News / Europe

    Ukraine's Ex-PM Receives Hero's Welcome

    Amid Upheaval, 'Glory to the Heroes'i
    X
    February 22, 2014 10:05 PM
    It was a day of mourning on Kiev's Independence Square for dozens of people killed during the past week's clashes between police and pro-reform protesters. But it played out against a backdrop of political high drama. VOA's Al Pessin has more.
    VIDEO: Traditional Ukrainian saying, 'glory to the heroes,' takes on new meaning as it is displayed on a hillside and endlessly repeated in greetings
    VOA News
    Ukrainians gave newly-freed opposition leader and former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko a hero's welcome as she addressed protesters in Kiev Saturday, where she urged them to continue their demonstrations.

    As part of a deal to end weeks of violence, Tymoshenko was freed from a prison hospital where she had been serving time for abuse of power — a charge her supporters say was political revenge by President Viktor Yanukovych.

    Newly freed Ukrainian opposition icon, former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko looks delivers a speech, Kiev's Independance square, Feb. 22, 2014.Newly freed Ukrainian opposition icon, former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko looks delivers a speech, Kiev's Independance square, Feb. 22, 2014.
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    Newly freed Ukrainian opposition icon, former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko looks delivers a speech, Kiev's Independance square, Feb. 22, 2014.
    Newly freed Ukrainian opposition icon, former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko looks delivers a speech, Kiev's Independance square, Feb. 22, 2014.
    Speaking from a wheelchair due to severe back pain, Tymoshenko called protesters heroes and the best of Ukraine before breaking down in tears. A long-time Yanukovych adversary, Tymoshenko said that a "dictatorship has fallen" as she honored the protesters who lost their lives.

    Earlier Saturday, Ukraine's parliament voted to dismiss President Yanukovych and set early elections for May 25. Parliament also elected a new speaker, Oleksandr Turchynov, a longtime Tymoshenko ally. Former speaker and government supporter Volodymyr Rybak submitted his resignation, citing ill health.

    In an interview Saturday with a Ukrainian television station, Yanukovych said he intends to remain in office. He called the violent uprising against him an example of a "coup," and compared it to the Nazis' rise to power in Germany in the 1930s.

    The president, who is in Kharkiv near the Russian border, also said all decisions made by Ukraine's parliament Saturday were illegal.

    Yanukovych, however, has been left almost powerless. His cabinet promised to back a new government, the police said it supported the opposition, and the army said it would not get involved.

    According to reports by Reuters, presidential loyalists in predominantly Russian-speaking parts of eastern Ukraine are questioning the parliamentary actions, and the reports indicate calls have been issued to assume control of pro-Yanukovich territories.

    "The move appeared to increase the possibility of a split in the sprawling former Soviet republic of 46 million, despite denials by the leaders that this was their intention," the Reuters story said.

    Story continues below photo gallery
    • Ukrainian opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko (C) is transported on a wheelchair upon her arrival at the airport in Kyiv, Feb. 22, 2014.
    • Members of Berkut anti-riot unit prepare to leave their barracks in Kyiv. The heads of four Ukrainian security bodies, including the police's Berkut anti-riot units, appeared in parliament and declared they would not take part in any conflict with the people.
    • Yevgenia Tymoshenko (R) reacts as the Parliament voted to free her mother, opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko, during a session in Kyiv.
    • Anti-government protesters stand guard in front of the Ukrainian parliament in Kyiv. Protesters took control of the capital and parliament and sought to oust the president.
    • Protesters ride atop of what appears to be a military truck, in central Kyiv.
    • Protesters stand guard in front of presidential administrative building in central Kyiv.
    • People discuss in front of a poster showing jailed Ukrainian opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko in central Kyiv.
    • Ukrainian opposition leader and head of the UDAR (Punch) party Vitaly Klitschko (L) greets anti-government protesters outside the parliament building in Kyiv.
    • A suspected supporter of Ukraine's embattled President Viktor Yanukovych, center, is assaulted by anti-government protesters in Kyiv.
    • A protester waves an EU flag at the Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych's country residence in Mezhyhirya.
    • Anti-government protesters stand in a line outside the Ukrainian Parliament building in Kyiv.
    • Ukrainian opposition leader and head of the UDAR (Punch) party Vitaly Klitschko (C, front) talks to his colleagues, with newly elected speaker of parliament Oleksander Turchynov (R, top) seen in the background, during a session of the parliament in Kyiv.
    • Two women prepare to place flowers on a wall in the Independence Square in Kyiv.
    • People carry the coffin of a protester, who was killed after days of violence, during a funeral service in Kyiv.
    • Anti-government protesters attack a deputy of the Party of Regions Vitaly Grushevsky (2nd L, front) outside the Ukrainian Parliament building in Kyiv.
    • Protesters march towards government buildings in central Kyiv.
    • Protesters gather in the Independence square in central Kyiv. Protesters claimed full control of the city following the signing of a Western-brokered peace deal aimed at ending the nation's three-month political crisis.

    The United States welcomed today's developments and urged the quick formation of a unity government. In a statement, the White House said the developments could move Ukraine closer to a de-escalation of violence, constitutional change and early elections.

    "We welcome former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko’s release from a prison hospital today, and we wish her a speedy recovery as she seeks the appropriate medical treatment that she has long needed and sought," the statement said.

    Day of action, mourning

    Ukrainian protesters also took control of President Yanukovych's offices in Kiev on Saturday, while others let themselves onto the grounds of the president's lavish but secret estate outside the capital, which includes a private zoo, and toured his house. Some say they are stunned that one person could have so much while others in Ukraine have nothing.

    Meanwhile, thousands massed in Independence Square, where opposition leader Vitaly Klitschko urged Yanukovych to resign so elections can be held no later than May.

    The protest camp on Kyiv's main square also hosted funerals and memorial services to mourn protesters cut down by police attacks and snipers.

    There were prayers and tributes, and tears from people who probably never knew the victims. People stopped at makeshift shrines to pay their respects.

    "I am commemorating those who died for our freedom, for people who just want to live a better life," said Olga, a Kiev resident who gave only her first name.

    Ukrainian entrepreneur and researcher Valerii Pekar called it a political revolution, but also much more.

    "This is a revolution in mentality," he said. "This is a revolution of values, new values against old values. ... It's values of modern society against values of old paternalistic Soviet-style society."

    Friday agreement

    Split between those in the east who favor ties with Russia and those in the west who lean toward the European Union, Ukraine erupted in protest when Yanukovych in November backed out of a trade deal with the European Union in favor of closer ties to Moscow. The protests began peacefully but descended into violence earlier this month. Nearly 100 people have since been killed, including some protesters who were shot in the head by police snipers.

    In spite of Friday's political deal for new elections and other concessions by Yanukovych, demonstrators objected to the agreement, which aimed to end the country's political crisis. The deal was signed by both the president and the opposition leadership.

    On Saturday, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov told officials from France, Poland and Germany the opposition was failing to fulfill Friday's agreement. Foreign ministers from those three countries helped broker the deal.

    The deal returns Ukraine to its 2004 constitution, limiting presidential powers, and also sets up a coalition government and early elections.

    Tymoshenko was one of the leaders of Ukraine's 2004 Orange Revolution, when the Supreme Court threw out the results of an apparently flawed presidential election won by Yanukovych and ordered a new vote.

    She became prime minister under the new president, Viktor Yushchenko. After Yanukovych defeated Tymoshenko in the 2010 presidential election, she was put on trial for alleged abuse of power over a natural gas deal with Russia and sentenced to prison.

    VOA correspondent Al Pessin contributed to this report, and some information was provided by Reuters, AP and AFP.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Markt from: Virginia
    February 22, 2014 10:19 PM
    Let us hope that Peace can be restored and this bring the end of such terrible violence and death for the Ukraine. In such matters as what has been happening there for months, too many people have died.

    by: Paul VanGogh from: Bloomington, Indiana USA
    February 22, 2014 9:48 PM
    Another nail in corrult Putin's coffin.

    More important: a people overthrew the tyrant they had. Glory to the Ukrainian people :) , :) !
    In Response

    by: Mike from: USA
    February 22, 2014 10:50 PM
    Agree. Opposition in Ukraine won. But won at the moment. Now the important thing to keep this victory and prevent dual power in the country. Putin has suffered a failure of its neo-imperial policies and now he can go to any crime, as even more gangster than Yanukovych ...

    by: Oleksandr Shepel from: Luhansk, Ukraine
    February 22, 2014 9:34 PM
    Glory to Ukraine! Glory to Ukrainian Heroes! Glory to Heroes of Maidan!

    by: Dr. Bentley Scratchcrotch from: Miami
    February 22, 2014 5:52 PM
    The rebels in Ukraine are funded by that scum, George Soros, just like the CIA funds Al Qaeda from offshore banks! Of course, we have no way of knowing for sure, not that we shouldn’t expect Rachel Maddow and Keith Olbermann over at MSNBC — a network that owes its very existence to the eugenicist Bill Gates and the death merchant General Electric – to show journalistic objectivity and not feature whatever cobbled together and staged propaganda is produced by the well-paid minions of George Soros.
    In Response

    by: Tony
    February 24, 2014 2:04 AM
    O, you like TV RT America - but my friend - the real name for "RT America" - "Russia Today" America - Putin "KGB" TV .... for Edward Snowden main TV Source .... on English, Spanish and Arabic brainwash Americans
    In Response

    by: jimmy from: japan
    February 22, 2014 9:47 PM
    you are just saying something what you are thinking, which is not true! if things going like so apparantly, the world will become easier! because there are so many things going on which most of us dont know

    by: Moe from: Wahington D.C.
    February 22, 2014 4:41 PM
    Another nail in the coffin of the mafia boss Putin and his russian oligarch mob goons.

    by: PermReader
    February 22, 2014 12:49 PM
    Tymoshenko`s sentence-the most rediculouse sentence in the world:the signing agriment with the president`s best friend-Putin.

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