News / USA

US-Based Hong Kongers Pledge Support for Pro-Democracy Activists

Occupy Central protesters confront police in Hong Kong, Aug. 31, 2014.
Occupy Central protesters confront police in Hong Kong, Aug. 31, 2014.
Fang Bing

Hong Kong citizens living in New York are calling on Chinese living abroad to join them in opposing new election rules for their home territory.

At a press conference in New York late Monday, participants said they want to draw attention to what they say is a fight for true universal suffrage in Hong Kong.

Anna Yeung-Cheung, associate biology professor at Manhattanville College, said a number of Chinese living in North America have sent an open letter to the governments in Washington and Ottawa, asking them to urge Beijing to keep its promise of “one country, two systems."

“We can issue a statement to the members of parliament,” said Yeung-Cheung, “to let them pay attention to our concerns in Hong Kong and the real situation in Hong Kong.”

The event Monday brought together both young and old to state their support for full universal suffrage in Hong Kong.

Huang Yuzhen, the 95-year-old former chairman of the Chinese-American Lin Sing Association, says he is in favor of democracy and universal suffrage in Hong Kong.

“We want to strongly protest no universal suffrage," he said. "New York compatriots must send a strong voice."

The youngest attendee, Ao Zhuoxuan, grew up in Hong Kong and is currently studying at New York University. He rejected Beijing’s decision to control the nominating process.

“Those who fight for democracy are arguing for a democratic system in which Hong Kong people can vote for a chief executive whom they think is suitable,” he said. “This is not to say that we will certainly choose someone who is against Beijing."

Henry Ngan, a computer engineer from Hong Kong, said, “I hope that people can take time to express their support at the Chinese Consulate General in New York during the day Occupy Central happens.”

Activists in Hong Kong have vowed to move forward with their campaign and stage mass rallies to shut down the territory’s central business district. They have not given a date for the action.

On Sunday, Beijing angered many pro-democracy activists when it announced that it would tightly control nominations for Hong Kong’s chief executive.

This report was produced in collaboration with the VOA Mandarin service.

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Comments
     
by: Frankie Fook-lun Leung from: Los Angeles
September 03, 2014 11:38 AM
I love my country, does my country love me. Who is a patriot in China? Those in power tell you that you are. One day you are a patriot and the next day you are a counter-revolutionary. This kind of labeling is meaningless. Does the US constitution say for one to run for office, one has to be patriotic? No. Hong Kong people are smart. They do not trust the Chinese Communist Party, except those who are puppets and shoe-shine boys and girls.

In Response

by: thmak from: USA
September 03, 2014 2:26 PM
If you are not patriotic, you will not be nominated for any public office on a ballot in America. HKers demonstrated that they rejected the Occupy Central movement, indicating they support China..


by: thmak from: USA
September 03, 2014 9:41 AM
The protesters' demand of democratic open nomination, international standard and universal suffrage doesn't exist in any country anywhere. They are unrealistic and unreasonable. The main purpose of the protesters is to drag down HK's prosperity so as to achieve their selfish political gain and to give China a bad image. Their mission must be eliminated. Those protesters must be ashamed of themselves for not demanding their agenda when HK was under the democratic British colonial rule.

In Response

by: thmak from: USA
September 03, 2014 2:32 PM
To Frankie Fook-lun Leung: If HKer don't like HK, they can leave too just like what happened right after the turnover of HK to China. China just continue to prosper without them.

In Response

by: Frankie Fook-lun Leung from: Los Angeles
September 03, 2014 11:41 AM
When China had a Cultural Revolution, where did those Mainland people run to? Hong Kong. A lot of people in Hong Kong escaped from China or they are their children. They don't need you to tell them where they want to live, raise their children and have a better life. They know China and Hong Kong. Unfortunately, after 1997, Hong Kong becomes more and more like another Chinese city.


by: William Li from: Canada
September 02, 2014 8:44 PM
As an oversea Chinese I always support my motherland, and I am glad the communist did very good job recently for China! I want to tell my HK brothers, love your country love HK, stay away from those traitors and mobs, those are losers, they don't want to be Chinese, they go cry to their former master, what a shame! China doesn't need "democracy"! China needs development, security and unification

In Response

by: William Li from: Canada
September 04, 2014 12:53 AM
@hoang, why don't you go ask some Chinese their opinion about China? I guaranty you, most of us love China and we agree the communist is the best option for China so far! Communist is not perfect but we are happy with it as long as it can keep China stable and growing.
Thanks god China has communist and doesn't like Iraq, Egypt, Syria or Ukraine. Look what happened to those countries which surfer from orange revolution or arabe spring. Sorry no so called "democracy" for China please!

In Response

by: Hoang from: Canada
September 03, 2014 1:12 PM
In Canada, there are many parties. You are allowed to make bias comments. In China there is only the Communist Party. You are not allowed to make comments against the PRC. Rude name calling is only way Communist Chinese know how to debate.

In Response

by: william li from: canada
September 03, 2014 12:04 PM
@Hoang, the place I live has nothing to do with my political view. you should know that even in Canada there are many socialism and communism politic parties, isnt it? I can support communism but still live in Canada. it only shows your ignorant when you are speechless and rudely ask those who support their motherland to leave their recent host country. you are childish!

In Response

by: Frankie Fook-lun Leung from: Los Angeles
September 03, 2014 11:43 AM
Mr. Li should emigrate to North Korea. He will do very well there. You can love your country, kiss your leader 24 hours a day.

In Response

by: Hoang from: Canada
September 03, 2014 10:47 AM
If you love Communist China so much, what are you doing in Canada? You enjoy democracy living in Canada. Meanwhile you criticize western countries and democracy. This shows the hypocrisy in your comments.

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