News / Asia

India, China to Resume Military Exercises

China's Defense Minister General Liang Guanglie shakes hands with his Indian counterpart A. K. Antony (3rd R) after their meeting in New Delhi, September 4, 2012.
China's Defense Minister General Liang Guanglie shakes hands with his Indian counterpart A. K. Antony (3rd R) after their meeting in New Delhi, September 4, 2012.
Anjana Pasricha
India and China will resume military exercises after a gap of four years. The announcement was made during a visit to New Delhi by the Chinese defense minister - the first such visit to India in eight years.

The decision to hold bilateral military exercises next year came during a meeting on Tuesday in the Indian capital.     

The two countries held military exercises in 2007 and 2008, but they were suspended when India froze defense exchanges with China following Beijing’s denial of a visa to an Indian general. 

But there has been a thaw recently. And the visit by Chinese Defense Minister Liang Guanglie is being seen as a bid to put defense ties back on track, as Beijing prepares for a change of leadership.

The two countries decided to hold high-level official exchanges and boost security cooperation between their navies.

Indian Defense Minister A.K. Antony says they had “heart-to-heart” discussions.  "We have discussed how to improve our relations in all spheres including the border areas,” he said.

The Indian minister says he will visit China next year.

Chinese minister Liang said in an interview to an Indian newspaper that Beijing is willing to work with New Delhi to maintain peace and tranquility in their border areas.

Although the relationship between the Asian giants has improved in recent years and trade is booming, mistrust continues to dog their ties.  

Talks spanning nearly two decades have failed to resolve a long-running border dispute which led to a brief war in 1962.

India’s recent moves to explore oil in the South China Sea have not gone down well with Beijing. And India is concerned about China building military infrastructure along their common frontier.

New Delhi is also deeply suspicious about what it views as efforts by China to “encircle India” by gaining influence and building infrastructure in neighboring countries such as Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bangladesh.

“China has a major interest in the Indian Ocean region and therefore, as a consequence of securing its own interest, its own commercial interest, trade etcetera,. it will have a presence in this region. Of course, this will concern India, concern others,” stated Dipankar Banerjee, Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies in New Delhi.

The Chinese defense minister sought to downplay Indian fears regarding its expanding influence in the Indian Ocean. Speaking in Sri Lanka before reaching India, he said that Beijing’s increasingly close ties with South Asia aim at ensuring “regional stability” and are not aimed at any third party.

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Comments
     
by: kannan mahathevan from: -
September 09, 2012 8:22 PM
At the end of the day, whatever the artificial Indian union tries to do to survive will be useless, as the so called Indian union can be compared to the European Union, though with much rigid undemocratic laws like the ban on speaking for secession and so on. It's with numerous difficulties this abomination has survived, depriving many smaller nations their inalienable right to choose their political destiny, either by force or by structural genocide. While this being the case with this setup, the Chinese civilization is a standalone entity that would do on it's own, come what may, with the single problem of communism and one party rule. Even the latte would fade away as time goes on and a new China will emerge like the one in Russia. So, the exercise, if it has any meaning, is just for the sake of China identifying loopholes in the other's system to utilise to disintegrate India. String of pearl will certainly strangulate!


by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
September 05, 2012 7:19 PM
Ian from USA, you are so stoopid. You just cant understand, can you? is that because you are brainwashed so completely and you cant think with your own brain? It is exactly because both China and USA are harmful to India, and India dare not to fight both of them at the same time, so India has to balance between China and USA.
It is very common in the geopolitics, such the relationships between, Russia, China and USA.China is using Russia to balance USA the same time watching out Russia for its greedy.
Ian, try to use your own brain more, refuse west media, will only do yourself good.


by: Ian from: USA
September 05, 2012 1:46 PM
To Jonathan Huang,

you say: 'Hoang from canada. I have to say you are so brainwashed ignorant. Are you blind? US and China are both allies of Pakistan, and Pakistan is the worst enemy of India. Indian sure want to use China to balance US."

-Who is blind to his own argument here? you say US & China are both allies of Pakistan ( who is India's enemy) so according to your statement, the conclusion should actually be neither the US nor China is good for India


by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
September 04, 2012 5:20 PM
Hoang from canada. I have to say you are so brainwashed ignorant. Are you blind? US and China are both allies of Pakistan, and Pakistan is the worst enemy of India. Indian sure want to use China to balance US. US is the biggest enemy of the whole world. And that is why most south east asian countries dont want to support Viets and Finos to against China, because they need China to protect their Economy and Safety.
Those countries benefit billions from the trade with China and how much you think they can revenue from those tiny islands?


by: ram iyer from: us/india
September 04, 2012 2:34 PM
India need to balance both US and China. 1962 china-india miniwar and 1971 US sent 7th fleet to threat India and called Indian Prime Minister as a bitch.

US is doing lots of soap operas to fool Indians while Chinese are feeling that Indians are kind of in dreams with the new american paramour.

But reality check is necessary



by: Hoang from: Canad
September 04, 2012 2:06 PM
Nikos, from U.S.,
why are you living in the U.S.?
China is a threat to both U.S. and India.


by: Nikos Retsos from: Chicago, USA
September 04, 2012 9:19 AM
Withe the U.S. asserting its influence in the Pacific, China and India -traditionally rivals- have no choice but to unite and present a united front to the U.S. in the South China Sea and the Indian Ocean. If they it alone, they don't stand any chance of thwarting the U.S. plans of supremacy.
If there was a case where "national interests politics make for strange bedfellows," this is it! Surely, the traditional hostility between China and India will keep simmering in the background, but given the danger they see upfront now with the U.S. assertiveness in their backyards, they know that they need to bury the hatchet or lose their sea and oceanic territorial control to a bold outside power. In other words, they are willing now to share the loaf among themselves, rather than lose it! Nikos Retsos, retired professor

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