News / Asia

Indian Rape Victim Dies in Singapore Hospital

Demonstrators hold placards as they take part in a protest rally in solidarity with a rape victim from New Delhi in Mumbai, December 27, 2012.
Demonstrators hold placards as they take part in a protest rally in solidarity with a rape victim from New Delhi in Mumbai, December 27, 2012.
VOA News
The Indian student who was brutally gang-raped on a bus in New Delhi has died in a Singapore hospital.

A statement from the Mount Elizabeth Hospital said the 23-year-old "died peacefully" early Saturday.

The hospital CEO, Dr. Kelvin Loh, said the doctors had fought "for her life including putting her on maximum artificial ventilation support, optimal antibiotic doses as well as stimulants which maximize her body's capability to fight infections." The unnamed victim's family members were by her side.

The woman was traveling with a male companion on a charter bus in the Indian capital December 16, when a group of men on board beat them both with an iron rod, raped her and then threw them from the bus.

Police arrested six alleged attackers, who are accused of rape and attempted murder.

The woman was airlifted to Singapore from a New Delhi hospital on Wednesday, a move that drew criticism from medical experts in India.

Dr. Samiran Nundy, chairman of the organ transplant and gastro-surgery department of Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, told The Hindu the transfer of the critically-ill woman from an Indian hospital where she received good care made little sense and seemed more of a political move.

Medical experts who were consulted by the government before the woman's transfer told the Indian newspaper that they were only asked if it was safe to move the victim, not if it was medically advisable.

A member of the Indian team who cared for her, Dr. Mahesh Chandra Misra with All India Institute of Medical Sciences, told The New York Times that the woman's injuries were severe and that she was "practically dead" when she was brought into Safdarjung Hospital in New Delhi.

Meanwhile, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh spoke out on the case again Friday, saying he and the leader of the ruling Congress Party, Sonia Gandhi, "share the anguish and anger of the country over this heinous crime."  He also said the government is "committed to bringing the guilty to justice as soon as possible."

The government on Wednesday announced a commission that will review police response to the attack, while another panel is tasked with suggesting ways to make the capital safer for women as well as changes to the law to create stiffer penalties for such crimes.

In northern India, officials say a 17-year-old Indian girl from Punjab state who was gang raped in November has killed herself after police pressured her to drop the case and marry one of her attackers.

Before her death Wednesday, there had been no arrests in her case.  Officials say three people were arrested on Thursday.

Some information for this report provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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by: Glenn from: Sydney, Australia
December 29, 2012 5:17 PM
Does anyone know what happened to the her companion? I read he was beaten and thrown of naked as well but survived.

by: CX from: Malaysia
December 29, 2012 7:48 AM
My deepest condolences go to her family. I believe that, now, the best that all of us could do is strongly oppose violence against women, and offer help any way we can to a person we know who is suffering physically or emotionally.
It is so sad to know that people only take actions when something bad like this happens.

by: Muhammad from: Iran
December 29, 2012 4:43 AM
Oh my! I'm so profoundly sad and feel ashamed of being human to live is such societies. It’s one of the features of the third world countries. This inhuman phenomena is widely seen in the third world countries, but mostly are hidden and covered by the mass medias. Even in some countries in jails, people are raped officially. I have nothing to talk about it. I’m so sorry.

by: scout from: USA
December 29, 2012 1:41 AM
The men who brutally raped and beat this young woman are most likely sadistic sociopaths. Sadistic sociopaths enjoy seeing and causing pain and terror in others. 5% of the human population are sadistic sociopaths and 99% of serial killers are also. Many of these individuals torture and kill animals prior to their crimes against humans.

by: Raghavendra from: india
December 29, 2012 1:09 AM
I and most of us accept, all these kind happening because idiot indians following western culture.. i feel porn is also a great impact on those people who are psycho's..
In Response

by: rest in peace from: Canada
December 31, 2012 12:39 PM
i harly believe that any "accepts" your ignorant belief. pointing the finger at someone else's society does not show accountability for the cultural norms of your own.
In Response

by: Lisa from: CA
December 29, 2012 8:14 PM
I doubt anyone accepts what you say. This doesn't happen in Western culture. It seems to be a common occurence in India although this was beyond barbaric. Don't look at other cultures for what is happening in yours.

by: Steve from: Missouri
December 28, 2012 6:35 PM
This wouldn't even happen in a barnyard.
Evil has come to India.
They will need to deal with it or it will be the end of their country.
In Response

by: utpal from: kolkata
December 29, 2012 1:25 AM
lowest per-capita law enforcers/implementers, longest written (copy/paste)constitution- largest no. of acts and rules.Hope things improve- since people think it should...
In Response

by: Raghavendra from: India
December 29, 2012 1:07 AM
actuall all are taking this in wrong way
our democratic country itself but has to understand % crime rate.
we are trying to reduce the crimerate to zero for sure in future.
every home has bad guys, every country has bad guys its not right to blame a country and its culture for a person or a group of person's.

every one should stop blame and just pray for her soul and wellness of society, before showing finger on india think rest finger showing yourself.

we definitely punish them without showing mercy on them

by: MuckrakerW from: Ohio
December 28, 2012 5:04 PM
American women in the 1960s put up the same fight against rape during those years. Crime in big cities at the time was analogous to a Rocky horror show. Moreover in comparison as cops in India look the other way, often American cops did much the same thing, until women in the U.S. banded together and lobbied for change in Washington. Now sex offenders must register where they reside. Moreover their name and criminal background is put in a database for public availability.

Australia, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Norway, and United States, all have national sex offender programs. According to Title 1 of the Adam Walsh Act of 2006, a federal mandate requires all U.S. jurisdictions to update their sex offender registration laws to conform with federal guidelines. (Wikipedia: Sex Offender Registration: Legal Authority)

India has a lot of work to do in government to catch up with the aforementioned countries which have in place strong legislation in their respective nations to protect women as well as in America from sex predators today in 2012. This fight will take all Indian women and their loved ones to do battle in parliament to make the necessary changes that will to some degree assure their safety when ever they are on the go alone whether day or night.
In Response

by: judejep
December 29, 2012 2:23 PM
And as an incentive to getting the work done, nobody should travel to these God forsaken countries! When they lose their tourist incomes, they will be sure to comply with the rest of the civilized world. Unfortunately it will take a lot of time to change attitudes to women.

by: Anonymous
December 28, 2012 3:25 PM
Very sad news, prayers to her and her family.

by: Romildo Caldas from: Brazil
December 28, 2012 2:45 PM
It is a matter of Education Background, Certainly, these Rapists had not a Sound Discipline, based in ethics and Religious Principles. Surely they have to be Punished and put behind bars.

by: Tom from: Canada
December 28, 2012 1:29 PM
oh, this happend in the biggest demoncracy, what a shame! Indian are so proud of their Demoncracy, and a girl was raped to death on a bus and threw out of the moving bus, my GOD! what the driver doing? can't call police? I guess it no use to call police since they are so discorrupted too.
In Response

by: Rick from: Mexico
December 28, 2012 5:26 PM
What happened to her male friend?

is he alive?
In Response

by: Vignesh from: India
December 28, 2012 2:23 PM
The bus driver was the rapist. The bus driver and his accomplices (6 in total), picked a fight with the girl's male friend, hit him in the head and proceeded to rape her. The bus is not a public transport bus, but a private bus unauthorized to carry public passengers, which the girl and her friend mistakenly boarded (partly due to one of the rapist, telling them to do so offering them a ride). The bus was driven out of highly populated area and the windows too were tinted. No one else but the rapists were inside of the bus.
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