USA Votes 2012

Final US Presidential Debate to Be Held Monday

Mideast Likely Will Be Focus at Third Presidential Debatei
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Dan Robinson
October 19, 2012 11:41 PM
Monday's third and final presidential election debate in Boca Raton, Florida, focuses on foreign policy. VOA Senior White House correspondent Dan Robinson reports that the Middle East is expected to be in the spotlight.

Mideast Likely Will Be Focus at Third Presidential Debate

The third and final U.S. presidential debate takes place Monday in Boca Raton, Florida, devoted entirely to foreign policy.  It remains to be seen what impact it will have on voter assessments of President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney less than three weeks before the U.S. election.

In their first two debates, both men sparred over the Middle East, the killing of Americans in Libya, the U.S. response to Syria's civil war, Iran's nuclear ambitions, and trade with China.

Their final encounter could bring a somewhat deeper examinations of these issues.  For President Obama, a key question is whether his perceived advantage on national security matters will bring any more strength in polling numbers.

Dewey Clayton, professor of political science at the University of Louisville in Kentucky, says questions about how President Obama has handled Libya and Syria have given Romney an opening.

"There is clearly plenty of fodder out here to have a spirited debate on foreign policy, I think clearly it will give both candidates an opportunity to talk about how they may do things differently, whether it is withdrawing troops from Afghanistan or whether it is just clearly talking about maintaining a strong national defense," said Clayton.

On Libya, Romney has been on the attack, asserting that the president has mishandled events there and in the broader Middle East.

"There were many days that passed before we knew whether this was a spontaneous demonstration or actually whether it was a terrorist attack.  And there was no demonstration involved, it was a terrorist attack and it took a long time for that to be told to the American people," said Romney at the second presidential debate at New York's Hofstra University.

Some analysts say Americans, and people in other countries, have been left wondering how Mitt Romney's approach would differ from President Obama on, for example, Iran's nuclear program or the U.S. response to the Arab Spring.  

Danielle Pletka, of the conservative American Enterprise Institute.

"I think for outsiders who are trying to get a grip on either what does the next four years mean for us if Barack Obama is re-elected, what does the next four years mean for us if Mitt Romney is elected, you're not quite sure where it's going," Pletka said.

Tamara Cofman Wittes of the Brookings Institution Saban Center for Middle East Policy, says each candidate constructed a narrative about the Middle East:  Governor Romney warning about American weakness, President Obama emphasizing closure of an earlier chapter of U.S. policy.  

Cofman suggests this potential negative side effect.

"The notion of trying to use events in the Middle East to build a narrative that is helpful to your election campaign, might well be dismaying to people living in the region, to see events on the ground that are of such magnitude for Arab citizens treated as, in essence, a political football in our election campaign," Cofman explained.

Shadi Hamid, director of research at the Brookings Doha Center, points to what he calls a bigger question hanging over each side's arguments.

"There is a bigger question here about what is the role of U.S. leadership post-Arab Spring and how do others in the region perceive that leadership," said Hamid.

On the campaign trail, President Obama emphasizes accomplishments such as ending the U.S military role in Iraq, drawing down U.S. forces in Afghanistan, eliminating Osama bin-Laden, and decimating al-Qaida's leadership.

Governor Romney says Obama's Middle East policy is "unraveling", while on other issues such as trade relations with China he pledges to get tougher than the president has been.

Daniel Serwer, of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, says the most serious foreign policy discussion may not come until after the election.

"The level of generality and the level of polarization don't lend themselves to a lot of serious discussion," said Serwer.  "In an odd sort of way, you see that in the Romney stance, because Romney while criticizing the administration on Iraq, on Afghanistan, on Iran has put forward very few distinct proposals on those subjects and the reason for that is it is hard to think up better things to do."

While the American public remains primarily focused on the economy and job creation, opinion surveys suggest Mitt Romney may have chipped away somewhat at President Obama's dominance on national security and foreign policy issues.

A CNN poll after the second debate showed Obama leading Governor Romney 49 to 47 percent on the question of ability to handle foreign affairs.
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by: martin sammy from: ghana
October 22, 2012 10:25 PM
Rommey is confused. He is does not seem to be in control of the facts


by: John from: NY
October 19, 2012 11:17 PM
Why doesnt the moderator ask Obama why he continues to deny Islamic terror as a source of attacks on the U.S.? He initially dismissed the Fort Hood, Christmas Day, and Times Square attacks as acts of terrorism, despite clear links to al-Qaida and/or the Taliban. WHY MR. PRESIDENT WHY?


by: Malek Towghi from: E.Lansing, MI, USA
October 19, 2012 7:02 PM
Now that President Barack Obama has diagnosed Governor Romney's problem, "romneysia" as the president called it today, I don't think Mitt has any chance of winning the upcoming Monday debate.

In Response

by: Jason from: China
October 21, 2012 10:03 AM
In contrast, I think Governor Romney has a big chance of winning the Presidential election. He has very obvious opinion on the forign policy and economic. But unfortunately, there will be a more tough policy on Chinese companies. It is no equal.


by: Stevce from: West
October 19, 2012 5:52 PM
Obama's foreign policy is unraveling right before our very eyes. Good luck Barry on Monday...how you gonna lie your way out of what's happening on our T.V sets?


by: Artie Burris from: Irving , Texas
October 19, 2012 5:23 PM
I hope Romney tells Obama that He will NOT BE BOWING TO ANY ARABS and will have a strong Armed Force.But Most of all The bowing part. . And will put America Back To God

In Response

by: Malek Towghi from: USA
October 20, 2012 3:16 PM
For most of the Republicans and some Democrats, "strong Armed Forces" means enriching the Military-Industrial-Business-Oil-Complex by starting un-winnable unending wars funded by American taxpayers or by loaned money to be paid by our children and grandchildren. That thousands and thousands of young American men and women are killed -- and maimed physically and/or mentally -- is of no concern for them because most of the recruits come from the economically lower classes. These are the modern slave gladiators of our 21st century Patrician class.


by: Anonymous
October 19, 2012 5:04 PM
Ugh, wrong... the final US Presidential debate will be on Tuesday, for the third party candidates who have been unfairly excluded from the Obama/Romney staged "debates". It will be hosted by Larry King so don't just assume it will be inconsiquential

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