News / Middle East

    No Progress in Iran Nuclear Talks

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Yukiya Amano
    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Yukiya Amano
    VOA News
    Representatives from Iran and the U.N.'s nuclear watchdog have wrapped up another round of talks, with no agreement over access to a disputed nuclear site.  

    The two sides met Friday in Vienna to discuss access to Iran's Parchin facility, a military installation southeast of Tehran.  The West suspects the site is related to possible nuclear weapons development.

    After the talks, International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, chief inspector Herman Nackaerts told journalists the agency had hoped to resolve remaining differences.

    "Discussions today were intensive but important differences remained between Iran and the Agency that prevented an agreement," he said.

    Nackaerts said there were no immediate plans for another meeting.

    Meanwhile, Iranian envoy Ali Asghar Soltanieh said the two sides made headway.

    "We have to say that undoubtedly some progress in removing some ambiguities and differences has been made but still, as it was said, there are some differences because it is a very complex issue, and issues related to national security of a member state are something very delicate, but I have to say we are moving forward," Soltanieh said.

    The two sides have been in periodic negotiations for months over access to the Parchin site.

    The International Atomic Energy Agency says Parchin may have been a testing ground for the making of a nuclear warhead.

    News reports quoting comments from the IAEA in recent days express fears that Iran is ramping up its work on developing nuclear arms by installing new uranium enrichment centrifuges at another site, the Fordow underground facility.

    Iran says its nuclear ambitions are peaceful.

    The talks come as representatives of nearly 120 nations, including dozens of heads of state, are to convene in Tehran on Sunday for the summit of the Non-Aligned Movement.

    The Non-Aligned Movement is an organization formed during the Cold War to provide a forum for countries that were not officially allied with either the United States or the Soviet Union.

    The U.S. State Department says Iran will try to manipulate the Non-Aligned Movement at the summit and try to divert attention from its defiance of several U.N. Security Council resolutions and international sanctions over its disputed nuclear programs.

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    Comments
         
    by: gabe
    August 27, 2012 4:23 PM
    Jeremy Bernstein of the New Yorker wrote an interesting e-single on Iran's developing nuclear program. Bernstein is a physicist, but it is more of a history of how we ended up in this situation. Worth reading, for those interested: http://goo.gl/RvCmG

    by: Anonymous
    August 27, 2012 7:28 AM
    Trying to make progress with Iran is like talking to a brick wall. The government of Iran does not care about its own people. The people of Iran HATE their leaders, but can do nothing about it. I feel bad for the Iranians, very bad. The Iranian government is a disgrace to the world. If you didn't hear me I said the Iranian government is a disgrace to the world!

    by: jeanpierre from: usa
    August 26, 2012 10:59 PM
    FARAMARZ HOZOURI

    I am suggesting that President Obama clearly tell Iran that the US will use force to stop it from going nuclear instead of hinting it.

    This means that Iran gets a choice for a very short time then bombs away.

    by: JohnWV from: United States
    August 25, 2012 5:29 AM
    However did we get it all so backwards? As a signatory to the Non Proliferation Treaty, Iran has an internationally recognized right to develop and implement nuclear technology. Israel rejected the NPT and has no such right. Yet, the Jewish state has ICBM nukes and openly threatens Iran; actually campaigns for war against Iran. Israel, not Iran, should be sanctioned and forced to reveal its nuclear machinations to IAEA inspection. However did we get it all so backwards?

    by: JohnWV from: USA
    August 25, 2012 5:26 AM
    Iran is only Israel's current fixation. America's entire electoral system has been corrupted by Netanyahu's Israel, AIPAC, Israel Firsters and ingenious distribution of enormous amounts of Jewish money. Our representative democracy is nearly defeated and the destruction of America as we know it well underway. Termination of the criminal treachery and treason demands immediate priority. The Government of the United States must again serve American interests, not the Jewish state's relentless pursuit of invulnerability, territorial conquest and apartheid supremacist empire in, and beyond, the Mideast.

    by: Roy from: USA
    August 24, 2012 7:27 PM
    The sad reality is that few options if any short of military attack remain. Speaking as an American I have no desire to see our country become involved in what would doubtless become a widespread military conflict following such a strike. But Iran has repeatedly proved itself a rouge nation driven by religious fanatics unwilling to live in accordance with international norms. It has been in a technical state of war with the USA since the seizure of our embassy in 1979. It continues to initiate further acts of war, most recently the plot to assassinate the Saudi ambassador in Washington by blowing up a popular Georgetown restaurant he frequents. I often frequent that same restaurant so this affects me directly. Obama should have launched a cruise missile strike on Iranian Revolutionary Guard HQ in retaliation for that act of war but failed to do so, only further increasing Iran's belligerency. The time is at hand to stop them whatever the cost. Hitler should and easily could have been stopped before the Munich appeasement. Let us not make the same mistake again.
    In Response

    by: lizet from: USA
    August 25, 2012 2:54 AM
    Pure allegation. No base to any of your arguments. Influenced by media .what ever happened to the suspect in Saudi assassination?
    All lies, ALL ! Its up to the 70 million people in Iran to make decisions not you or Me . Iran is the power house of the region and the most stable.

    by: Godwin from: Nigeria
    August 24, 2012 1:24 PM
    Thus far the world, the West and all lovers of nuclear non-proliferation have wasted a lot of precious time and have achieved nothing. Having Iran drill the IAEA and decide when to allow people into the nuclear sites is a failed mission. It's a foolish approach so far that not enough force was applied to make Iran comply, and now to beg Iran to lower its enrichment program is conceding defeat. The US should not have involved itself in the first place, as its involvement has only provided Iran all the strategy it needed to swindle the world and become a nuclear power. Soon USA will go heart in lips, knees on the ground, begging Iran to use its nuclear power with restraint. The North Korean experience has taught you nothing. That time is by the corner, and the sissy US will reveal how jittery nuclear dream makes it. For, like it or not, Iran cannot attack Israel without simultaneously attacking USA even though Obama may look for a good reason to exonerate Tehran's action - because he'll have been out of office by then, and the usual gathering the mess for the Republicans to clean up routine will reappear like a recurring decimal. Like 9\11, it will be like Judgement Day when Iran strikes - on Doom's Day.
    In Response

    by: jean-pierre from: usa
    August 24, 2012 9:08 PM
    Now that talks with Iran have deadlocked again it is time for President Obama to change his ineffective policies vis-a-vis Iran.

    "All options are on the table" is not credible as a threat to Iran.

    Sending Panetta to Israel to convince Jerusalem that the US really means it also was not believed.

    If you can't say a simple sentence that you will meet an Iranian nuclear bomb with American military action, you also cannot ever engage in a major war with Iran.

    In Response

    by: FARAMARZ HOZOURI from: HOUSTON
    August 24, 2012 8:59 PM
    I still did not get your point. what are you suggesting?
    Should Iran allow IAEA to inspect it's Parchin site or not?
    Do you know if US or Israel will allow IAEA to inspect theirs?
    Iran's neighboring country,Pakistan is a nuclear one with Al-qaeda operating heavily there.

    Hoe come nobody is so concerned about it?

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