News / Middle East

Iran Hero Pilot Shahbazi 'Forced To Retire' Over Sanctions Campaign

Iran 'Hero Pilot' Says Forced To Retire Over Sanctionsi
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Henry Ridgwell
October 23, 2012 8:54 PM
One year ago, an Iran Air pilot was hailed as a hero after he safely landed a passenger plane whose front landing gear had failed to open. The captain started a campaign against international sanctions, which he says are making civil aircraft in Iran unsafe -- but now he has been forced to retire for apparently embarrassing the government. Henry Ridgwell reports.

Iran 'Hero Pilot' Says Forced To Retire Over Sanctions

Henry Ridgwell
— A year ago, an Iran Air pilot was hailed as a hero after he safely landed a passenger plane whose front landing gear had failed to open. The captain started a campaign against international sanctions, which he says are making civil aircraft in Iran unsafe. But now he has been forced to retire, for apparently embarrassing the government.

Cellphone footage posted on the Internet shows Iran Air Flight 742 from Moscow approaching Tehran's Imam Khomeini International Airport on October 18th last year.

The front landing gear of the 40-year-old Boeing has failed to open. On board are 113 passengers and crew.

The captain, Houshang Shahbazi, pulls off an extraordinarily smooth landing, keeping the nose up until the last seconds. No one is injured.

Shahbazi's heroic actions got him an audience with government ministers. He was paraded on TV talk shows.

"Unfortunately sanctions imposed by Western countries on civilian airlines in Iran have caused a considerable number of plane crashes and led to the deaths of hundreds of passengers," said Shahbazi.

Shahbazi said that the landing gear failed because of low hydraulic pressure - caused by wear and tear to aging parts.

"It is not fair for ordinary people to become victims of political tension between governments, and lose their lives to such issues," Shahbazi added.  "I ask you, who are the main decision makers and lawmakers of the world, to reconsider this type of sanction placed on Iran."

That appeal appears to have angered the Iranian government.

On his Facebook page, Shahbazi says he has now been forced to retire nine years early after "refusing to make a pledge not to engage in any social activity."

The Iranian government has offered no explanation.

But Shahbazi's campaign has highlighted the fact that sanctions on Iran over its nuclear program are starting to bite hard - something the Iranian government wants to hide, says Mark Fitzpatrick of the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London.

"There is pretty much a blanket ban on all U.S. trade with Iran and civilian aircraft parts don't fall into the humanitarian exemption from this," Fitzpatrick noted.  "I think it's very unfortunate that the Iranian people are really suffering under the sanctions. And there is a way out. I wish the Iranian government would see that way and take it."

U.S. and European Union officials say the sanctions are vital to persuade Iran to halt its nuclear enrichment program. Tehran denies claims that it is trying to build an atomic bomb.

"Iran is finding it very difficult to obtain parts and ingredients for its missile program and for some elements of its nuclear program," added Fitzpatrick.  "The nuclear program continues to expand, but not at the pace that Iran had planned. The second way that sanctions have worked is that they have brought Iran to the negotiating table."

Unless there is a diplomatic breakthrough, aviation experts say Iran will have continue maintaining its aging fleet of aircraft using parts bought on the black market.

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by: Anonymous
October 24, 2012 1:38 PM
Excellent news, the sanctions are putting a grip on Iran, what they were supposed to do. It's really easy Iran, you abide by world agreements on nuclear treaty, or you get your hand smacked. Which is it? I think Iran has had too many chances already. Either you abide, or you don't and if you don't the world will put an end to your activities.

These are just stupid decisions made by the Iranian government, any of the numerous Iranian people I know hate their government.The people of Iran are wonderfull people, I wish them no harm.

There is lots of talk that if Nato or Israel takes out the nuclear plants, immediatly the people of Iran will revolt against their government and kick them out of power. This would actually be a great thing. Iranian government is walking a thin line.


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
October 24, 2012 11:54 AM
Hitler asked his engineers to manufacture a car that could cross the desert without using radiator cooling - that is water. Ahmadinejad is experimenting with the lives of Iranians to see how he can be another Hitler to circumvent the sanctions, reach the far ends of the world and conquer every nation. Fortunately Ahmadinejad leaves office June 2013, but he is not the only problem Iran has. In fact he is only a 5.1% of Iran's problems. The real problem is Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the so-called spiritual leader of Iran. He will not wake up from his dream of ruling the world until his dramatic end, which will suit that of Adolf Hitler.


by: jerseyboy54 from: USA
October 23, 2012 6:08 PM
if thay spent less money on there hi teck motor boats thay would have the money to fix there planes this is another snowjob with all that oil money thay say thay have this should not be a problem thats right there oil money is a third of what it should be and there money is worthless and there people are ready to revolt

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