News / USA

Protesters March Again Following Missouri Teen Shooting

  • Police advance to clear the crowds during a protest for Michael Brown, Ferguson, Missouri, Aug. 18, 2014.
  • Police officers detain a demonstrator during the protest of Michael Brown's shooting death in Ferguson, Missouri, Aug. 18, 2014.
  • Demonstrators protest the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, Aug. 18, 2014.
  • A man tries to recover after being treated for tear gas exposure, Ferguson, Aug. 18, 2014.
  • A man is lead away after being detained by police, Ferguson, Missouri, Aug. 18, 2014.
  • Demonstrators march through the streets in protest of the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, Atlanta, Georgia, Aug. 18, 2014.
  • Brown family attorney Daryl Parks points to an autopsy diagram of the head wound that was likely the fatal shot that killed Michael Brown, during a news conference, Ferguson, Missouri Aug. 18, 2014.
  • A man participates in a protest for Michael Brown, who was shot and killed by a police officer, Ferguson, Missouri, Aug. 18, 2014.
Ferguson, Missouri – Tuesday, August 19
VOA News

Protesters gathered again on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri late Tuesday to voice anger about the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager by a white police officer. 

The marches appeared to be peaceful, following a night of violent protests during which police arrested 78 people, including several journalists. 

Ferguson, a community populated mainly by blacks, has been hit by street protests punctuated by looting and clashes with police every night since 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed on August 9. 

Earlier Tuesday, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder promised the people of Ferguson a "full, fair and independent" investigation into the shooting of Brown. Holder will be in the St. Louis suburb Wednesday to meet with community leaders, FBI investigators and federal civil rights officials.

A grand jury is expected to begin hearing evidence in the case on Wednesday. 

In a videotaped message Tuesday, Missouri Governor Jay Nixon said a "vigorous prosecution" must now be pursued.  He called for justice for Brown's family.

In a message published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch newspaper, Holder said the full resources of the Justice Department are committed to the investigation.

He said, however, the town must see an end to violence and that the riots and looting in reaction to the shooting undermine justice.

The mayor of a U.S. town where police and protesters have clashed for 10 days following the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teen by a white policeman says there "is not a racial divide in the city of Ferguson."

Mayor James Knowles told U.S. TV channel MSNBC on Tuesday that the town of 22,000 people in the state of Missouri has been a "model for the region" as it changed from a majority white population to predominantly black.

The comments come after a third tumultuous night on the streets of Ferguson, which has seen ongoing protests since a police officer killed 18-year-old Michael Brown on August 9.

Seventy-eight civilians - including protesters and members of the press - were arrested Monday night and Tuesday morning in Ferguson after a day of peaceful protests. Initial reports indicated 31 arrests had been made.

St. Louis shooting

Meanwhile, police in St. Louis, Missouri have shot dead a man armed with a knife near the site of violent protests against the police shooting death of an unarmed black teenager August 9.

Police say the suspect in Tuesday's shooting allegedly stole merchandise from a food store.

He apparently challenged officers to shoot him and approached them with a knife. Police fired when he refused to drop it.

In Ferguson, Maria Chappelle-Nadal, who represents the town in the Missouri legislature, told CNN on Tuesday that peaceful protests would continue until charges were filed against the shooter.

"The demonstrations are going to continue until there's an arrest, until this officer is on leave without pay," said the state senator.

Nearly all of those arrested in the last day are charged with failing to disperse when police requested a crowd of roughly 200 people leave.

Outside agitators blamed

Most are not Ferguson residents, but many are from the area. Officials  repeatedly have blamed protesters from out of state for violent acts during nighttime demonstrations.

Brown's death has sparked allegations of systemic discrimination against minorities and a nationwide debate on race in the U.S.

A poll conducted over the weekend and released Monday by the Washington-based Pew Research Center shows 80 percent of African-Americans believe Brown's death raises important issues about race, compared to 37 percent of whites.

The survey also found that while 65 percent of black respondents believe the police went too far in responding to the shooting, that number plummets to 33 percent among the white population.

Police fired stun grenades and tear gas at crowds, as demonstrators lobbed firebombs and bottles at heavily armored police.

Officers say they came under heavy attack, but did not shoot their weapons. Two people were reported wounded by shots from within the crowd. Many people appeared to be defying orders from police to disperse.

National Guard troops that arrived earlier Monday to strengthen police forces could be seen on the fringes of the gathering.  

President weighs in

Monday, U.S. President Barack Obama said the actions of a "small minority" of demonstrators engaging in violence on the town's streets was heightening tensions.

He also said there was no justification for the use of excessive force by police, or any action that denies the rights of peaceful protesters.

An independent autopsy requested by Brown's family showed he was shot at least six times, including two bullets to his head.  

Attorneys for Brown's family said the autopsy shows the unarmed black teen was "trying to surrender" when Officer Darren Wilson fatally shot him. Two other autopsies have been commissioned.

Wilson is on paid administrative leave during the investigation.
 

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: dee doolley from: planet mars
August 20, 2014 12:07 AM
Question I raise is regarding the latest police shooting ..... did the officers not have taisers at their disposal? Feel certain that would have been better option ....appreciate being threatened with knife is frightening but feel situation could still have been brought to a better ending ....police in UK have to deal with these threats on daily. Basis without death being the end result.


by: brad from: ca
August 19, 2014 10:40 PM
wow,
This is a problem, so do you think they want the old neigbors back?.
this shows the disconnect of dealing with a racial problem.
Obama can you reach these people?
maybe the police need to be black so they can shot each other, then maybe it will be ok to inforce the laws of america


by: KKF from: BSH
August 19, 2014 9:40 PM
SHAME ON THE MEDIA, AND VOA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


by: Davemon from: FL
August 19, 2014 9:09 PM
Yes its bad that the unarmed black teenager was shot dead by the white cop. But what the heck do these idiots think is going to happen when they all gather in the street, loot stores and throw stuff at the cops? It doesn't take a genius to realize that the cops are going to beat on them and try to disperse them with tear gas or whatever it takes. Sure there are some peaceful protesters I'm sure, but if any of them had half a brain they'd realize they should go home or they will get treated the same way the looters and other thugs are being treated by the cops.


by: Anonymous
August 19, 2014 8:33 PM
Please read The Color of Crime by Jared Taylor. It provides ample evidence that there is no bias against minorities within the police and justice system. Blacks, specifically, simply commit much more violent crime than whites.


by: Chris from: Ferguson
August 19, 2014 8:27 PM
The is one of the most racist countries on the planet. Black and white Americans live in to very different worlds.


by: Steven M Einhorn from: Marlboro, NJ
August 19, 2014 8:22 PM
MEANWHILE BACK IN FERGUSON, MO......
BULLETIN:
CBS News is now able to report that Mr Brown was killed by an Israeli soldier of the Golani Brigade who was shooting at an innocent Hamas terrorist.
The bullet ricocheted off of the innocent terrorist's AK-47, passed through his wife who's been identified as a goat, hit the Eifell Tower, went zinging over the Atlantic where it picked up speed crossing the George Washington Bridge where it finally came to rest in Mr Brown's head.
The UNHRC says that they will convene a War Crimes Tribunal as soon as they get back from shopping at Cartier & Tiffany.
When reached for comment, President Obama said, "I don't know, maybe I'll use a Nine Iron here and maybe I can putt for par"


by: KR from: KJNB
August 19, 2014 5:22 PM
NO RACIAL DIVIDE, AND THE SUN DOES NOT RISE IN THE EAST AND SET IN THE WEST.

In Response

by: Db from: New York
August 19, 2014 10:39 PM
What the crap

In Response

by: Sue1987 from: Bronx, NY
August 19, 2014 8:24 PM
It's so obvious that this mayor is in total denial. How can he say there is no racial divide in the community?? Come on already!!! The police in military action is doing more harm than good and everyone can see that. Why not just arrest this officer who was involved and just throw the book at him. That would make EVERYONE both in the town and nationwide feel better.

In Response

by: Ned from: Nova Scotia
August 19, 2014 8:18 PM
Are you kidding me? No racial divide! Starting to to look more and more of "haves" and "have nots"!

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