News / Asia

India Gang-Rape Victim Undergoing Treatment in Singapore

An ambulance is parked outside the Mount Elizabeth Hospital in Singapore, December 27, 2012.
An ambulance is parked outside the Mount Elizabeth Hospital in Singapore, December 27, 2012.
VOA News
An Indian woman who was the victim of a gang rape and brutal beating earlier this month in New Delhi has been flown to Singapore for further treatment, while the Indian prime minister is pledging to focus on the issue of women's safety.

The CEO of Singapore's Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Dr. Kelvin Loh, said the 23-year-old victim arrived at the facility early Thursday in "extremely critical condition." He said "prior to her arrival, she has already undergone three abdominal surgeries and experienced a cardiac arrest in India."

Earlier in the day, B.D. Athani, medical superintendent at the Indian hospital where she had been treated, said the hospital in Singapore has an advanced multi-organ transplant facility and that arrangements have been made for the woman's family to accompany her there.

"Based on the advice of a team of doctors, the government of India has made arrangements that the patient be shifted in a well-equipped air ambulance to a renowned hospital identified by the doctors, involving minimum journey so that she can be provided with state-of-art medical treatment that may perhaps stretch to many weeks," said Athani.

Indian Home Minister Sushilkumar Shinde said in a statement that "despite the best efforts of our doctors, the victim continues to be critical and her fluctuating health remains a big cause of concern for all of us."

What happened

The woman was traveling on a charter bus on December 16 when a group of men on board raped and beat her with an iron rod and then threw her from the bus.

Police have arrested six alleged attackers, who are accused of rape and attempted murder.

Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh told a development conference Thursday that attacks against women happen "in all states and regions" and require greater attention from national and local officials.

"The safety and security of women is of the highest concern to our government," said the prime minister. "A commission of inquiry is being set up to look into precisely these issues in the capital."

Singh said India cannot have meaningful development without the active participation of women, and that their security must be assured.

Investigation

The government on Wednesday announced a commission that will review police response to the attack, while another panel is tasked with suggesting ways to make the capital safer for women as well as changes to the law to create stiffer penalties for such crimes.

In a new measure aimed at combating violence against women, India's junior home minister Ratanjit Singh said the names and photos of convicted rapists will be posted on a ministry website to publicly shame them.
 
The gang rape has sparked days of widespread protests in New Delhi urging the government to address crimes against women. On Thursday, hundreds of demonstrators tried to march to government buildings in the capital but were stopped by riot police armed with tear gas and water cannons.

Public criticism

Meanwhile, Indian President Pranab Mukherjee's son, Abhijit, was sharply criticized Thursday for saying the protesters were not students but "dented and painted" women who wear heavy makeup and think it is fashionable to protest. He said the demonstrations "must be part of some hidden agenda of some political party."

Mukherjee later apologized after activists, political leaders and his sister came out against his remarks.

Some information for this report was provided by AP.

  • An Indian protester shouts slogans as he is stopped by police during a protest against a recent gang-rape of a young woman in a moving bus in New Delhi, India, December 27, 2012.
  • Indians protesting the recent gang-rape of a young woman in a moving bus in New Delhi, display a poster calling for death penalty for offenders at a rally in Kolkata, December 27, 2012.
  • Police stand near barricades as they prepare to stop protesters on their way to India Gate while demonstrating against the gang-rape of a young woman in a moving bus in New Delhi, India, December 27, 2012.
  • People participate in a candle light vigil for the recovery of the young victim of the recent brutal gang-rape in a bus in New Delhi, India, December 26, 2012.
  • A woman is removed by Indian police while protesting against the brutal gang-rape of a woman on a moving bus in New Delhi, India, December 25, 2012.
  • Police and relatives carry the body of Subhash Tomar, a police man, during his funeral in New Delhi, December 25, 2012. Tomar died after he was injured during a protest over a gang rape in New Delhi.
  • Members of the All India Democratic Students Organization (DSO) hold placards and shout slogans condemning the brutal gang rape of a woman on a moving bus in New Delhi during a protest in Ahmadabad, India, December 24, 2012.
  • Indian police use water cannons to push back protesters during a demonstration near the India Gate against the gang rape and brutal beating of a 23-year-old student on a bus last week, in New Delhi, India, December 23, 2012.
  • An Indian man overwhelmed by tear gas lies on the ground during a protest in New Delhi, India, December 23, 2012.
  • A demonstrator holds a placard in front of India Gate as she takes part in a protest rally organized by various women's organisations in New Delhi, India, December 21, 2012.
  • People participate in a candlelight vigil for the fast recovery of a young woman as she fights for her life at a hospital after being brutally raped and tortured, in New Delhi, India, December 21, 2012.

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Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
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by: Peet from: US
December 27, 2012 12:23 PM
One night a female dog was walking on a dark street, she came across 6 male dogs, she was frightened to death. The dogs said, don't worry dear, we wont hurt you. Moral of the story: Dogs are better than these 6 men who raped. May god never let these 6 people and all other rapists live peacefully, let them rot in earth and then go to hell.

by: sary from: newyork
December 27, 2012 12:10 PM
So there are no good hospitals in India
In Response

by: Rupinder Mahal
December 27, 2012 11:11 PM
Yes, the team of experts said government of India didn't ask them that question but only if patient was fit for air transport before making that decision.

Possibly to keep the parents of the victim quiet as they had been speaking to the media in India and protesters are taking to the streets. India government also said "privacy" is well respected by Singapore.
In Response

by: Azita from: London
December 27, 2012 5:41 PM
Hospitals around the world have various specialists. No one hospital has all the specialists. A highly specialised team and equipment are required. In the UK and around the world many children travel to Great Ormand Street Hospital in London just for that specialist team of doctors and health professionals and equipment. So any one who has a complaint against the hard work of such professionals and teachers I would advise them to take the courageous step to step into one of these or similar professions

by: Caroline from: New Jersey USA
December 27, 2012 12:10 PM
Forgive the men who did this by placing them in a jail for the rest of their lives so that they may find the true meaning of prison gang rape themselves!!!! Pain is what makes people find God.

by: arthur p. kaske from: Missoula, Montana, USA
December 27, 2012 11:29 AM
There should be "NO TOLERANCE" for rape in this world. Death, to those who grant themselves this act, is not beyond reason.

by: Greg from: Charles
December 27, 2012 11:18 AM
This is only in the news because she survived her attack.
In Response

by: Marion from: Australia
December 27, 2012 9:12 PM
Yes she did survive and now other women in her country are standing up to fight. People around the World have also heard the rape statistics which were not publicised before this and are also standing up. I am in another country and I would happily stand beside those protesters being sprayed by police. Women should be allowed to walk alone- like our own Jill Meagher (may she rest in peace).

by: T.Bates from: UK
December 27, 2012 10:35 AM
Personally speaking I think castration and hard labour is in order for all assailants in this horific attack on this young lady.

Let the punishment fit the crime. This lady must have been terrified out of her life and I think that all she will want to do when she finally recovers is die.

Do these animals who did this not have sisters of there own who could one day suffer the same crime. If they have sisters and the same should happen to them,they will be the first to scream and shout for the blood of any perpetrators involved.

I am sorry ,castrate them with a life sentence on top. Human rights for the perpetrators does not enter into this discussion.
In Response

by: Paris tun from: Burma
December 28, 2012 8:02 AM
Agree with you, T. Bates. Those animals are not simply depressed or people with "needs". In other words, they did that to those poor woman not because they have" needs," but because they are sick and inhumane enough to do that kind of crime.
Stop treating those sick animals as humane people! and Don't put us in the same category with those animals! So, extraordinary punishment should be, in place for those extraordinarily cruel animals. Those sick species definitely LAUGHED AT life imprisonment. Castration will deter those sex maniacs to a certain extent because the punishment is targeting the main source of evil which is their unregulated sex organs, to which those sex maniac worship.
Of course, love has the ability solve every problem but those animals were not searching for love or wisdom. Know what I mean?
In Response

by: Hugh Grant from: California, U.S.A.
December 28, 2012 12:23 AM
To T. Bates, U.K.: You are 100 % right. Castration for these cowards is quite appropriate.
In Response

by: Marion from: Australia
December 27, 2012 9:17 PM
The perpetrators thought they would get away with it because that's the tradition in their country. Men are "worth" more than women, families sell their girls into prostitution for animals in exchange. It's time they have a wakeup call. She may go through moments of wanting to die, but she's a fighter and she has a dream to be a doctor. She'll get there and hopefully she gets out of India if men there think she is worth less because she isn't "perfect" anymore.
In Response

by: Peter Swinson
December 27, 2012 6:29 PM
Jeff - Were if my family member I would beget a good bit more violence than the rapist would be able to enjoy.
In Response

by: JeffH from: US
December 27, 2012 12:43 PM
You are the very reason humanity sucks so badly. Violent begets violence? Your sadistic fantasies of how to punish the "wicked" are the reason violence is perpetuated and gets out of control.

by: Deborah from: Britain
December 27, 2012 10:02 AM
Good to se the Indians coming out against these heinous crimes. The most severest of punishments must be meted out to those who think they can violate other women.

by: Murderers
December 27, 2012 6:33 AM
If her life is saved, its hard to imagine if it will be better than death for her.

Punishment of death for all the rapists.

May Allah protect women from these animals. Ameen.
In Response

by: Empathy
December 28, 2012 3:47 AM
In reply to Sean:
Atheists like u, r the biggest 'morons' the world has ever witnessed. People are talking about this article and u r making their empathy seem worthless in front of ur so called idiotic mind.
In Response

by: Ex from: USA
December 27, 2012 11:30 AM
Much love... What is the greater sin??? Everyone dies, but few live eternity with the horror she was forced to suffer... Death is an easy out for them... Take their balls, hands, feet and eyes... Feed them their hands, balls feet and eyes... THEN... Let them starve.
In Response

by: Sean from: Toronto
December 27, 2012 11:20 AM
Pey and Blok,e your responses have little to do with what Murderers said and almost entirely to do with your own very creative interpretations. He called the men animals - I think that generally speaking (I hope) humans show a greater regard for others than animals do. What's more, Murderers observed that dying might be an easier way out than life for the young lady. I have no idea what route is better for her, but I understood this comment to be full of empathy and so your responses are quite unreasonable. Lastly I myself am an atheist who believes many of the world's ills radiate from religion, but I think using terms like 'Islamic moron' helps to create mistrust and hatred between Eastern and Western people. Its all the more wrong when Murderers is fairly clear in expressing concern for the young woman.

Shame on you both.
In Response

by: Pey_Parisi
December 27, 2012 10:23 AM
You are misguided on so many issues. May Allah protect her? If there was an Allah why did this happen in the first place? Who are you to assume her life won't be worth living if she survives? Are you not already judging her? And, why would you refer to the heinous perpetrators as "animals". Non-human animals would never do this -- only human animals do this type of evil act. WAKE UP! Educate yourself.
In Response

by: Empathy from: USA
December 27, 2012 9:24 AM
The attackers should know the pain and fear the poor girl went thru - and the whole world should know what happened to them - so that others will fear to go that route....

This 23 yr is just a drop in an ocean of many other women who went thru this ordeal -- for all them -- this new change should bring a new effect in the society.
Comments page of 2
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