News / Asia

Gunmen Kill Senior Haqqani Leader in Pakistan

Local residents and members of the news media gather at spot where Nasiruddin Haqqani, a senior leader of the feared militant Haqqani network, was assassinated at an Afghan bakery in the Bhara Kahu area on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Nov. 11, 20
Local residents and members of the news media gather at spot where Nasiruddin Haqqani, a senior leader of the feared militant Haqqani network, was assassinated at an Afghan bakery in the Bhara Kahu area on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Nov. 11, 20
Ayaz Gul
Gunmen in Pakistan have shot dead the son of Jalaluddin Haqqani, the leader of one of the most powerful Afghan militant groups fighting NATO forces in Afghanistan.  The incident took place late Sunday near the Pakistani capital.
 
Nasiruddin Haqqani was the chief financier and emissary for the al-Qaida-linked insurgent network.
 
Eyewitnesses say that two unidentified assailants riding a motorcycle gunned down the militant leader late Sunday in a residential area (Barakau) on the outskirts of Islamabad.
 
No one has claimed responsibility for the attack.   His body was moved to the North Waziristan tribal district where he was buried in the central town of Miranshah on Monday.  The volatile militant-dominated Pakistani region borders Afghanistan and severs as a major base for Haqqani fighters.
 
The United States branded the network a terrorist organization last year and has long accused Pakistani spy agency, the ISI (Inter-Services Intelligence), of supporting the militant group's deadly actions in Afghanistan.

It was founded by Jalaluddin Haqqani, a veteran guerrilla commander from southeast Afghanistan who rose to prominence fighting Soviet occupation forces in the 1980s.

The United States has repeatedly demanded Islamabad mobilize military forces to uproot Haqqani bases in the Waziristan region.  Pakistan maintains that its troops are stretched too thin dealing with domestic Taliban insurgents.

But critics say Islamabad’s sympathetic approach towards Afghan fugitive insurgents has emboldened the local militancy.

Former Pakistani ambassador to the United States Ashraf Jehangir Qazi says the policy has a major source of suspicions in bilateral relations.  
 
“It is a source of friction like a lot of things are.  It is part of the overall American complaint that the Afghan Taliban or the Afghan resistance led by the Afghan Taliban is able to sort of have safe havens and sanctuaries on Pakistani territory from where they launch attacks on American and Afghan forces.  And this is linked to the internal problems in Pakistan where we have the TTP, the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan, which is similarly based in North Waziristan and they have links to the [outlawed] organizations in other parts of Pakistan," said Qazi.
 
Pakistan’s reluctance to move against militants in North Waziristan has prompted United States to target Haqqani bases and fighters with drone attacks.  The extremists fighting alongside the Taliban in Afghanistan have carried out some of the deadliest attacks on American-led allied forces in recent years.
 
The slain militant’s younger brother, Sirajuddin Haqqani, now heads the network founded by their father.

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Comments
     
by: Usman Ali from: Islamabad, Pak
November 11, 2013 2:28 PM
He was son of Haqqani but living peacefully in Pakistan, noting to do with war ...This incident show CIA and Black water are operating inside Pakistan under different cover like embassy staff and fake health ngos , Already there is high suspension about U.S. proxy war inside Pakistan and involvement in deliberately creating problems.


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
November 11, 2013 12:35 PM
Just as well to hear how freely terrorists walk about on the streets of Islamabad, justifying accusation Pakistan renders support to all sorts of terrorist networks. Al qaida, Haqqani network, taliban, etc. are all based in Pakistan enjoying safe haven. The US could not reach Osama bin Laden when all cooperation with Pakistan was the order of the day, until the US decided to keep the secret from Pakistan that she had found the most wanted terrorist. Reluctance to route out Taliban from Pakistan is simply a message that Pakistan is just playing games with USA, receiving aids and pay even the terrorists from it which they plough back into purchase of arms to fight the allied forces.

Pakistan's insistence on maintaining such obnoxious sharia laws of blasphemy, suppression of women and minorities is a sign the country is not willing to come out of its dungeon. It is because the US pays so much respect to the possession of weapons of mass destruction, like the nuke, that Pakistan has so far avoided being sanctioned. But a bolder administration under former president G.W. Bush rightly listed it as part of the axis and access of evil and terror. It will only be just if the US placed Pakistan where it rightly belongs: terror exporting countries. Its pretentious cooperation in the fight against terror is just to deceive and divert attention from its own nefarious terrorist activities. Pakistan is a terrorist country, period.

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