IAEA: Monitoring Iran Nuclear Deal Will Take Time

FILE - International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Yukiya Amano.
FILE - International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Yukiya Amano.
VOA News
The head of the U.N. nuclear agency says it will "take some time" for his organization to prepare to monitor a landmark nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers.

The agreement, signed Sunday in Geneva, calls for Iran to limit or freeze sensitive parts of its nuclear program for six months in return for limited relief from international sanctions. But no start date for the deal has been announced.

Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency will monitor Iran's compliance. IAEA chief Yukiya Amano said Thursday the U.N. agency needs some time to analyze the implications of the new duties on its funding and staffing. He made the remarks at a meeting of the IAEA's 35-nation board in Vienna.

World powers including the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council plus Germany pressed for the Geneva deal as a first step toward ensuring that Iran's nuclear activities have no military components. Iran says those activities are for peaceful civilian purposes, but Western powers suspect they are a cover for making bombs.

IAEA inspectors have been monitoring some of Iran's nuclear sites for years to ensure its compliance with international nonproliferation obligations. Diplomats in Vienna told Western news agencies the IAEA is unlikely to be ready for expanded monitoring of additional Iranian sites until January.

IAEA chief Amano also said Iran will permit inspections of a key facility at its Arak nuclear complex as part of separate agreement with the U.N. agency.

Amano said Tehran has invited the IAEA to inspect the Arak heavy water plant on December 8, in what will be the first such visit in two years. The nuclear plant produces heavy water intended for use in a nearby reactor that is under construction. IAEA inspectors have been able to access the reactor.

Iran and the IAEA agreed earlier this month to open the heavy water plant to inspections to enable the agency to carry out its long-standing mandate.

Iran later promised the six world powers in Geneva to refrain from making further advancements in the Arak complex for six months. Western powers fear Iran could use the reactor to produce plutonium for developing nuclear weapons.

Under the Geneva deal, Iran also promised to limit production of enriched uranium, another compound that can be used for nuclear bomb-making, when purified to a high level.

The agreement calls for Iran to stop enrichment above the 5 percent level and dilute its stockpile of uranium enriched to 20 percent, which is close to weapons-grade.

Iranian state news agency IRNA quoted Iran's nuclear chief Ali Akhbar Salehi as saying the country plans to increase its enrichment of low-level uranium. In a report published Thursday, Salehi said centrifuges previously producing 20 percent enriched uranium will be switched to producing uranium below the 5 percent level.
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Comment Sorting
by: Anonymous from: Nigeria
November 29, 2013 12:50 AM
For my observation, allowing Iran to have chemical weapon despite its limitation will pose danger in the middle east and the world in general . The Sunday Geneva pact marked the victory of Iran on its quest to have arsenal of chemical weapon. I do't know whether p5+1 have been compromise or not for reach such pact .
Finally, my position is that Iran should not have Iota of chemical weapon, because it is against international best practices

by: Change Iran Now from: USA
November 28, 2013 11:35 PM
Iran retains its full capacity to enrich uranium, thus abandoning a decade of Western insistence and Security Council resolutions that Iran stop all uranium-enrichment activities. Allowing Iran to continue enriching, and despite modest (indeed, utterly inadequate) measures to prevent it from increasing its enriched-uranium stockpiles and its overall nuclear infrastructure, lays the predicate for Iran fully enjoying its “right” to enrichment in any “final” agreement. Indeed, the interim agreement itself acknowledges that a “comprehensive solution” will “involve a mutually defined enrichment program.” This is not, as the Obama administration leaked before the deal became public; a “compromise” on Iran’s claimed “right” to enrichment. This is abject surrender by the United States.

by: Martin Bell from: USA
November 28, 2013 12:25 PM
well, i think we all knew that was bound to happen... soon we will find exactly what it means to have a mad fascist Iranian theocracy have an apocalyptic weapon. But look - we all knew that the Iranians lacked all credibility, and that their very nature necessitated deceit - to us, but certainly to their own appalling citizens... who are living such a squalid existence... and lack the courage to fight for their own freedoms from these corrupt Mullahs and other assorted clerics with their Basijis and Hizbullas and other fetid repressive terrorist groups. To tell you the truth, I don't know what is going on in my own country anymore... I know that Europe is disintegrating... Saudi Arabia is about to turn into a Lebanese version of hollow shell - and you can just see what the Iranian RGC and their Hizbulla and the Basijis are planing for the Sunni Arabs... a slaughter that will be fun to watch...
In Response

by: agil from: jakarta
November 28, 2013 3:02 PM
You have double standart, If USA allowed making nuclear bomb, why the others can't have same right. We all know only USA has used nuclear bomb in war. So who is the real terorist?
In Response

by: B. Panteleyev from: Russia
November 28, 2013 12:59 PM
Hey Martin, my American friend... you sound as if you are despairing...?? don't despair... we have Israel!!! you really think that they will allow Iran to undermine Saudi Arabia the way they did Lebanon or Iraq?? I think you are loosing faith... - you shouldn't... Iran will never have the bomb - they know they will be incinerated. nobody f** with Israel - NOBODY!!!

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