News / Asia

Families Wait for Word on Vanished Malaysia Flight

Families Wait for Word on Vanished Malaysia Flighti
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William Ide
March 08, 2014 5:43 PM
Vietnamese rescue planes searching for a missing Malaysia Airlines jet spotted two large oil slicks in the area where the aircraft vanished. VOA's Bill Ide has the latest from Beijing, where passengers' relatives gathered. ((NARRATOR))

Families Wait for Word on Vanished Malaysia Flight

William IdeRebecca Valli
A Malaysia Airlines plane with more than 200 people on board lost contact with air traffic controllers shortly after it took off from Kuala Lumpur late Friday.  Although a search and rescue mission is underway little is still known about the fate of the flight, which presumably crashed. Family members say they are getting little information about what happened and getting increasingly frustrated.

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 was flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people, including 227 passengers and 12 crew members. Most of the passengers were Chinese nationals.

Two infants were also on board. The airline says that in addition to the 152 Chinese nationals board there were also 38 Malaysians, 12 Indonesians, seven Australians, three French and four Americans, one of whom was an infant.

The flight was originally supposed to arrive in Beijing at 6:30 in the morning local time Saturday.  Authorities brought many of the family members and loved ones of those on board to a hotel in Beijing where they waited anxiously for news. The situation at the hotel was chaotic with scores of reporters waiting for updates from the airline and family members growing increasingly frustrated.

One man, whose father-in-law was on board says the airline has told them nothing and when a reporter asks how he feels about the support the airline is giving them, he says: what do you think? The man says that in a room at the hotel where they are waiting, there are elderly parents and women crying.

  • A relative of Norliakmar Hamid and Razahan Zamani, passengers on a missing Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200 plane, cries at their house in Kuala Lumpur.
  • A man takes pictures of a flight information board displaying the Scheduled Time of Arrival (STA) of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 (top, in red) at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China, Mar. 8, 2014.
  • A relative of a passenger onboard Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 cries, surrounded by journalists, at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China.
  • This screengrab from flightradar24.com shows the last reported position of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370.
  • In this photo released by the Armed Forces of the Philippines, Western Command PIO, Filipino government troopers look at a map as they continue the search for the missing plane of Malaysian Airlines at Antonio Bautista Air Base in Puerto Princesa City, Palawan province.
  • Family members of those onboard the missing Malaysia Airlines flight walk into the waiting area at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang.
  • Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, center, arrives at the reception center and holding area for family and friend of passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, outside Kuala Lumpur.
  • A family member of passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane is mobbed by journalists at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, outside Kuala Lumpur.
  • A relative of a passenger onboard Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 cries as she talks on her mobile phone at the Beijing Capital International Airport, China.
  • A spokesperson, right, from the Malaysia Airlines speaks to the media during a news conference at a hotel in Beijing, China. Search teams across Southeast Asia scrambled to find a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 with 239 people on board that disappeared from air traffic control screens over waters between Malaysia and Vietnam early morning.

The long time partner of one of the American passengers on board tells VOA that she is getting regular updates from the airline and has not given up hope yet.

"As far as they [the airline] are concerned the flight went missing. It took off at 12:30 and it went missing two hours into the flight," she said.

On board the plane, there were also passengers from New Zealand, Ukraine, Canada, Russia, Italy, Taiwan, The Netherlands and Austria.

A spokesman for Malaysia Airlines says there is much speculation as to the fate of the plane, but nothing so far has been confirmed.

"We are working with authorities who have actively activated the search and rescue team to locate the aircraft. Our team is currently calling the next of kin of passengers and crew," he said.

Vietnamese authorities say the last detected signal from the missing flight was from an area about 240 kilometers off the southwestern coast of Vietnam near Tho Chu island.

The head of Malaysia Airlines, Ahmed Jauhari Yahya, said the flight's Malaysian pilot, Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, joined the airline in 1981 and has flown more than 18,000 hours.

The first officer, Fariq Hamid, joined the airline in 2007 and has more than 2,000 flying hours.

Among its fleet of 100 planes, Malaysia Airlines operates 15 Boeing 777-200 jets.

The aircraft has a strong safety record. Since it was commercialized in 1995, there has been only one fatal crash - in July 2013, when an Asiana Airlines 777 crash-landed in San Francisco killing three passengers, all Chinese teenage girls.

Shannon Van Sant also contributed to this report.

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Comments
     
by: Theodore from: USA
March 08, 2014 9:27 PM
There is no doubt that the sons of Ishmael are a great and blessed people by God, the Father of Abraham. So are the sons of Isaac. Long before Mohammed ever lived, the law was given unto the world through Moses, a son of Isaac. Thus, the law of God was given through Moses, not Mohammed. The promise of salvation is given by neither, it is given by God through His son, Jesus, the Christ. One only truly knows God through Christ. No one has God's salvation except through Christ. No one can truly stand before God, except through Christ. Those who truly repent before Christ are granted grace, forgiveness. Truth is Truth


by: angelo from: hong kong
March 08, 2014 9:06 PM
It s a waiting moments for news from specialites .we can t say anythings.... let s just pray for all of the flight... that s all.... thank you


by: Hindutva from: India
March 08, 2014 3:41 PM
this is Islamic terrorism if ever i saw one... let the world see that you do not have to be American or Israeli or Indian to suffer from this debased suicidal satanic cult of death and putrefaction.

In Response

by: Budhisttvu from: Indonesia
March 08, 2014 9:32 PM
LOL.. your hate speach no different then the terrorist.

In Response

by: Ahmed from: India
March 08, 2014 8:18 PM
This guy has very nice thinking Allah save all people on board and others from people like this who always think Great please keep your thinking with we don't need your advices


by: Henry Mkalira from: Malawi
March 08, 2014 9:09 AM
This was prophecised by TB Joshua, Nigeria through Emmanuel tv

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