News / Middle East

France: World Must Respond if Syria Used Chemical Weapons

International Community Urges Force in Response to Alleged Syrian Chemical Weaponsi
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August 22, 2013
International anger and frustration is growing following allegations Syrian forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad used chemical weapons against civilians in the suburbs of Damascus. Opposition activists say hundreds are dead. And now some countries are saying the time has come to respond with force. VOA's Jeff Seldin has more.

Related report: International Community Urges Force in Response to Alleged Syrian Chemical Weapons

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VOA News
France says the international community must respond with force if opposition allegations that Syrian forces used chemical weapons in an attack near Damascus prove true.
 
But French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius on Thursday ruled out the use of ground troops.
 
Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu is also urging international action, saying a "red line" has been crossed in Syria.
 
Activists say Syrian forces launched new bombing attacks Thursday in the eastern Ghouta area, where a day earlier the opposition accused government troops of killing many civilians with chemical weapons.
 
Syria denies accusations

The Syrian government has denied the chemical weapons allegations.  It says the opposition is trying to distract United Nations inspectors who are in the country to investigate government claims that rebels used chemical weapons earlier this year.
 
The U.N. Security Council held an urgent session Wednesday to discuss the situation in Syria.
 
U.N. Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson expressed concern about the new allegations and said U.N. officials were discussing gaining access to the sites with the Syrian government.
 
"This represents, no matter what the conclusions are, a serious escalation with grave humanitarian consequences and human consequences," El We very much hope that we will be able to conduct the investigation," Eliasson noted.
 
Western powers urge inspection

The Arab League and Western powers, including the United States, also urged Syria's government to allow U.N. inspectors to immediately visit the sites.
 
Russia, a key Syrian ally, accused the opposition of committing a "premeditated provocation" by making claims about mass casualties from a government chemical attack soon after the arrival of the U.N. inspectors. 
 
Syrian opposition reports of the death toll from Wednesday's attacks varied widely. Opposition leader George Sabra of the exiled Syrian National Coalition told a news conference in Istanbul the number of those killed is as high as 1,300.  His claim could not be independently verified.  
 
Syrian activists said government troops unleashed an artillery and rocket barrage against several Damascus suburbs, with some of the weapons allegedly containing chemical elements. They posted videos online showing scores of bodies of adults and children laid out on the floor of makeshift clinics with no visible signs of injuries. 
 
The White House said it is "deeply concerned" by the reports and called for those responsible for using chemical weapons to be held accountable. It said the Syrian government must allow U.N. investigators to "examine and collect physical evidence without any interference or manipulation."
 
The mandate of the U.N. inspection team is limited to establishing whether chemical weapons - including sarin and other toxic nerve agents - were used, not who used them. 
 
The Syrian government also has restricted the mission to investigating several specific incidents, including a March attack in the Aleppo suburb of Khan al-Assal.

  • Activists wear gas masks as they look for dead bodies and collect samples to check for chemical weapon use in Zamalka, Damascus, August 22, 2013.
  • An activist wearing a gas mask stands next to a dead dog as he looks for bodies to collect samples to check for chemical weapon use, in Zamalka, Damascus, August 22, 2013.
  • Syrian activists inspect the bodies of people they say were killed by toxic gas near Damascus, August 21, 2013.
  • A man sits in a hospital near two children who activists say were affected by toxic gas near Damascus, August 21, 2013.
  • People, affected by what activists say is toxic gas, are treated at a hospital in the Duma neighborhood of Damascus August 21, 2013.
  • A youth, affected by what activists say is toxic gas, is treated at a hospital near Damascus, August 21, 2013.
  • A Syrian military soldier holds his Ak-47 with a sticker of Syrian President Bashar Assad and Arabic that reads, "Syria is fine," as he stands guard at a check point on Baghdad street, in Damascus, August 21, 2013.
  • A Syrian military soldier checks the trunk of a car at a check point on Baghdad street, in Damascus, August 21, 2013.

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