News / Africa

Gambia Withdraws from Commonwealth

Gambian President Yahya Jammeh stands outside the Sipopo Conference Center ahead of the opening session of the 17th African Union Summit, in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, June 2011. (file photo)Gambian President Yahya Jammeh stands outside the Sipopo Conference Center ahead of the opening session of the 17th African Union Summit, in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, June 2011. (file photo)
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Gambian President Yahya Jammeh stands outside the Sipopo Conference Center ahead of the opening session of the 17th African Union Summit, in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, June 2011. (file photo)
Gambian President Yahya Jammeh stands outside the Sipopo Conference Center ahead of the opening session of the 17th African Union Summit, in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, June 2011. (file photo)
James Butty
President Yahya Jammeh of The Gambia has unilaterally taken his country out of the Commonwealth, becoming the first African leader to do so since President Robert Mugabe took Zimbabwe out in 2003. 

A statement reportedly issued late Wednesday said the “government has withdrawn its membership of the British Commonwealth and decided that the Gambia will never be a member of any neo-colonial institution and will never be a party to any institution that represents an extension of colonialism”.

Gambian-born Sulayman Nyang, senior professor and former chair of the African Studies Department at Howard University in Washington, D.C. said some western governments’ rejection of Jammeh’s anti-gay rhetoric and dismal human rights record might be two reasons behind his decision.

“If he [Jammeh] made this statement, there are two underlying reasons behind the decision. One, in my opinion is the fact that when President Jammeh went to the UN, he came out categorically against the gay movement. So for that reason, he is definitely at loggerheads with the Prime Minister of Great Britain who has been very strong in support of gay groups,” he said.

Some western governments, Britain in particular, has threatened to withhold aid because of Jammeh’s anti-gay stance.

Nyang said the Gambian leader has adopted the old African nationalist position not to kowtow to imperialists.

Addressing parliament last year, Jammeh some western governments of trying to instill gay culture in the Gambia.

“If you are going to give us aid money for men and men or for women and women to marry, please leave it. We don’t need your aid money because as far as I am the President of the Gambia, you will never see that happen in this country,” the Gambian leader said.

Nyang said Jammeh’s notorious human rights record could also another reason for taking his country out of the Commonwealth.

“When all the facts come to light, you are going to see people looking at Jammeh at two levels. Those who are fighting for human rights will tell the story of Jammeh and his dictatorship. So, what I am emphasizing once again is that this decision of Jammeh is also occasioned not only by his state the UN against gay groups, but also because of the fact that he is very much aware of the fact that those who opposed to him are going to connect the dots, and some of those dots will lead him to [to former Liberian President] Charles Taylor and all the dictators in Africa,” he said.

He said even African nationalists such as Ghana’s founding president Kwame Nkrumah never broke away from the Commonwealth.
Butty interview with Nyang
Butty interview with Nyangi
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“The only time Kwame Nkrumah only had problem was when [former British] Prime Minister [Harold] Wilson gave that famous, unacceptable statement to Africans at the time. And there were some Africans who were beginning to have the idea that if Wilson is not willing to suppress the government of Ian Smith in Southern Rhodesia, then why should we be dancing to the British music?” Nyang said.

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Comments
     
by: John Lloyd Suwaneh from: Senegal
October 05, 2013 3:51 PM
Let's face it, the king kong called jammeh has once failed to provide support to his country, all in the ame of drawing away from colonialism. As a gambian, i am deeply ashamed of how he governs the country and I am ashamed of how hes trying to cover his evil tracks all in the name of loving his country. he's a pig, a donkey and most importantly, he looks like a black buddha. Get a life president Jammeh, no one cares about whether youre in commonwealth or not.
PIG


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
October 03, 2013 2:32 PM
Repression and anti human rights, bad. But when has democracy changed its meaning to return to colonialism? The way western democracies want to force change to African, Asian and Arabian ways of life has become something to raise questions about. Is it for good? Whose good? With this revolt, there may be others following. Aid does not mean Britain or any country for that matter should control another country. Fundamental Human Rights we were told regarded right to food, clothing and shelter.

When democratization added other fringes to make up the lapse as becoming norms, it becomes a distortion. It is because of human right excesses that the globe has wormed and is warming beyond human endurance; in like manner, excessive social rights without bridle will lead to the earth looking for escape. Why not allow societies to remain in their tradition while the West goes haywire: if it become attractive, others will copy, but if it fails them, others will thank their God for staying afar off. Meddlesome-ness is not democratic. The West and Britain in particular should stop meddling in other countries' affairs in the name of aid, democracy or commonwealth. The era of slavery is past and will never return no matter how much one tries to return it through aid.

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