News / Asia

India, Pakistan Hold Talks on Mumbai Attacks

Indian Foreign Secretary Ranjan Mathai (R) shakes hands with his Pakistani counterpart Jalil Abbas Jilani during a photo opportunity in New Delhi, July 4, 2012. Indian Foreign Secretary Ranjan Mathai (R) shakes hands with his Pakistani counterpart Jalil Abbas Jilani during a photo opportunity in New Delhi, July 4, 2012.
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Indian Foreign Secretary Ranjan Mathai (R) shakes hands with his Pakistani counterpart Jalil Abbas Jilani during a photo opportunity in New Delhi, July 4, 2012.
Indian Foreign Secretary Ranjan Mathai (R) shakes hands with his Pakistani counterpart Jalil Abbas Jilani during a photo opportunity in New Delhi, July 4, 2012.
Anjana Pasricha
NEW DELHI — India has made fresh accusations of Pakistani state support of the 2008 terror attacks that devastated India's financial hub, Mumbai, dampening Wednesday peace talks in New Delhi.

As top diplomats from India and Pakistan met in the Indian capital, India’s Home Minister P. Chidambaram renewed allegations that “people clearly describable as state actors” were present in a control room in the Pakistani city of Karachi from where he says the deadly strike was coordinated.

“So I think the dots are being connected, it is no longer possible for anyone to deny that the incident happened in Mumbai, but the control of the incident before and during the incident was in Pakistan,” he said.

Indian officials say they have gathered the evidence from a man who they describe as the handler of the ten terrorists who mounted the multiple assaults on luxury hotels and other targets in Mumbai, killing 166 people. He was arrested last month after being deported by Saudi Arabia.

India now has more details of exactly how the attack was launched, said Chidambaram.

“We now know where they were trained, who trained them, who briefed them, we now know who was in the control room, we now know how the control room functioned.”

The home minister's allegations took center stage during talks between Indian Foreign Secretary Ranjan Mitthai and his Pakistani counterpart, Jalil Abbas Jilani, designed to move the fragile peace process forward.

Observers say India has demanded more action from Pakistan against those responsible for the Mumbai attacks, including the founder of Laskhar-e-Taiba, Hafiz Saeed, who New Delhi accuses of masterminding the strike. India says it has furnished new evidence to back its allegations.

But Pakistan has repeatedly denied any role in the attacks.

While the issue of terror continues to trouble relations between the two countries, officials also discussed how to move ahead with less contentious issues such as liberalizing trade.

Observers say they do not expect substantive progress at the discussions, but say they will help in ensuring that the peace dialogue between the archrivals stays on track.  The two sides are scheduled to meet on Thursday.

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Comments
     
by: Ashim Chatterjee from: Delhi
July 05, 2012 3:54 AM
Given the standing of political class in both India and Pakistan, which are suffering from trust deficit among their respective peoples, if resolution of Indo-Pak matters don't help them to get any political advantage in domestic politics, no amount of resolve to carry forward the dialogue at even the highest government level won't bring these countries any closer to solution of issues. Gone are the days and gone are the leaders in both countries to get popular and political acceptability on any agreement. It is important to remember that leadership of both countries have stake of undesirable nature in dialogues. They engage in dialogues to divert attention of people from embarrassing domestic issues, to gain some political mileage. Their interests in dialogues are narrow and self-centered. This is however not to say that resolution of Indo-Pak issues is impossible.

One's sense dialogues must take place among big business of both countries and leaders of trade with transcontinental corporations in loop for they have the more positive stake in the matter than representatives of both governments, who should act as no more than clerks. Business, trade and people at large in both countries must first taste the fruits of economic integration of their economies to see in proper perspective the non-sense of Indo-Pak rivalry and animosity over Kashmir and then push their governments for even unification of South Asia that can benefit the world in creation of a strategic balance in Asia economically and millitarily.


by: Kamran Ali from: Pakistan
July 05, 2012 3:18 AM
Dear Sandip , with all respect , i would humbly implore you to go through the Pak- Indian history. who started poking in neighbor , Indira Gandhi's doctrine, Mukti Bahini, eventually a weaker side will resort to similar tactics to guarantee security of it's territory . I'm glad to see two countries coming back to tables, but India now should cease to be stubborn over issues which will not lead us to any broad way to prosperous future of region.


by: Kamran Ali from: Pakistan
July 04, 2012 8:49 AM
A respite for the nations across the border , hope there will be no more escalation in relations in coming years. But, India ,when she blames Pakistan for terrorist activities in her territories , then who is behind the insurgency in Balochistan and support to Tehrik e Taliban Pakistan ?

In Response

by: Just from: Dayton, OH, USA
July 05, 2012 8:00 AM
Brother Kamran, you missed the point, Al Qaida, Taliban, Laskar-e-Taiba, and other are not product of India, rather they have been initiated by those with mindset who believe that their religion and killing of non-believers are the only solution to all problems.

All religions are farse - there is no God. If we believe in God then we should also believe that we all are God no matter how insignificant role we play our in the creation of this universe.

In Response

by: Sandip Jadhav from: USA-An Indian
July 04, 2012 11:24 AM
Kamran,
India had not send Terrorist to kill innocent people.. Your 10 guys came in India and killed innocent people.
It's Pakistan Tradition refusing to any act in Terrorism... Whole world know that you have " IIT' an International School of Terrorism.

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