News / Africa

Female Suicide Bomber Kills Self, Soldier in Nigeria Attack

Chidi Odinkalu, chairman of Nigeria's National Human Rights Commission, addresses a gathering of people at a speak-out session of a #BringBackOurGirls rally in Lagos, Nigeria, June 7, 2014. Chidi Odinkalu, chairman of Nigeria's National Human Rights Commission, addresses a gathering of people at a speak-out session of a #BringBackOurGirls rally in Lagos, Nigeria, June 7, 2014.
x
Chidi Odinkalu, chairman of Nigeria's National Human Rights Commission, addresses a gathering of people at a speak-out session of a #BringBackOurGirls rally in Lagos, Nigeria, June 7, 2014.
Chidi Odinkalu, chairman of Nigeria's National Human Rights Commission, addresses a gathering of people at a speak-out session of a #BringBackOurGirls rally in Lagos, Nigeria, June 7, 2014.
Reuters
— A female suicide bomber killed herself and a soldier outside an army barracks in Nigeria's northeastern city of Gombe on Sunday, the military said, as local leaders reported the death count from a string of earlier militant attacks had reached 110.
 
No one claimed responsibility for the blast or last week's assaults, but Islamist group Boko Haram has set off bombs and killed thousands in its 5-year-old bid to carve out an Islamist state in the region.
 
Soldiers stopped the woman as she tried to get into the barracks with explosives hidden under her robes, defense headquarters said in a statement.
 
The device went off, killing her and a soldier searching her, it added.

“I heard a loud sound and then black smoke covering the place. ... We saw soldiers moving bodies,” Gombe trader Bello Kasuwankatako told Reuters.
 
Witnesses had earlier said between three and five people died.
 
Boko Haram - which dominated world headlines by kidnapping more than 200 schoolgirls in April - has fought back against an army offensive, piling political pressure on President Goodluck Jonathan and the military to end the carnage.
 
Leaders from Gombe's neighboring state of Borno told journalists on Sunday they had now buried 110 bodies from attacks on nine villages early last week - giving the first detailed breakdown on the casualties.
 
“It was a great tragedy. There are still corpses lying in the bushes surrounding the communities. Many of our people that fled to the top of the hills during and after the attacks are still there and now stranded,” said Ali Ndume, a senator representing southern Borno.
 
Civilian targets
 
Boko Haram started off focusing on military and government targets alongside schools - seen as representing corrupt Western influence - churches, and Muslim leaders who do not follow its brand of Islam.
 
It has been increasingly turning its guns on civilians in recent months, particularly after locals started setting up vigilante groups to try and fight back.
 
It has become the biggest security threat to Africa's biggest economy and oil producer.

Traditional leader Lawan Abba Kaka said they had buried 42 corpses at the village of Attagara, 24 at Aganjara, 20 at Agapalawa and smaller numbers at other settlements - all of them in the Gwoza hills near the border with Cameroon.
 
“The insurgents came and said they wanted to discuss something with us. They said we need to discuss some issues bordering on our differences in the communities, but they opened fire on people who were gathered,” said Kaka.
 
On Wednesday, gunmen rounded up more villagers outside Borno's state capital, Maiduguri, saying they were going to deliver a sermon, then opened fire, killing at least 42, said a police source.
 
“It seems they are moving to rural areas,” Hannah Donges, a researcher at the Small Arms Survey, told Reuters. “They are easier targets. ... It doesn't need sophisticated tactics. It makes them (Boko Haram) less predictable.”
 
Suspected Boko Haram militants attacked a town in Cameroon's far north on Saturday, but local security forces fought them off, killing at least two gunmen, Cameroon's government said. The militant group is also thought to be active in neighboring Niger and Chad.
 
The kidnapping of the girls from a secondary school in Borno's town of Chibok triggered a national and international campaign under the Twitter hashtag #BringBackOurGirls, calling on the government to step its efforts to free them.

You May Like

Reports of Mass Murder on Mediterranean Smuggler’s Boat

Boat sailed from Libya with 750 migrants aboard and arrived in Italy with 569 More

Video New Thailand Hotline Targets Misbehaving Monks

Officials say move aims to restore country’s image of Buddhism, tarnished by recent high profile scandals such as opulent lifestyle, drug and alcohol abuse, as well as child sex abuse More

Study: Dust from Sahara Helped Form Bahama Islands

What does the Sahara have in common with a Caribbean island? Quite a lot, researchers say More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: m abdul naser from: Bangladesh
June 08, 2014 4:57 PM
I am very much shocked by knowing mass killing of Nigerian people by the so called Book Haram.Nigerian govt.has shown the world about their incapability to deal with that terrorist organisation rather the govt.has giving them open licence to kill their innocent & pious citizens in as much as the Nigerian govt.are providing them open and uninterrupted vast space to collect their money,lethal weapons,armaments. The Nigerian Army is happy by lending & selling their Heavy Armour,Tanks and cavalry as the world has viewed those artillery used frequently by the terrorists for killing Nigerian peoples.Not a single bullet has so far been fired by the Nigerian army in any encounter or in any kind of retaliation against Book Haram,what it means?...US govt should take appropriate measure to engage in this urgent matter for abolition & total destruction of that bandits and killers of. Nigeria.May Allah bless the American & African people to eradicate the terrorism from Nigerian soil.

In Response

by: Mike from: Uk
June 09, 2014 1:52 AM
Us, uk , France and Saudi are the sponsors of terror. So asking them to help will yield nothing

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Astronauts Train in Underwater Labi
X
George Putic
July 25, 2014 7:25 PM
In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Not Even Monks Spared From Thailand’s Junta-Backed Morality Push

With Thailand’s military government firmly in control after May’s bloodless coup, authorities are carrying out plans they say are aimed at restoring discipline, morality and patriotism to all Thais. The measures include a crackdown on illegal gambling, education reforms to promote students’ moral development, and a new 24-hour phone hotline for citizens to report misbehaving monks. Steve Sandford reports from Bangkok.
Video

Video Virtual Program Teaches Farming Skills

In a fast-changing world beset by unpredictable climate conditions, farmers cannot afford to ignore new technology. Researchers in Australia are developing an online virtual world program to share information about climate change and more sustainable farming techniques for sugar cane growers. As VOA's Zlatica Hoke reports, the idea is to create a wider support network for farmers.
Video

Video Airline Expert: Missile will Show Signature on Debris

The debris field from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 is spread over a 21-kilometer radius in eastern Ukraine. It is expected to take investigators months to sort through the airplane pieces to learn about the missile that brought down the jetliner and who fired it. VOAs Carolyn Presutti explains how this work will be done.
Video

Video Treatment for Childhood Epilepsy Heats up Medical Marijuana Debate

In the United States, marijuana is classed as an illegal drug by the federal government. But nearly half the states have legalized it, to some degree. Proponents say some strains of marijuana might have exceptional health benefits, for treating pain or inflammation in chronic conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Shelley Schlender reports on a strain of medical marijuana developed in Colorado that is reputed to reduce seizures in childhood epilepsy
Video

Video Airbus Adds Metal 3D Printed Parts to New Jets

By the end of this year, European aircraft manufacturing consortium Airbus plans to deliver the first of its new, extra-wide-body passenger jets, the A350-XWB. Among other technological innovations, the new plane will also incorporate metal parts made in a 3-D printer. VOA's George Putic has more.
Video

Video AIDS Conference Welcomes Exciting Developments in HIV Treatment, Prevention

Significant strides have been made in recent years toward the treatment and prevention of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. This year, at the International AIDS Conference, the AIDS community welcomed progress on a new pill that may prevent transmission of the deadly virus. VOA’s Anita Powell reports from Melbourne, Australia.
Video

Video IAEA: Iran Turns its Enriched Uranium Into Less Harmful Form

Iran has converted its stockpiles of enriched uranium into a less dangerous form that is more difficult to use for nuclear weapons, according to the United Nations’ Atomic Energy Agency. The move complies with an interim deal reached with Western powers on Iran's nuclear program last year, in exchange for easing of sanctions. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.

AppleAndroid