World News

Indian Supreme Court Upholds Anti-Gay Law

India's Supreme Court has upheld a 19th-century law making homosexual acts a crime, overturning an earlier court decision.

The court ruled Wednesday that a 2009 High Court decision to strike down the law was unconstitutional. It said that decision should be made by Indian lawmakers, not the legal system.

The ruling was a blow to gay rights advocates, who largely expected the 2009 ruling to be upheld. Activists outside the courtroom told reporters the law allows police harassment of gay couples and vowed to continue to fight it.

The 2009 court decision said a law against people engaging in "carnal acts against the order of nature" infringed on Indians' fundamental rights. The law makes such acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

After the 2009 ruling against the law, conservative religious groups criticized the move and demanded the law be upheld.

Featured Story

Pakistan's Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, right, receives Afghan President Ashraf Ghani at the prime minister house in Islamabad, Pakistan, Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014.

New Signs of Optimism for Afghan-Pakistan Relations

In Pakistan, civilian and military leaders appear to be focused on convincing local and foreign critics that Islamabad is abandoning its past interventionist policy in Afghanistan More