News / Americas

    Uruguay Divided on Bite as Suarez Faces FIFA Ban

    Uruguay's Luis Suarez reacts after clashing with Italy's Giorgio Chiellini during their 2014 World Cup Group D soccer match at the Dunas arena in Natal, June 24, 2014.
    Uruguay's Luis Suarez reacts after clashing with Italy's Giorgio Chiellini during their 2014 World Cup Group D soccer match at the Dunas arena in Natal, June 24, 2014.
    Reuters

    Troubled Uruguayan striker Luis Suarez looks almost certain to miss the rest of the World Cup after FIFA opened disciplinary proceedings against him following an evening of accusations he bit an Italian defender.

    Italy's Giorgio Chiellini shows his shoulder, claiming he was bitten by Uruguay's Luis Suarez, during their 2014 World Cup Group D soccer match at the Dunas arena in Natal, June 24, 2014.Italy's Giorgio Chiellini shows his shoulder, claiming he was bitten by Uruguay's Luis Suarez, during their 2014 World Cup Group D soccer match at the Dunas arena in Natal, June 24, 2014.
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    Italy's Giorgio Chiellini shows his shoulder, claiming he was bitten by Uruguay's Luis Suarez, during their 2014 World Cup Group D soccer match at the Dunas arena in Natal, June 24, 2014.
    Italy's Giorgio Chiellini shows his shoulder, claiming he was bitten by Uruguay's Luis Suarez, during their 2014 World Cup Group D soccer match at the Dunas arena in Natal, June 24, 2014.

    A furious Giorgio said he had been bitten by Suarez during the South Americans' 1-0 Group D victory at the World Cup on Tuesday, and Reuters photographs showed what appeared to be bite marks on his shoulder.

    Pictures also showed Suarez sitting on the ground holding his teeth immediately after the incident.

    The probe means Suarez, twice previously banned for biting, looks set to be hit with another lengthy suspension despite escaping punishment during the match.

    Luis Suarez Incidents

    2013: Ten game ban for biting Chelsea defender Branislav Ivanovic
    2011: Eight game ban for racially abusive language toward Patrice Evra of Manchester United
    2010: Seven game ban for biting PSV Eindhoven's Otman Bakkal

    "FIFA can confirm that disciplinary proceedings have been opened against the player Luis Suarez of Uruguay," the world soccer body said in a statement late on Tuesday.

    FIFA said Suarez and the Uruguayan soccer association had until 5 p.m. Brasilia time (2000 GMT) on Wednesday to "provide their position and any documentary evidence they deem relevant".

    FIFA is probing what it called an apparent breach of two articles of the organization's disciplinary code. One covers infringements and the other offensive behavior and fair play.

    Suarez and Chiellini clashed in the Italian penalty area 10 minutes from the end of the match which sealed Uruguay's progression and Italy's elimination from the tournament.

    Chiellini furiously pulled open his shirt to show the mark to the referee, while a Uruguayan player attempted to calm the situation and pull the shirt back in place over the mark.

    The Italians were still complaining about it when Uruguay's Diego Godin scored with an 81st-minute header to secure the win.

    "It was ridiculous not to send Suarez off," Chiellini told Rai TV. "It is clear, clear-cut and then there was the obvious dive afterwards because he knew very well that he did something that he shouldn't have done."

    Suarez contested the Italian's version of events, however.

    "Those are situations that happen on the pitch. We were both just there inside the area. He shoved me with his shoulder, and my eye got left like that also," he said in reference to Chiellini's mark.

    Uruguay coach Oscar Tabarez said he did not see the incident, and complained that the forward was being persecuted.

    "It seems there is this animosity toward him and he is being persecuted by past events," a visibly agitated Tabarez said when repeatedly being asked about the alleged bite. "There are people hiding behind the tree waiting for something to happen."

    10-game ban

    Liverpool's Suarez was banned for 10 games last year after biting Chelsea's Branislav Ivanovic in a Premier League match and in 2010 he was suspended for seven games for a similar offence against PSV Eindhoven's Otman Bakkal while playing for Ajax Amsterdam.

    He missed Uruguay's World Cup semi-final against the Netherlands four years ago after being sent off for a handball on the line that denied Ghana what would have been a match-winning goal in the final minute of extra time.

    FIFA's rules allow the use of video or "any other evidence" to retrospectively punish players.

    FIFA's disciplinary code sets a maximum ban of 24 matches or two years, but the longest suspension FIFA has imposed for an offense at a World Cup was eight games for Italy's Mauro Tassotti for breaking Spain's Luis Enrique's nose in 1994 with an elbow.

    Uruguay could potentially play four more games in the tournament, and it would be a surprise if Suarez were to be given a ban of a shorter duration.

    Support at home

    Opinion in Uruguay, a country of around three million people sandwiched between soccer powerhouses Argentina and Brazil, was divided over Suarez's latest antics.

    The 27-year-old is regarded as something of a hero at home, having grown up in a poor family in the northwestern city of Salto, where he looked after parked cars to help support his siblings after his parents split up.

    "We needed to win, so if you have to hit you hit, if you have to bite you bite," said Barbara Giordano, a 26-year-old law student in Montevideo.

    Local media also complained about reaction to the incident round the world.

    Leading newspaper El Pais honed in on what it called a "very tough" attitude from English media towards Suarez and highlighted that the player's apparent bruised eye did not receive much attention.

    Some Uruguayans, however, were furious.

    "This kid can't control his biting and attacking issues," said Luis Lara, a 52-year-old shopkeeper. "That makes all of us Uruguayans look bad."

    On Wednesday morning, British newspapers offered a range of headlines reading "Chewy Luis," "Chew Dirty Rat," "Animal Suarez," "3 Bites and You're Out," "Kop Crisis as Suarez Faces Two-Year Ban for Sinking Teeth into Defender," "Kick Suarez Out of Finals, Says Chiellini," "Ban This Monster," and "Jaws III."

    Suarez's indiscretion also sent the world's social media into meltdown and within minutes of the match ending #Suarez was one of the top-trending hash tags on Twitter.

    A tweet from former Liverpool striker Michael Owen was typical of a wave of reaction from former players and pundits: "Tell me I'm seeing things. Surely Suarez didn't bite someone again?" he wrote. "I'm genuinely gutted. I love watching him play more than any other player but he obviously can't control himself."

    Suarez, England's Footballer of the Year, scored both goals in Uruguay's 2-1 victory over England having missed the opening match as he recovered from knee surgery, and until the incident had kept control of his temper during a bruising game.

    Sponsors review deal

    Suarez risks losing lucrative commercial deals following his bite on a World Cup opponent, with poker brand 888 saying on Wednesday it was reviewing its sponsorship agreement with him. 

    "Following the allegations made against Luis Suarez in regards to his behavior during Uruguay's World Cup match against Italy, 888poker is seriously reviewing its relationship with the player as we will not tolerate any unsporting behavior," 888poker said in a statement on Wednesday.

    Suarez also has an endorsement deal with German sportswear company Adidas who have so far not commented on his behavior. He has also been advertising the Beats headphones worn by many of the world's top players.

    Germany's Kahn, former biter, weighs in

    Oliver Kahn, who once nibbled on the neck of a Bundesliga opponent and went after another with a kung-fu-style kick in the same game, believes he understands what is going on inside the head of the Uruguayan striker.

    The former Germany goalkeeper escaped punishment for the twin outbursts against Borussia Dortmund in a 1999 Bundesliga match. A decade later Kahn admitted he was under so much strain at the time that he lost control.

    "That kind of behavior is usually associated with animals," said Kahn of Suarez.

    "In my mind, that's the wrong way to channel your internal tensions," added Kahn, who is now working as a pundit for Germany's ZDF television at the World Cup in Brazil.

    "We saw in the last match [against England] that he was nearly crying. Perhaps that behaviour was a last desperate attempt to release some of the enormous pressure building up inside him and it was the only way to let some of the tension out. For me, there's no other explanation."

    Kahn is remembered in Germany not only for his heroics for Bayern Munich, whom he led to the 2001 Champions League title, and his 86 caps for Germany, but also for nibbling on the neck of Dortmund's Heiko Herrlich and going after Stephane Chapuisat in the same match.

    It took more than a decade for Kahn to admit that he made a mistake.

    "That was the zenith of my aggression and it erupted inside of me," Kahn told the Sueddeutsche Zeitung in 2010.

    Click here to check out our special World Cup site

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: 1worldnow from: Earth
    June 27, 2014 4:53 AM
    I don't know what all the fuss is all about! I mean, this is the manliest sport in history with the biting, and scratching, and hair-pulling, slapping, eye-gouging, nose-picking..........oooops......I was thinking of Women's Golf!

    by: Alex Kwasi Adevu from: Accra Adentan Ghana
    June 25, 2014 11:50 AM
    Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.
    what can of human bean is this.so fifa can't u guys ban this notorious football forever ?

    by: Concerned Citizen
    June 25, 2014 9:24 AM
    ""We needed to win, so if you have to hit you hit, if you have to bite you bite," said Barbara Giordano, a 26-year-old law student in Montevideo."

    I hope every law practice in Uruguay hears about this. It is shocking that someone who intends to pursue a career in law would hold such a belief. How can you uphold the law if your attitude is to do whatever it takes to win regardless of the fact that it's illegal?!?! This sort of person is just trouble waiting to happen even for a criminal defense law firm.

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