News / Asia

Father of Wounded Pakistani Girl Grateful for Global Support

Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai reads a card as she recuperates at the The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham in this undated handout given to Reuters on November 8, 2012.
Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai reads a card as she recuperates at the The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham in this undated handout given to Reuters on November 8, 2012.
VOA News
The father of the teenage Pakistani girl shot by the Taliban has paid tribute to those around the world who have shown her support.

Ziauddin Yousafzai spoke Friday from Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England, where his daughter, Malala, is being treated for serious wounds suffered in the shooting.

A handout picture received from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital/University Hospitals in Birmingham shows Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, and her family.A handout picture received from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital/University Hospitals in Birmingham shows Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, and her family.
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A handout picture received from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital/University Hospitals in Birmingham shows Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, and her family.
A handout picture received from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital/University Hospitals in Birmingham shows Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, and her family.
He said Malala is recovering well and wants everyone to know she has been inspired and humbled by the thousands of cards, messages and gifts she has received.  He said such concern has helped her survive and stay strong.

Taliban gunmen shot 15-year-old Malala Yousafzai in the head and neck a month ago in Pakistan's northwestern Swat Valley.  She was internationally recognized for documenting Taliban atrocities in the area near her home and for promoting women's education. More than 60,000 people have signed a petition calling for her to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Separately, U.N. special envoy Gordon Brown presented Pakistan's government with a petition with more than one million signatures in support of Malala. The petition delivered by the former British prime minister also supported the universal right to education.

Earlier this week, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon declared Saturday as a day to pay tribute to Malala and to recognize that 61 million children are still not in school.

Pakistan's Human Rights Commission praised the move, saying Malala has been accepted as a symbol of girls' aspirations to receive an education.

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Comments
     
by: Vinod Malhotra from: New Delhi
November 11, 2012 11:27 PM
Please get well soon
What is truly beautiful girl like you doing in the hosiptal
Mat GOD (One only in this world) bless you and your family
Love you sweet heart
Vinod, Supriya, Vikram and Priyanka


by: Richard Brandlon from: California USA
November 09, 2012 1:53 PM
Malala is a symbol of more than women's right to an education. She is an individual - not a member of a non-reasoning mob. In a brochure put out by the Islamic Circle of North America, S.H. Pasha writes: "One who truly practices Islam cannot be a terrorist." The people who shot Malala were terrorists.


by: female activist from: USA
November 09, 2012 1:51 PM
Please sign & share petition for Malala:

https://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/uk-party-leaders-and-foreign-secretary-nominate-malala-for-the-nobel-peace-prize-nobel4malala-2#share


by: Lynette Schmidt from: Weed, California, USA
November 09, 2012 1:50 PM
A breath of spirit unfolded as I saw this photo. Beyond any award and yes she should have a Universal Award for Courage. She should be safe to pursue her education. We thank you for your courage woman we send you red silk flags of courage so that your courage and strength will build. Most of all we send you Love deep and abiding Love. Lynette Schmidt, USA

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