News / Middle East

Moderate Candidate Has Early Lead in Iran's Presidential Election

Presidential candidates from left: Saeed Jalili, Iran's top nuclear negotiator, Gholam Ali Haddad Adel, parliament lawmaker, and Hasan Rowhani, former top nuclear negotiator, attend TV debate, Tehran, June 7, 2013.
Presidential candidates from left: Saeed Jalili, Iran's top nuclear negotiator, Gholam Ali Haddad Adel, parliament lawmaker, and Hasan Rowhani, former top nuclear negotiator, attend TV debate, Tehran, June 7, 2013.
VOA News
Early results from Iran's presidential election have moderate candidate Hassan Rowhani with the lead among the six candidates.  He has the support of reformists in Iran.

Rowhani has just over 50 percent of the 12 million votes counted by Saturday morning. Tehran Mayor Bagher Qalibaf in second place is far behind with about 15 percent of the votes.

It is not clear when the final results will be announced. About 50 million Iranians are eligible to vote, and Iranian media have reported turnout estimates of between 75 and 80 percent.

To win, a candidate must get more than 50 percent of the vote.  If no one succeeds after the initial vote, a runoff election will take place next Friday.

Officials extended voting by several hours Friday to accommodate what they described as a large turnout in the country's presidential election.  

Millions of Iranians voted to choose a successor to President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who is constitutionally barred from a third consecutive term.

Analysts say the high interest in the carefully orchestrated campaign may be due to the candidacy of moderate cleric Rowhani. Iran's former nuclear negotiator picked up the endorsements of leading reformists.

Former president Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, another reformist leader, who was barred from running by Iran's Guardian Council of clerics and jurists, also had urged his supporters not to boycott the election.

Most other candidates in the the electioni, including current chief nuclear negotiator Saeed Jalili and Tehran Mayor Qalibaf, are considered hardliners who are loyal to the country's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

The supreme leader cast his vote in Tehran early Friday, telling U.S. officials who have been critical of the election, "the hell with you."

Khamenei had been calling on Iranians to vote in large numbers.

The election winner will be faced with an economy struggling with high unemployment and inflation, crippled by international sanctions imposed over Iran's disputed nuclear program.  

While some candidates favor improved ties with the international community, major policy decisions rest with the supreme leader.

Iran sealed most of its borders, rounded up dissidents and detained some journalists. Most foreign news organizations say their requests for visas to cover the election were unheeded by the government.

One candidate seen as reformist, Mohammad Reza Aref, recently dropped out and then announced his support for Rowhani. Another candidate, Gholam Ali Haddad Adel, dropped out of contention Monday saying he wanted to boost the chances of his fellow conservatives.

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by: Godwin from: Nigeria
June 15, 2013 1:26 PM
The moderate cleric has actually won. Good. But how moderate is moderate in Iranian terms? With everything to be determined by the supreme leader, what should anyone expect from the so-called moderate cleric? But he is cleric first and foremost, and that should not be lost on anyone. So being cleric, it does not seem that anyone is going to expect much difference from what obtained in the past, maybe only a change in tactics, maybe some kind of diplomatic swap here and there while the status quo remains, at least in principle. Is the lot of the people in the country going to change? Are the people going to be opened up to see what is going on around them and in the world? Will it still be Mr. Khamenei calling the shorts and threatening even the president who may be just a rubber stamp after all? What is going to change if at the end Hassan Rowhani's election is ratified? Will he afford to change Iran from a confrontational belligerent to a friendly country? Will he change Ahmadinejad's stand against Israel and civilization? Iran can only be a bunch of questions for now until we see what comes after the elections.


by: ST12 from: Iran
June 14, 2013 11:33 PM
another "moderate"... hey VOA you keep corrupting the English language - you are becoming an Islamic propaganda BS

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