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Indian Police Round Up Tibetan Exiles Before Hu Visit

Indian police detain a Tibetan exile participating in an illegal protest against the visit of Chinese President Hu Jintao in New Delhi, India, March 28, 2012.
Indian police detain a Tibetan exile participating in an illegal protest against the visit of Chinese President Hu Jintao in New Delhi, India, March 28, 2012.

Police in New Delhi are cracking down on the city’s Tibetan population, after a Tibetan exile set himself on fire this week to protest a visit by Chinese President Hu Jintao.

Media reports say hundreds of Tibetan activists were detained or confined to their homes Tuesday as part of “preventative measures” aimed at stopping another self-immolation bid.

The Hindustan Times says police have ordered all Tibetans under house arrest until March 31, since many have disregarded a government ban on protests.

As President Hu arrived Wednesday, police hauled groups of angry anti-China activists away from a banned protest near India’s parliament.  President Hu is in India for a summit meeting of the so-called BRICS nations - Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. 

Prominent Tibetan writer and activist Tenzin Tsundue was arrested while he was giving a speech at an academic seminar on India and Tibet.  Hundreds of students at a youth hostel in New Delhi say they were prevented from leaving the facility to take their college exams.

The crackdown comes after 27-year-old Tibetan exile Jamphel Yeshi set himself on fire Monday during an anti-Chinese protest.  He was taken to a hospital with burns over 98 percent of his body.  Activists said Wednesday that Yeshi died from his wounds.

This is the second self-immolation by a Tibetan exile in New Delhi in recent months.  Tibetan rights groups say 29 Tibetans have set themselves on fire in regions under Chinese control.  Yeshi is thought to be the first Tibetan to die in India of self-immolation.

China refers to the self-immolators as terrorists who are carefully coordinated by "trained separatists."

Tibetans accuse China of pursuing a policy of deliberate cultural extinction in Tibetan-inhabited areas.  Images of the Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, are forbidden.  Monks and nuns are forced to undergo patriotic “re-education” programs.  And Beijing floods the areas with non-Tibetan economic migrants who are accused of discriminating against the local population.

China says Tibet has always been part of its territory.  Tibetans say the Himalayan region was virtually independent for centuries.

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by: Wangchuk
April 03, 2012 6:46 AM
It's truly shameful Delhi police are kowtowing to China & denying free speech to Tibetans. Their actions violate Indian Constitution & int'l law. India should not fear China but stand up to her & support Tibetan freedom.

by: abdula
March 29, 2012 2:51 AM
Chinese Govt has employed and spent money for hundred of thousands of their people to make a comment on news articles. This is the victory for world that Chinese govt is afraid of Media. this is good news. Tibetan will be fight forever. Chinese has to bow down. Chinese are coward. 1tibetan is enough for 15 Chinese.

by: Dalai Dayak
March 29, 2012 12:37 AM
China will never be a truly great power until it reclaims all of its lost territories. If not for Deng Xiao Ping, Hong Kong would still be under British control. Macao would still be under Portuguese control. Arunal Pradesh was never part of India until the Brits grabbed it from a weak Ching empire and made it part of India. Mongolia will have to revert to Chinese rule. The list goes on.

by: Xing
March 28, 2012 10:44 PM
@vkmo: If you respect history, please check it and you should know they are different in nature. If you fabricate histrory, you should not be respected.

by: lvhexin
March 28, 2012 10:07 PM
I suggest peoples here that suport tibet indepedence should study history more harder before kyoodling here

by: fy
March 28, 2012 8:20 PM
vkmo, don't you know the history of native Americans?

by: Matt Chibi
March 28, 2012 6:20 PM
India is sending the wrong signal. Instead of profiling every Tibetan as a potential self-immolation perpetrator, India should be restraining Hu Jintao, not innocent people standing against oppression!

by: jim
March 28, 2012 10:39 AM
Tibetan is one part of china, which china goverment give larg sums of money and a lot of usefull things to help them escape from poverty, and respect them culture, the probelm is that there are a little upriseing-exiled activists always try to make use of the culture conflict to meet them ambition to be a king without the care of people's life.

by: vkmo
March 28, 2012 9:57 AM
Tibet and Norway are alike because Norway was attacked and occupied by Nazis under Hitler during WWII from 1940 and 1945, while communist red china under guerrilla leader mao-dze-dung attacked Tibet and occupied Tibet, except that this occupation has continued for over 60 years to Norway's 5 years.

by: Cam
March 28, 2012 6:44 AM
Tibetan people want freedom; China will never be a great and lasting world power until the Tibetan people and Tibetan Buddhism are free from China’s precaution. Long life to The Dalai Lama and HH The Karmapa.
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