News / Asia

Human Rights Watch Pushing for Int'l Contact Group on Tibet

Member of the Tibetan Parliament in exile Thubten Wangchen, left, together with another protestor hold the Tibetan flag during the 'Flame of Truth' rally, near the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, September 20, 2012.
Member of the Tibetan Parliament in exile Thubten Wangchen, left, together with another protestor hold the Tibetan flag during the 'Flame of Truth' rally, near the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, September 20, 2012.
VOA News
A top human rights group is urging the international community to form a contact group on Tibet in order to push the Chinese government to improve what it says is the "worsening human rights situation" there.

In a statement Friday, Human Rights Watch calls on world governments who are concerned about Tibet to discuss the formation of such a group on the sidelines of next week's United Nations General Assembly.

The New York-based organization says a contact group could pressure China to consider resuming "meaningful negotiations with Tibetan representatives." It also says such an initiative could demonstrate "heightened international concern" about Tibet.

About 50 Tibetans have set themselves on fire since 2009, mostly in protest against what they see as Chinese repression of their religion and culture - a charge Beijing denies. At least seven of the self-immolations occurred last month.

Human Rights Watch says that Beijing has responded to the growing number of self-immolations and protests with sweeping arrests and detentions. China has also strengthened the blackout on information coming from Tibetan areas.

China, which has the world's second largest economy, has put diplomatic pressure on international governments that publicly condemn its policies in Tibet. The country also discourages international forums from addressing the issue, saying it is an internal dispute regarding its own sovereignty.

But Sophie Richardson, the China director at Human Rights Watch says "concerned governments should set aside their fears of irking Beijing and press China to respect Tibetans' basic rights."

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Comments
     
by: Wangchuk from: NYC
September 27, 2012 10:34 AM
China refuses to talk about Tibet with other governments. So now other governments, including the US & the EU, must meet together & discuss how to improve the situation in Tibet. If China won't talk to the world about Tibet, than the rest of the world can meet on our own & figure out how to help the Tibetan people be free of CCP repression & colonialism.


by: Injustice
September 22, 2012 5:04 AM
Tibet is clearly a unique country with a unique culture with a totally different language and way of life,bearing no resemblance to Chinese.How could China succeed in force-assimilating the Tibetan population without resorting to false accusations,forced imprisonment,torture,rape and terrorising? As long as China is still a permanent member of the UN with strong political,economical and military influence,it would still carry on its policy of cultural eradition until all Tibetans,Xinjangese and Inner Mongolians lose their identities and become Chinese


by: juan from: guangzhou
September 22, 2012 3:09 AM
The issue of sovereignty can not be negotiated!Tibea,of course,is apart of China!

In Response

by: Western Democracy
September 28, 2012 3:40 PM
The way forward for China is to adopt Pro-Western Democracy like in Taiwan.Let the people voice their concerns and vote for the officials who could best represent their interests.Communist dictatorship only serves the interests of the ruling minority.The people are just the tools and the means for them implement their plans and are dispensable.The case of He Zhi Hua is one of too many that happens in China everyday.A pro-Western and law-abiding China would help improve peace,stability and prosperity to all mankind

In Response

by: chinese from: China
September 26, 2012 10:14 PM
Why would the tibetans keep expecting one day China will treat them better ? Just look at how the chinese government treat their own chinese citizens and one can get a pretty accurate expectation.

Case in point, He Zhi Hua of Changsha village just got crushed to death by the steam roller on the orders of a chinese government official a day ago .

In Response

by: Charlie from: UK
September 22, 2012 8:41 AM
China can not force its sovereignty on Tibet against the will of its people.Did the Ming Chinese like it when the Manchus invaded and annexed China into their Qing Dynasty? Of course not.To many Chinese,the adoption of the pigtails was an insult to their national pride,and many chose to die rather than wearing one.So respect their culture and aspirations.Nobody wants to live under foreign rule including Chinese themselves.Stop claiming everything is an indisputable part of China!

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