News / Africa

Chad Says Forces Killed Top Al-Qaida Commander in Mali

This image released on December 25, 2012 by Sahara Media, shows one of the leaders of al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), Abdelhamid Abou Zeid in an undisclosed place. This image released on December 25, 2012 by Sahara Media, shows one of the leaders of al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), Abdelhamid Abou Zeid in an undisclosed place.
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This image released on December 25, 2012 by Sahara Media, shows one of the leaders of al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), Abdelhamid Abou Zeid in an undisclosed place.
This image released on December 25, 2012 by Sahara Media, shows one of the leaders of al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), Abdelhamid Abou Zeid in an undisclosed place.
Anne Look
— French and Chadian forces battling Islamist militants in Mali's remote northeastern mountains are believed to have killed a top al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb commander known as Abdelhamid Abou Zeid, though the fate of at least four French hostages that Abou Zeid was thought to be holding nearby remains unknown. 

Chad's president says Abou Zeid and another al-Qaida commander were among those killed in ongoing military operations in the area. French authorities are not confirming the reports.

Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM)

- Formed in the 1990s to fight Algeria's secular government
- Wants to rid North Africa of western influence and impose sharia
- Estimated to have amassed $100 million in kidnapping ransoms
- Most members are from outside Mali
The Algerian-born jihadist, if his death is confirmed, could be a significant blow in the ongoing war against the al-Qaida-linked rebels who seized control of northern Mali last April.

Zeid has been described as inflexible, cruel, violent, audacious, intelligent, radical and without pity. He was born in Algeria and commands a southern battalion of al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, known as AQIM.  His command is known to be one of AQIM's most radical factions.

A smuggler by trade, Abou Zeid fought in a succession of armed Algerian Islamist movements in the 1990s.  He headed south to Mali about a decade ago as part of the Algerian-led Salafist movement that would ultimately rebrand itself as AQIM in 2006.

Mauritanian journalist and AQIM expert Isselmou Ould Moustapha said in killing Abou Zeid, the French and allied forces in Mali would be knocking out a formidable enemy.

He says Abou Zeid is one of the "most daring and determined" commanders that coalition forces currently face in Mali, even though Abou Zeid does not currently hold the post of "emir of the Sahara," or the chief of AQIM southern operations. 

Abdelhamid Abou Zeid

- Also known as Abid Hammadou
- A top leader of al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb
- Designated a terrorist by U.S. and U.N.
- Blamed for several kidnappings for ransom of tourists in the Sahel
- Believe to be behind execution of a British and French hostage
- Led attack on Mauritanian military outpost in 2005
- Established AQIM camp in Mali to train terrorists
Moustapha says over the past decade, Abou Zeid has taken on the Mauritanian, Nigerien and Malian armies and made a name for himself engineering kidnappings in 2008, 2009 and 2010.  He characterizes Abou Zeid as a powerful field commander who could mobilize fighters as determined as him.

He rose to international infamy for his involvement in kidnapping dozens of European hostages in the Sahel, beginning in 2003.

The operations took in millions of dollars in ransoms, money that analysts say was key to funding AQIM, while all the while being known as a tough negotiator.

Abou Zeid is believed to be behind the executions of two hostages: British tourist Edwin Dyer in 2009 and French aid worker Michel Germaneau in 2010.

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Comments
     
by: Brad Naksuthin
March 03, 2013 9:04 AM


How come the French army can march into Mali and rout the Islamist in a matter of weeks...and the most expensive and best equipped army on earth has been stuck in Afghanistan for 11 years now...with no end in sight...fighting a rag tag bunch of illiterate Muslim farmers who have no tanks, no helicopters, no nuclear submarines, no aircraft carriers, no drones, no night vision goggles, no satellite communications trucks, no THAAD radar systems, no ICMBs, no SM3.....

I'm getting the sneaky feeling that US military contractors don't really want to see Afghanistan come to an end at all. so they are pushing their Pentagon minions to keep the war going on indefinitely. Ten billion dollars a month in Afghanistan is real incentive to keep us fighting for another 11 years


by: Anonymous
March 01, 2013 4:19 PM
One more down, one billion to go ...

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