused him of breaching an official code of conduct.  Senior administration officials have accused Sejusa of harboring presidential ambitions and spreading rumors to create divisions within the army.

“For them to come and deny before any investigations are carried out and then try to cover up, by imputing wrong motives on me who was performing his duty, shows some culpability ... as far as I am concerned, that is merely diversionary,” said Sejusa. 

He denied leaking his petition to the press after a newspaper published the contents of the letter demanding the inquiry.

“This was an internal correspondence between chiefs of intelligence.  The fact that it was leaked has nothing to with me,” said Sejusa.

President Museveni’s alleged plan is to step down and hand over power to his son, Brigadier Muhoozi Kainerugaba.  Critics say the sudden rise of Muhoozi, the first son of the president, to the position of the Special Forces Group commander in the Uganda Peoples Defense Forces (UPDF) forms part of the Museveni succession plan.  The government denies the existence of a succession plan.

In a recent press statement Special Forces spokesman Edson Kwesiga denied the existence of a succession plan to install Muhoozi as the country’s next leader.

“Uganda is not a monarchy where leadership is passed on from father to son.  This so-called (Muhoozi) project is a people’s creation,” said Kwesiga.                            

The Special Forces group is in charge of protecting the president, as well as the country’s oil installations and other institutions.
Clottey interview with Uganda's General David Sejusa (a)
Clottey interview with Uganda's General David Sejusa (a)i
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Clottey interview with Uganda's General David Sejusa (b)
Clottey interview with Uganda's General David Sejusa (b)i
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Comments
     
by: Bwanika Deogratius from: Kampala Uganda
July 17, 2013 5:58 PM
I personally am in Uganda currently but the situation here needs prayers. The political system here is completely broken down where by the politicians on the opposition are reigning by the mercy of their supporters. The so called super powers USA, England among others who pretend to be preaching the gospel of Democracy are blinded by the so called M7's contribution rather involvement in bringing peace in the war torn Somalia. I mean any patriotic leader would do that but not in the name selfish interests like our president did. He is trying to purify his political image world wide cover up his rotten and stagnant political agendas back home. For one reason he is some how succeeding in that USA knows really what is on the ground but has nothing to do rather say because of their personal interests. The same applies to China. The most funny thing is these countries forget that however much they support our country, the Ugandan citizens are the sole reason as to why their economies are still outstanding. A very unstable country politically will have limited chances next to non of developing. A good example is Somalia. What country among the so called Super powers is ready or has invested in Somalia in the name of attracting investors? That is where Uganda is heading because these so called super powers are looking at an individual who makes 0.1% of the government forgetting the 99.9% who are the citizens which should be their interest if they have to relate with Uganda as a country.

In a nut shell the Ugandan police, the army and other security institutions in the name of serving the country belong to an individual because they serve his interests. That is the Professionalization of the security bodies he was talking about when he was asking for the last term in office way back in 2006.

For Gen Ssejjusa to come out the way he did was the only way to express his dissatisfaction with the government he was serving. many may call him a traitor but I will call him a PATRIOT because the rule of law has been breached by many leaders in the country including the President M7. This has been witnessed by the current parliament where the constitution is just feeling the gap to recorganise Uganda an independent country but useless. The law in Uganda is now selective where by we now have a man called ORDER FROM ABOVE who is above the law. This man is untouchable and can do any thing at any time. Just mentioning his name, no one will dare ask and many innocent Ugandans have fallen victims in all aspects and sectors even those within the government have tested his wrath. May be that's why Gen. Ssejjusa too came up after tasting his wrath and could not stand it. What ever SSejjusa is saying could be right because he has served the system for quite long.

We are Ugandans who must love our country and work hard to see it a better place for the next generations to come by standing up against whatever is offending it. We should face our fear for the right cause of our nation. Just as Americans are proud of their state and are ready to protect it by all means, so should be Ugandans however small and poor our country may be.

Corruption!!! Corruption!! in the Office Of the Prime minister among other sectors of the government has caused a lot dissatisfaction in sectors of public service among Ugandans. For how long are we going to dwell on foreign aid? GOD bless Uganda.

by: Issa katabi from: USA
July 03, 2013 12:03 AM
Punch through the dark side of a despot ruler
Thanks to Gen Sejusa we are learning more of the evil regime acts that were until now hidden from the public. Gen -please publish your memoirs and destroy M7 once for all. ICC should start investaging M7 as the general pins him down with more evidence. We hope they won't be another dawn raid on the press as govt panic measure to stop the 'hot' news. Watch the space.

by: Henry from: Washington DC
July 01, 2013 4:53 AM
Note, the interview with General Sejusa of Uganda is not complete or fully posted
In Response

by: gmch from: Kla
July 20, 2013 1:24 PM
Nsubuga, instead of blaming the west whose hands are tied on the matter, you need to stand up and fight for your rights first. Join the demonstrations in town, call on your friends and mobilize like the Egyptians did. Don't hide behind the safety of your keyboard and expect others to die for you. The last time Ugandans trusted a foreigner to fight for them you and I know clearly what happened next
In Response

by: Steven Nsubuga from: Uganda
July 03, 2013 3:18 AM
The shame about all this is the continued support Museveni gets from his protectors "the western countries" led by USA. Its embarrassing when Museveni conducts his sham elections, and who congratulates him first? The US state department and president Obama! Fact is, while Obama puts pressure on the Egyptian govt. to respect legitimate grievances of Egyptians, he looks the other way when Museveni is butchering black Africans. What this is essence means is total culpability by western countries in the torture, rape and abuse of Ugandans by this man and his family. For what? Just because he sends troops in Somalia? As if a new Ugandan president wont do that? Ugandans will always ally with the USA but the USA is letting many Ugandans down by conspiring with this man to rule Uganda in perpetuity. ITS SAD!!

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