News / Middle East

Number of Displaced People Hits 50 Million, Highest Since WWII

New Waves of Refugees Draw Attention to Long-term Trendsi
X
June 20, 2014 4:09 AM
Conflicts in Iraq, Ukraine and Syria have created waves of refugees, drawing renewed attention to the large number of people who have been displaced for years. As the global community observes World Refugee Day on Friday, the number of displaced people has grown to more than 45 million - the highest level in the past two decades. Zlatica Hoke reports that armed conflicts remain the dominant cause.

Watch related video from VOA's Zlatica Hoke.

Lisa Schlein
— The U.N. refugee agency’s annual Global Trends report says more than 50 million people were forcibly displaced by conflict at the end of last year, the highest number since World War II.

As the world marks World Refugee Day, these staggering figures are nothing to celebrate. Of the more than 50 million people forcibly displaced, the report finds 16.7 million are refugees and more than twice that number, 33.3 million, are people displaced within their own countries.

U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres said these growing numbers are a result of the multiplication of new crises. He said the alarming spectacle of seeing millions of people forced to flee for their lives confirms the inability of nations to resolve or prevent conflict.
 
  • An Afghan woman holds a child as she waits with others to have a medical check-up at a health clinic set up by the UNHCR to mark World Refugee Day in Islamabad, June 20, 2014.
  • An Afghan refugee has her eyes tested at a health clinic set up by the UNHCR to mark World Refugee Day in Islamabad, June 20, 2014.
  • Refugees, who fled the military offensive against the Pakistani militants in North Waziristan, sit on a bed in Bannu, Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, June 19, 2014.
  • A Palestinian man works at his shop in Al-Shati refugee camp in Gaza City, June 19, 2014.
  • Syrian refugees walk outside their tents, at a Syrian refugee camp in the eastern Lebanese town of Majdal Anjar, Lebanon, June 19, 2014.
  • Afghan refugees wait for a transport to carry a sick man to a hospital while standing by him in a refugee camp situated in slums of Islamabad, Pakistan, June 19, 2014.
  • An Eritrean refugee poses for a picture inside her home in Khartoum, Sudan, June 19, 2014.
  • Iraqis who have fled the violence in their hometown of Mosul line up at Khazir refugee camp outside of Irbil, June 16, 2014.
  • Sinnuyar Baekon sits in front of her hut at a refugee camp outside Sittwe, the capital city of the Rakhine state, Myanmar, June 9, 2014.
  • Members of "Clowns Without Borders," perform for children at a Syrian refugee camp in the eastern town of Chtoura, in Bekaa valley, Lebanon, June 6, 2014.

“All these conflicts are not only creating a dramatic humanitarian situation, but they represent today a major threat to global peace and security-a threat that is felt everywhere.  So, solidarity with today’s refugees is not only a matter of generosity, it is, as I usually say more and more a matter of enlightened self-interest,” said Guterres.

The report finds the massive increase in forcible displacement last year was driven mainly by the war in Syria, with 2.5 million Syrian refugees and 6.5 million internally displaced.
 
The report said major new displacement also has occurred in Africa, notably in Central African Republic, and South Sudan. Overall, the biggest refugee populations under UNHCR care are Afghans, Syrians and Somalis. They account for more than half of the global refugee total.

 
Major Source Countries of RefugeesMajor Source Countries of Refugees
x
Major Source Countries of Refugees
Major Source Countries of Refugees
The United Nations notes 50 percent of the world’s displaced are children. The report says more than one million people have sought asylum in 2013, most in developed countries. They include a record 25,300 claims from separated or unaccompanied children.
 
Though most asylum claims are made in the West, High Commissioner Guterres said the perception that all refugees are fleeing to wealthy northern countries in search of a better life and not for protection is false.
 
“The truth is that 86 percent of the world refugees live in the developing world.  And, again this is the highest percentage since the beginning of the century.  It compares to 70 percent only 10 years ago.  So, the trend in the world is not only to have more and more refugees, but to have more and more refugees staying in the developing world,” said Guterres. 
 
While the forcible displacement crisis continues to escalate, the UNHCR says its ability to find long-term solutions for these people is waning.  It says last year it only succeeded in voluntarily returning 414,600 refugees to their homes of origin - the fourth lowest level of refugee returns in almost a quarter century.

You May Like

Uganda Court Annuls Anti-Gay Law

Court says law was passed in parliament without enough members present for a full quorum More

Multimedia Thailand Makes Efforts to Improve Conditions for Migrant Laborers

In Thailand, its not uncommon for parents to bring their children to work; one company, in-collaboration with other organizations, address safety concerns More

In Indonesia, Jihad Video Raises Concern

Video calls on Indonesians to join Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, ISIL More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Asongwe from: Cameroon
June 25, 2014 3:35 PM
It is a pity to note tha hatred among humans can be 1 is to 5 persons ratio and arms production promote the indiscriminate use , thus many persons are displaced let the world revue the reseon behind arms production.All these cost money and human life .


by: Elijah
June 21, 2014 9:35 AM
Antonio Guterres sir, the list is incomplete - ZIMBABWE


by: Manuel from: Mexico
June 20, 2014 2:48 PM
Almost all of these conflicts involve Muslims, but we know Islam is the "religion of peace" so it should all just be a big coincidence.


by: MUSTAFA from: INDIA
June 20, 2014 1:45 PM
This is good news for sponsor of Terrorist group in respective countries. Saudi Arab, Qatar, Kuwait and Turkey are the key players in current conflict. They must be proud to see their achievement in practical shape.


by: meanbill from: USA
June 20, 2014 10:01 AM
IT'S A FACT? -- Because of the US, EU, and NATO countries political interference in (non-European Union) countries, of Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Yugoslavia, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Yemen, Syria, and now Ukraine, and spreading now to bordering countries, (over 50 million innocent people have been forcibly displaced -- by the violence, killings, destruction and wars, that the US, EU, and NATO countries brought to them, when they interfered in the politics of their countries? --- (IF ONLY, they hadn't interfered in these other countries politics?), 50 million innocent people would be "living" in the home country today?

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
In Thailand, Some Efforts to Improve Conditions For Migrant Laborersi
X
Steve Herman
August 01, 2014 6:22 PM
Thailand has been facing increasing international scrutiny as a hub of human trafficking and slave labor. Some of the kingdom’s companies are striving to improve working conditions, especially for the millions of migrant laborers from surrounding countries. VOA Correspondent Steve Herman in Bangkok takes a look at one initiative for children at construction sites
Video

Video In Thailand, Some Efforts to Improve Conditions For Migrant Laborers

Thailand has been facing increasing international scrutiny as a hub of human trafficking and slave labor. Some of the kingdom’s companies are striving to improve working conditions, especially for the millions of migrant laborers from surrounding countries. VOA Correspondent Steve Herman in Bangkok takes a look at one initiative for children at construction sites
Video

Video Public Raises its Voice on Power Plant Pollution

In the United States, proposed rules to cut pollution from the nation’s 600 coal-fired power plants are generating a heated debate. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, charged with writing and implementing the plan, has already received 300,000 written comments. As VOA’s Rosanne Skirble reports, another 1,600 people are lining up this week at EPA headquarters and at satellite offices around the country to give their testimony in person.
Video

Video Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukraine

The downing of the Malaysian airliner two weeks ago, and allegations that Russians are shelling Ukrainian troops across the border, have moved the information war swirling around the Ukrainian conflict to a new level. VOA's Al Pessin reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video When Fighting Eases, Gazans Line Up at Bakeries

When there is a lull in the conflict in Gaza, residents who have been hunkered down in their apartments rush out to stock up on food and other necessities. Probably the most important destination is the local bakery. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Gaza City.
Video

Video China Investigates Powerful Former Security Chief

The public in China is welcoming the Communist Party's decision to investigate one of the country's once most powerful politicians, former domestic security chief Zhou Yongkang. Analysts say the move by President Xi Jinping is not only an effort to win more support for the party, but an essential step to furthering much needed economic reforms and removing those who would stand in the way of change. VOA's Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
Video

Video US-Funded Program Offers Honduran Children Alternative to Illegal Immigration

President Obama and Central American leaders recently agreed to come up with a plan to address poverty and crime in the region that is fueling the surge of young migrants trying to illegally enter the United States. VOA’s Brian Padden looks at one such program in Honduras - funded in part by the United States - which gives street kids not only food and safety but a chance for a better life without, crossing the border.
Video

Video 'Fab Lab' Igniting Revolution in Kenya

The University of Nairobi’s Science and Technology Park is banking on 3-D prototyping to spark a manufacturing revolution in the country. Lenny Ruvaga has more for from Nairobi's so-called “FabLab” for VOA.
Video

Video Immigrant Influx on Texas Border Heats Up Political Debate

Immigrants from Central America continue to cross the U.S.-Mexico border in south Texas, seeking asylum in the United States, as officials grapple with ways to deal with the problem and provide shelter for thousands of minors among the illegal border crossers. As VOA's Greg Flakus reports from Houston, the issue is complicated by internal U.S. politics and U.S. relations with the troubled nations that immigrants are fleeing.

AppleAndroid