News / Africa

WHO: Kenya at High Risk for Transmission of Ebola

A health worker assists a colleague with his protective gear as they collect the body of a man suspected to have died from the Ebola virus in Monrovia, Liberia, Aug. 12, 2014.
A health worker assists a colleague with his protective gear as they collect the body of a man suspected to have died from the Ebola virus in Monrovia, Liberia, Aug. 12, 2014.
VOA News

The World Health Organization classified Kenya as a high-risk area for transmission of the deadly Ebola virus on Wednesday, as Sierra Leone reported that a second leading physician has died of the disease.

Even though there have been no reported cases of Ebola in Kenya, the country’s role as a transportation hub in East Africa makes it more vulnerable to the disease, WHO said.

WHO representative Dr. Custodia Mandlhate told reporters on Wednesday that WHO has classified Kenya as level 2, meaning at high risk for transmission.

Ebola outbreaks, deaths in West Africa, as of August 11, 2014Ebola outbreaks, deaths in West Africa, as of August 11, 2014
x
Ebola outbreaks, deaths in West Africa, as of August 11, 2014
Ebola outbreaks, deaths in West Africa, as of August 11, 2014

In Sierre Leone, chief medical officer Brima Kargbo said Modupeh Cole, a senior physician in the capital Freetown who had been "instrumental in the fight against the Ebola virus," had died of the disease.

Cole's death came two weeks after the country's only virologist and leading Ebola expert, Humarr Khan, succumbed to the tropical disease.

Also, the last known doses of ZMapp, an experimental drug to combat Ebola, were to arrive Wednesday in Liberia, where the government is scrambling to save two infected doctors.

They would be the first Africans known to receive the controversial treatment.

The debate over experimental treatments and vaccines will continue, however, as Canada has promised to donate 800 to 1,000 doses of its untested Ebola vaccine to WHO. Questions already are being asked about who will get it and how scientists will determine if it works.

Nigeria death toll rises

In Nigeria, an ECOWAS staff member has become the third person in the country to die of Ebola fever, the Economic Community of West African States said.

Jatto Asihu Abdulqudir, 36, a protocol assistant, had traveled to an ECOWAS function in Nigeria with Patrick Sawyer, a Liberian man who was ill with Ebola and flew to Lagos last month.

Abdulqudir later fell ill and had been placed under quarantine.

The country has reported 10 cases of Ebola since Sawyer arrived on July 20.

WHO reported on Wednesday that there were 128 new Ebola cases and 56 deaths in West Africa in the past two days, raising the death toll from the worst ever outbreak of the disease to 1,069.

Since the outbreak was identified in March, there have been a total of 1,975 confirmed, probable and suspected Ebola cases in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria, WHO said in a statement.

Most of the deaths have occurred in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

Nigerian nurse skips quarantine

Separately, a nurse who had had close contact with Ebola victim Sawyer skipped quarantine in Lagos and headed to her home in the southeastern city of Enugu, where she had contact with 20 other people, the government said on Wednesday.

Information Minister Labaran Maku said the nurse, herself a suspected case, and her 20 contacts were all under surveillance in Enugu, bringing the total number being watched in the country to 189.

Her action highlights the risk of an outbreak in Lagos, a southwestern megacity of 21 million people, the majority of whose inhabitants are migrants from other parts of the country and other West African countries.

“One of the nurses that was involved with the treatment of the index case, unfortunately, disobeyed medical instructions and somehow traveled to Enugu,” Maku told reporters after a weekly cabinet meeting with President Goodluck Jonathan.

AU summit

The outbreak has prompted the African Union (AU) to expand a September summit in Burkina Faso to address the issue.

AU social affairs commissioner Mustapha Sidiki Kaloko told the VOA the AU does not believe Burkina Faso's close proximity to Ebola-stricken countries will be a safety risk.

"We are aware of the problems. We are aware of the precautions that we need to take," Kaloko said. "But remember, there are about 2 million people in Ouagadougou and they are being looked after in terms of the issues of the Ebola epidemic. So, the institutions are going to be put in place."

In another development, the Confederation of African Football said Wednesday that two African Cup qualifying matches that were set to be held in Guinea and Sierra Leone next month would be moved to other countries.   

The group did not announce the new venues.

Meanwhile, Germany urged its citizens to leave Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia due to the Ebola outbreak in those West African nations hardest hit by the virus.

The foreign ministry announced the government directive on Wednesday, but said the appeal for nationals to leave did not apply to medical workers or diplomatic staff.

The disease has no known cure.

Mohammed Yusuf contributed to this report from Nairobi. Some information for this report provided by Reuters and AFP.

You May Like

UN Ambassador Power Highlights Plight of Women Prisoners

She launches the 'Free the 20' campaign, aimed at profiling women being deprived of their freedom around the world More

Satellite Launch Sparks Spectacular Light Show

A slight delay in a satellite launch lit up the Florida sky early this morning More

Fleeing IS Killings in Syria, Family Reaches Bavaria

Exhausted, scared and under-nourished, Khalil and Maha's tale mirrors those of thousands of refugees from war-torn countries who have left their homes in the hopes of finding a better life More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Major Variola from: US
August 13, 2014 11:26 PM
The west will mine harbors and crater airfields. Anyone leaving will be shot or sunk on sight. Quarantine with extreme prejudice. Snipers sans frontieres.

Civilization is a choice. So is bushmeat (with fries and a shake?)

Choose now. Consider nuclear carpet bombing. Choose soon, or else.

Real estate and traffic gets much better after this plague. Much nicer than war or famine. Birth control would be better, but, ebola.

by: kennedy l.kidzugane from: mombasa
August 13, 2014 7:25 PM
kenya,kenya.aleading country in tourism in this continent,a country that does not care of the risks of ebola but"MONEY"are we better off than germany?if they can stop any business with the w.african states afected then who are we "KENYA AIRWAYS"?

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Nobel Prize Winner Malala Talks to VOAi
X
August 31, 2015 2:17 AM
Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai met with VOA's Deewa service in Washington Sunday to talk about women’s rights and unveil a trailer for her new documentary. VOA's Katherine Gypson has more.
Video

Video Nobel Prize Winner Malala Talks to VOA

Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai met with VOA's Deewa service in Washington Sunday to talk about women’s rights and unveil a trailer for her new documentary. VOA's Katherine Gypson has more.
Video

Video War, Drought Threaten Iraq's Marshlands

Iraq's southern wetlands are in crisis. These areas are the spawning ground for Gulf fisheries, a resting place for migrating wildfowl, and source of livelihood for fishermen and herders. Faith Lapidus has more.
Video

Video Colombians Flee Venezuela as Border Crisis Escalates

Hundreds of Colombians have fled Venezuela since last week, amid an escalating border crisis between the two countries. Last week, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro ordered the closure of a key border crossing after smugglers injured three Venezuelan soldiers and a civilian. The president also ordered the deportation of Colombians who are in Venezuela illegally. Zlatica Hoke reports.
Video

Video Rebuilding New Orleans' Music Scene

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina inundated New Orleans, threatening to wash away its vibrant musical heritage along with its neighborhoods, the beat goes on. As Bronwyn Benito and Faith Lapidus report, a Musicians' Village is preserving the city's unique sound.
Video

Video In Russia, Auto Industry in Tailspin

Industry insiders say country relies too heavily on imports as inflation cuts too many consumers out of the market. Daniel Schearf has more from Moscow.
Video

Video Scientist Calls Use of Fetal Tissue in Medical Research Essential

An anti-abortion group responsible for secret recordings of workers at a women's health care organization claims the workers shown are offering baby parts for sale, a charge the organization strongly denies. While the selling of fetal tissue is against the law in the United States, abortion and the use of donated fetal tissue for medical research are both legal. VOA’s Julie Taboh reports.
Video

Video Next to Iran, Climate at Forefront of Obama Agenda

President Barack Obama this week announced new initiatives aimed at making it easier for Americans to access renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Obama is not slowing down when it comes to pushing through climate change measures, an issue he says is the greatest threat to the country’s national security. VOA correspondent Aru Pande has more from the White House.
Video

Video Arctic Draws International Competition for Oil

A new geopolitical “Great Game” is underway in earth’s northernmost region, the Arctic, where Russia has claimed a large area for resource development and President Barack Obama recently approved Shell Oil Company’s test-drilling project in an area under U.S. control. Greg Flakus reports.
Video

Video Philippine Maritime Police: Chinese Fishermen a Threat to Country’s Security

China and the Philippines both claim maritime rights in the South China Sea.  That includes the right to fish in those waters. Jason Strother reports on how the Philippines is catching Chinese nationals it says are illegal poachers. He has the story from Palawan province.
Video

Video China's Spratly Island Building Said to Light Up the Night 'Like A City'

Southeast Asian countries claim China has illegally seized territory in the Spratly islands. It is especially a concern for a Philippine mayor who says Beijing is occupying parts of his municipality. Jason Strother reports from the capital of Palawan province, Puerto Princesa.
Video

Video Ages-old Ice Reveals Secrets of Climate Change

Ice caps don't just exist at the world's poles. There are also tropical ice caps, and the largest sits atop the Peruvian Andes - but it is melting, quickly, and may be gone within the next 20 years. George Putic reports scientists are now rushing to take samples to get at the valuable information about climate change locked in the ice.

VOA Blogs