News / Africa

International Community Running Out of Patience with South Sudan

FILE - Members of South Suda'sn rebel delegation talk with US Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan Mr. Donald E. Booth (R) on Jan. 4, 2014 during talks in Addis Ababa to try and broker a ceasefire between Salva Kiir-led government forces and rebels allied to deposed vice president, Riek Machar.
FILE - Members of South Suda'sn rebel delegation talk with US Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan Mr. Donald E. Booth (R) on Jan. 4, 2014 during talks in Addis Ababa to try and broker a ceasefire between Salva Kiir-led government forces and rebels allied to deposed vice president, Riek Machar.
Marthe van der Wolf
The international community says it is running out of patience with the progress of the South Sudan peace negotiations. The talks between South Sudan's government and rebel forces have dragged on for nearly three months, with little progress except for an often-violated cease-fire agreement. A new round of talks are scheduled to start Thursday.
 
South Sudan might face consequences from the international community, if the involved parties do not take the peace negotiations more seriously.
 
United States special envoy to South Sudan Donald Booth issued that warning Wednesday, on behalf of Britain, Norway and the European Union. He said that greater efforts are needed from the fighting parties.
 
“If the government or any other actor tried to undermine the peace process and rebuff the IGAD heads of state, they will face consequences," he said. "The people of South Sudan expect renewal, they expect their voices to be heard in forging a more sustainable peace. Business as usual is not a viable way forward.”
 
Peace talks mediated by the East African bloc IGAD, are set to continue Thursday in Addis Ababa.

But South Sudan’s government said this week that it would not send a delegation to the talks, if pro-rebel political figures the government detained for several weeks are a part of the process.

The opposition side, meanwhile, has voiced concerns about the stabilization and protection force that IGAD’s member states are planning to send to South Sudan next month.
 
EU special envoy to the Horn of Africa Alexander Rondos warns sanctions could be placed on anyone who blocks progress toward peace.
 
“The European Union reiterates that it stands ready with targeted, restricted measures against individuals obstructing the political process, in support of the AU and IGAD, and IGAD efforts and in close coordination with IGAD partners," he said. "That obviously means that our system certainly is beginning to look at more, other type of measures that would be relevant for this particular situation.”
 
Fighting between supporters and opponents of President Salva Kiir broke out in mid-December, killing thousands in battles across the country. A ceasefire was signed in January, but the violence continues.  

Hundreds of thousands of people remain displaced amid warnings South Sudan could face a famine unless farmers feel safe enough to return to their homes and plant their fields.

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Comments
     
by: paulailpu from: rock city
March 25, 2014 1:51 PM
Wat is outcome of natigation?


by: Revealing from: USA
March 20, 2014 11:18 AM
The term "International Community" is an interesting concept. What does it imply? Cohesive thoughts of the majority? What happens when the paradigm shifts and the programmers of these cohesive thoughts are no longer able to maintain the will of the ruling class? True freedom to see reality perhaps? Is not a New World Order one should be concerned, but rather the dying breath of the Old World Order; http://www.focusonrecovery.net


by: malolo kei from: Dengka-man
March 20, 2014 8:37 AM
what is the interest behind international communities of facing some consequenses if some interest are not meet? Foresure, what so called third bloc are clothed with bridgegroom-new wife for interim government which is claimed but what is the difference between Riak machar and the third bloc???????


by: Tut chuol Guor from: Ethiopia
March 20, 2014 8:11 AM
Its to be the gov't of s.sudan to face consequence for violation of negotiation How come the gov't violate the Intl community rule while calling for IGAD to protect its power alive the question is that,Does IGAD support kiir to violate the mediation? I THINK igad has deal with kiir since it is ran by Yuweri Museveni

In Response

by: malolo kei from: Deng-ka-man
March 20, 2014 8:56 AM
Tut. Both ruling and the rebellers are all under government of S.Sudan and both violate the IGAD special the splm-in-opp because there is no need for claiming 4 detainees and 7 are release to them as focul point, let them continue with negotiation if they fully mind of civilians' live which they claimed are going to rule/govern of which those who are not in Adis-ababa will not lose live.

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