News / Asia

Rahul Gandhi Faces Crucial Test in Indian Election

Kashmiri women display the indelible ink mark on their fingers after casting their votes, outside a polling station in Sheeri, about 60 kilometers (37 miles) north of Srinagar, India, May 7, 2014.
Kashmiri women display the indelible ink mark on their fingers after casting their votes, outside a polling station in Sheeri, about 60 kilometers (37 miles) north of Srinagar, India, May 7, 2014.
Anjana Pasricha
As India holds the second to the last round of voting in general elections, all eyes are on a parliamentary seat being defended by top Congress Party leader, Rahul Gandhi. His performance could play a crucial role in his political future.
Wednesday’s vote involved 64 parliamentary seats across seven states. But none got as much attention as a rural constituency in Uttar Pradesh state, Amethi, which is being defended by Rahul Gandhi, the scion of the Gandhi political dynasty, which controls the ruling Congress Party.
Amethi, an underdeveloped area, has been a Gandhi family bastion for over three decades. But in this election,  the opposition Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) has mounted an all-out challenge to the 43-year-old Congress Party leader.   
The BJP has fielded a well known television actress, Smriti Irani, against Rahul Gandhi, who has represented Amethi for ten years. A new party, Aam Aadmi Party, has pitted a popular anti-corruption campaigner, Kumar Vishwas, against him.
And in what many observers interpreted as a sign of nervousness, Rahul Gandhi put in an appearance in Amethi as it voted Wednesday and personally went around to polling booths - something he has not done in past elections.
As people lined up to vote, some spoke of unswerving loyalty to the Gandhi family.  Some others expressed dissatisfaction that their lot has not improved although they are represented by the powerful Gandhi family. They pointed to poor roads, hundreds of unemployed young people and lack of electricity.
Rahul Gandhi is widely expected to win the race. But analysts say if the victory margin is narrow, it will only strengthen charges that he has been ineffective in leading the Congress Party’s election campaign.
A professor of political science at Hyderabad University, Jyotirmaya Sharma, said a poor result will be a political setback.  “His [Rahul Gandhi] credibility within the Congress has been eroded anyway during the course of the election as somebody who neither has the charisma nor the ideas to push the Congress campaign forward. He has not been able to put a positive gloss on the Congress’s ten years. That is where his failure lies,” stated Sharma.
Although Rahul Gandhi has not been named the prime ministerial candidate of the Congress Party, he is seen as the man who will inherit its leadership from his mother, Sonia Gandhi.
His rival, the opposition prime ministerial candidate, Narendra Modi, has relentlessly run down the Gandhi family’s leadership.
And the war of words between Modi and the Gandhi family has grown bitter in recent days. Modi has mocked Rahul Gandhi as a pampered prince and questioned the relevance of the Gandhis. They have accused him of indulging in low level politics.  
Modi even shrugged aside a tradition in which senior leaders do not canvass in the constituencies of top rivals, and addressed a rally in Amethi on Monday, taking the battle into the turf of the Gandhis. He accused them of neglecting the area and promised to transform it in months, promoting himself as a man who can deliver development.  
A political analyst at the Observer Research Foundation, Satish Misra, said Rahul Gandhi is fighting widespread disillusionment with the governing Congress Party coalition known as UPA (United Progressive Alliance).
“He was carrying a very heavy baggage on his shoulder, ten years of anti incumbency of the UPA and lots of scams and scandals had taken out the sheen of the Congress Party and he was asked to lead a campaign which was burdened by all this,” said Misra.
Political analysts said that if projections that the Congress Party will lose come true, Rahul Gandhi will concentrate on rebuilding the party that has dominated India since Independence.
The votes in India's phased national elections will be counted on May 16, after the last round of polling ends on Monday.

Clashes, low voter turnout in Indian Kashmir

Few voters in Indian-controlled Kashmir have defied a separatist boycott of India's national election, with protesters clashing with police in parts of the disputed Himalayan region.

Demonstrators threw stones at security forces in the Baramulla area Wednesday, the third day of voting in Kashmir. A bomb blast at a polling station in the same district reportedly injured at least one paramilitary soldier.

Separatists have called on Kashmiris to boycott India's five week parliamentary election and voter turnout in the region is estimated to be as low as 20 percent.  The vote has been marred by violence with suspected militants killing local leaders as a warning to residents not to take part in the election.

Witnesses say in the towns of Sopore and Bandipore Wednesday, protesters kept villagers from heading to polls, with crowds attacking booths, injuring at least four security personnel.

Thousands of police and paramilitary soldiers are deployed across Indian-controlled Kashmir to provide security during what is being called the world's largest democratic exercise. India has more than 800 million registered voters who will be selecting members of the lower house of parliament.

Kashmir is divided between India and Pakistan and claimed in full by both. Since 1989, various Muslim separatist groups have been fighting for Kashmir's independence from Hindu-majority India or a merger with Muslim-majority Pakistan.

The nuclear-armed neighbors have fought two wars over the Himalayan region since gaining independence from Britain in 1947. Thousands of people have been killed in the insurgency.

You May Like

Guatemala Mudslide Death Toll Rises to 86

Death toll is expected to continue to rise as emergency crews dig through tons of earth for an estimated 350 people still missing More

Goodbye Pocahontas: Photos Reveal Today's Real Native Americans

Weary of stereotypes, photographer Matika Wilbur is determined to reshape the public's perception of her people More

Debris Found in Search for Missing Ship

Objects located Sunday have not yet been confirmed to be from the 240 meter container ship, El Faro, which disappeared in the eye of Hurricane Joaquin, according to US Coast Guard More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
by: R.S.Gadasalli from: USA
May 07, 2014 1:49 PM
This young man with zero administrative experience and billions in bank accounts is being guided by people who are the supporters of communal Muslim organizations and leftist leaning organizations. He blamed Modi for selling the lands to big business where his UPA govt has appreciated the land dealings with big business as the best in the country.

He refuses to accept the verdict of the highest courts of the land which have said Modi is not guilty of any crime but continues to attack him for 2002 riots. He keeps quiet on atrocities on Hindus and Sikhs but blames the Hindus as communal. He wont be PM of India and his family is losing grounds in India. Once the new govt goes after their ill-gotten looted wealth, their days of power will end.

by: Rahul from: USA
May 07, 2014 11:03 AM
Congress’s Amethi candidate Rahul Gandhi himself got embroiled in several questionable practices during this high stakes election, which has the potential to nix his political career and ambitions forever. For the first time in the past 10 years, the Gandhi scion spent the night in Amethi and remained present during the polling, thus revealing his anxiety about his fate due to the threat mounted by Smriti Irani and the AAP’s Kumar Vishwas. See what Rahul Gandhi is up to in Amethi As Rahul Gandhi moved from booth to booth inside the constituency, which has also been shown on ABP News, the social media got after him with unexpected ferocity.

Many things were amiss with the Congress vice-president’s behavior. To begin with, a person who is an SPG protectee cannot move around the constituency with security, much less enter a polling booth if not a voter in the constituency, which Gandhi is not, having cast his vote in Delhi on April 7. The law states, “(21) On the day of the poll, no person who has been assessed to be having a security threat and therefore given official security shall enter the vicinity of a polling station premise (within 100 meters) with his security personnel. Further, on the day of the poll no such person shall move around in a constituency with his security personnel. If the person provided with official security happens to be a voter also, then he or she shall restrict his / her movement – accompanied by security personnel, to voting only”.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Russia’s Syria Involvement Raising Concerns in Europei
Luis Ramirez
October 02, 2015 4:45 PM
European nations are joining the United States in demanding that Russia stop targeting opposition groups other than the Islamic State militants as Russian warplanes continue to conduct raids in Syria. The demand came in a statement from Britain, France, Germany, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and the United States Friday. VOA Europe correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.

Video Russia’s Syria Involvement Raising Concerns in Europe

European nations are joining the United States in demanding that Russia stop targeting opposition groups other than the Islamic State militants as Russian warplanes continue to conduct raids in Syria. The demand came in a statement from Britain, France, Germany, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and the United States Friday. VOA Europe correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.

Video First Self-Driving Truck Debuts on European Highways

The first automated semi-trailer truck started its maiden voyage Friday, Oct. 2, on a European highway. The Daimler truck called 'Actros' is the first potentially mass-produced truck whose driver will be required only to monitor the situation, similar to the role of an airline captain while the plane is in autopilot mode. VOA’s George Putic reports.

Video Nano-tech Filter Cleans Dirty Water

Access to clean water is a problem for hundreds of millions of people around the world. Now, a scientist and chemical engineer in Tanzania (in East Africa) is working to change that by creating an innovative water filter that makes dirty water safe. VOA’s Deborah Block has the story.

Video Demand Rising for Organic Produce in Cambodia

In Cambodia, where rice has long been the main cash crop, farmers are being encouraged to turn to vegetables to satisfy the growing demand for locally produced organic farm products. Daniel de Carteret has more from Phnom Penh.

Video Migrant Influx Costs Europe, But Economy Could Benefit

The influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants is testing Europe’s ability to respond – especially in the poorer Balkan states. But some analysts argue that Europe will benefit by welcoming the huge numbers of young people – many of them well educated and willing to work. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.

Video Botanists Grow Furniture, with Pruning Shears

For something a bit out of the ordinary to furnish your home, why not consider wooden chairs, crafted by nature, with a little help from some British botanists with an eye for design. VOA’s Jessica Berman reports.

Video New Fabric Helps Fight Dust-Related Allergies

Many people around the world suffer from dust-related allergies, caused mainly by tiny mites that live in bed linen. Polish scientists report they have successfully tested a fabric that is impenetrable to the microscopic creatures. VOA’s George Putic has more.

Video Burkina Faso's Economy Deeply Affected by Political Turmoil

Political turmoil in Burkina Faso over the past year has taken a toll on the economy. The transitional government is reporting nearly $70 million in losses in the ten days that followed a short-lived coup by members of the presidential guard earlier this month. The crisis shut businesses and workers went on strike. With elections on the horizon, Emilie Iob reports on what a return to political stability can do for the country's economic recovery.

Video Fleeing Violence, Some Syrians Find Refuge in Irbil

As Syrians continue to flee their country’s unrest to seek new lives in safer places, VOA Persian Service reporter Shepol Abbassi visited Irbil, where a number Syrians have taken refuge. During the religious holidy of Eid al-Adha, the city largely shut down, as temperatures soared. Amy Katz narrates his report.

Video Nigeria’s Wecyclers Work for Reusable Future in Lagos

The streets and lagoons of Africa's largest city - Lagos, Nigeria - are often clogged with trash, almost none of which gets recycled. One company is trying to change that. Chris Stein reports for VOA from Lagos.

Video Sketch Artist Helps Catch Criminals, Gives a Face to Deceased

Police often face the problem of trying to find a crime suspect based on general descriptions that could fit hundreds of people in the vicinity of the crime. In these cases, an artist can use information from witnesses to sketch a likeness that police can show the public via newspapers and television. But, as VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Houston, such sketches can also help bring back faces of the dead.

Video Thailand Set to Build China-like Internet Firewall

Thai authorities are planning to tighten control over the Internet, creating a single international access point so they can better monitor content. VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Bangkok on what is being called Thailand’s own "Great Firewall."

Video Croatian Town’s War History Evokes Empathy for Migrants

As thousands of Afghanistan, Iraqi and Syrian migrants pass through Croatia, locals are reminded of their own experiences with war and refugees in the 1990s. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from the town of Vukovar, where wartime scars still are visible today.

Video Long Drought Affecting California’s Sequoias

California is suffering under a historic four-year drought and scientists say even the state's famed sequoia trees are feeling the pain. The National Park Service has started detailed research to see how it can help the oldest living things on earth survive. VOA’s George Putic reports.

VOA Blogs