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Google Apologizes for Google Doodle Not Honoring D-Day

A Google Doodle of Honinbo Shusaku, a Japanese Go player, was quickly removed from the company's website after the company was criticized for not honoring D-Day.
A Google Doodle of Honinbo Shusaku, a Japanese Go player, was quickly removed from the company's website after the company was criticized for not honoring D-Day.

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Search giant Google has apologized for a row caused by not honoring the 70th anniversary of D-Day via its Google Doodle.

The seach giant instead briefly posted a doodle on its UK site honoring Honinbo Shusaku, a Japanese Go player who was born June 6, 1829.

According to Google, doodles are “the fun, surprising, and sometimes spontaneous changes that are made to the Google logo to celebrate holidays, anniversaries, and the lives of famous artists, pioneers and scientists.”

The Shusaku doodle was quickly taken down from the UK version of Google
and replaced with links to information about the allied invasion of Europe in 1944. The German version of Google, Google.de, still paid homage to Shusaku.

Twitter was awash in criticism.

“I can't help but feel that today's Google Doodle might be missing out on a slightly more important historical event,” tweeted one user.

Another user was less irate.

“Not only is the google doodle not news, the absence of a Google Doodle isn't news either. C'mon people, get a grip.”

A Google spokesperson told VOA that the company “always intended to highlight a new exhibition of imagery and archive material commemorating D-Day on our UK homepage.”

“Unfortunately a technical error crept in and for a short period this morning an international doodle also appeared,” said a spokesman in an email. “We're sorry for the mistake, and we're proud to honor those who took part in D-Day."

They added that the doodle was not ever on the U.S. site, nor was it planned to be.

Google Doodles are often used for major holidays, the birthdays of famous people and even to highlight the Roswell UFO legend.

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by: Kelly Payson from: Biloxi, Mississippi
June 09, 2014 9:17 AM
I have a Google email address and account because I believed it was the best world wide web organization. If I find something better I will change. Now here is why?

Google supports every special interest they can and yet on D-Day they maintained as low a profile as they could. Now they want to apologize. I say an apology isn't good enough. Its obvious they don't care about the Americans who have made the greatest sacrifices to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. They are focused on young business alone and national or Christian sacrifice isn't important enough for them to celebrate. As a career Soldier, I hate war, but just to remember those who believed and cared enough to risk it all for the rest of us is worthy enough for me to take time to show my appreciation. Google celebrates every Tom, Dick or Harriette that dedicated themselves to some societal quibble but when it comes to real sacrifice they quickly throw together some photographs to try and recoup some self-respect.

Speaking of respect, how about the Caesar Chavez memorial on Easter? That broke my heart to think the organization that I have used and supported throughout the years could become so anti-Christian. Now there is the greatest hero of all history! Jesus Christ. Dedicated to the forgiveness and love for all mankind, allowed himself to be executed by one of the most horrible means and He must compete with Caesar Chavez? That is the most disrespectful action of all.

I must apologize for not speaking out until now. I guess that is the problem with all of us in middle-class, Christian America. We don't take punitive action against those organizations that don't support us equally. Organizations like Google that claim they support equality and respect. It is these type of organizations that are actually dividing this country even further along religious, racial, and national lines. Google, you have disrespected every Christian and patriotic American. You have a terrific operational system, but you are definitely demonstrating a turn for the worse in your policies.
Sincerely,
Kelly Payson
PS, Don't forget, that if mankind does not apply the lessons history teaches them, they will continue to make the same errors.

by: Bo Burgess
June 07, 2014 9:05 AM
An entire generation that is now vanishing, and so to seems their legacy and one of their more prominent sacrifices, goes unnoticed by "the world's search engine". The entire event of the day hinged on so many "miracles": a break in the weather, Rommel away to see his wife, Hitler asleep and not to be bothered!
"The Longest Day" was a miracle in its fruition.
It is truly saddening that google would choose to "underlook" all that happened on this day and forward.

by: Dolors Williams from: Corvallis, Oregon
June 06, 2014 11:03 PM
You gutless wonders......of ALL THE DAYS you needed to commemorate you DID NOT. Get your acts together and think of the true sacrifice the 40s generation gave you. Search the D-day invasion and others to get a true feeling of life and courage. You FOOLS. sincerely D

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