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Indian Police Round Up Tibetan Exiles Before Hu Visit

Indian police detain a Tibetan exile participating in an illegal protest against the visit of Chinese President Hu Jintao in New Delhi, India, March 28, 2012.
Indian police detain a Tibetan exile participating in an illegal protest against the visit of Chinese President Hu Jintao in New Delhi, India, March 28, 2012.

Police in New Delhi are cracking down on the city’s Tibetan population, after a Tibetan exile set himself on fire this week to protest a visit by Chinese President Hu Jintao.

Media reports say hundreds of Tibetan activists were detained or confined to their homes Tuesday as part of “preventative measures” aimed at stopping another self-immolation bid.

The Hindustan Times says police have ordered all Tibetans under house arrest until March 31, since many have disregarded a government ban on protests.

As President Hu arrived Wednesday, police hauled groups of angry anti-China activists away from a banned protest near India’s parliament.  President Hu is in India for a summit meeting of the so-called BRICS nations - Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. 

Prominent Tibetan writer and activist Tenzin Tsundue was arrested while he was giving a speech at an academic seminar on India and Tibet.  Hundreds of students at a youth hostel in New Delhi say they were prevented from leaving the facility to take their college exams.

The crackdown comes after 27-year-old Tibetan exile Jamphel Yeshi set himself on fire Monday during an anti-Chinese protest.  He was taken to a hospital with burns over 98 percent of his body.  Activists said Wednesday that Yeshi died from his wounds.

This is the second self-immolation by a Tibetan exile in New Delhi in recent months.  Tibetan rights groups say 29 Tibetans have set themselves on fire in regions under Chinese control.  Yeshi is thought to be the first Tibetan to die in India of self-immolation.

China refers to the self-immolators as terrorists who are carefully coordinated by "trained separatists."

Tibetans accuse China of pursuing a policy of deliberate cultural extinction in Tibetan-inhabited areas.  Images of the Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, are forbidden.  Monks and nuns are forced to undergo patriotic “re-education” programs.  And Beijing floods the areas with non-Tibetan economic migrants who are accused of discriminating against the local population.

China says Tibet has always been part of its territory.  Tibetans say the Himalayan region was virtually independent for centuries.

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by: Xenlightened
March 28, 2012 6:41 AM
China should just grant Tibet its autonomy. They would gain immeasurable merit with the Western World and many other countries as well. I mean there is no real reason for them to keep Tibet locked down under their thumb. Its a completely separate culture with a long tradition. They (Chinese Government) should not fear religious infiltration of China.


by: Victor Nunnally
March 28, 2012 5:47 AM
Dear God, please feel their pain and help these people. Destroy the Dragon with your light. Amen.

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